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Phonological impairment

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28631953/a-morpho-phonological-past-tense-processing-as-a-clinical-marker-in-sli-efl-learners
#1
Elena Even-Simkin
The clinical marker in specific language impairment (SLI) population is the subject of considerable debate. SLI is the one of the frequently diagnosed atypical language phenomena found among early school-age children (McArthur et al., 2000; Spear-Swerling, 2006). For example, children with SLI have difficulty applying the Past Tense rule to verbs, even though they can accurately repeat phonologically similar forms of the words (Hoeffner & McClelland, 1993). In this study, I discuss the grammatical deficits in the SLI population by studying the generation of both 'regular' and 'irregular' English Past Tense forms and explain how the rates of the correct use of the 'irregular' versus 'regular' form may be considered as a clinical SLI marker...
February 15, 2017: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28601572/corpus-callosum-atrophy-as-a-marker-of-clinically-meaningful-cognitive-decline-in-secondary-progressive-multiple-sclerosis-impact-on-employment-status
#2
Athanasios Papathanasiou, Lambros Messinis, Petros Zampakis, Panagiotis Papathanasopoulos
Cognitive impairment in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is more frequent and pronounced in secondary progressive MS (SPMS). Cognitive decline is an important predictor of employment status in patients with MS. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) markers have been used to associate tissue damage with cognitive dysfunction. The aim of the study was to designate the MRI marker that predicts cognitive decline in SPMS and explore its effect on employment status. 30 SPMS patients and 30 healthy participants underwent neuropsychological assessment using the Trail Making Test (TMT) parts A and B, semantic and phonological verbal fluency task and a computerized cognitive screening battery (Central Nervous System Vital Signs)...
June 7, 2017: Journal of Clinical Neuroscience: Official Journal of the Neurosurgical Society of Australasia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28593865/the-semiology-of-benign-focal-epilepsy-with-affective-symptoms
#3
Fábio A Nascimento, Márcio A Sotero de Menezes, Cristiane A Simao, Bruno T Takeshita, Samanta F Blattes da Rocha, Pedro A Kowacs
Benign focal epilepsy with affective symptoms (BFEAS) is a rare childhood epilepsy syndrome essentially characterized by "epileptic attacks with affective symptoms of a terrifying type". Since the original description, approximately 50 cases have been reported. To our knowledge, however, none of the studies included video-EEG data. Herein, we detail the electroclinical features of a neurodevelopmentally normal 9-year-old boy with epilepsy since the age of 2 years. His seizure semiology essentially consisted of nocturnal focal seizures featuring abrupt fear and autonomic phenomena (such as excessive sweating, repeated swallowing, and coughing), associated with impaired consciousness...
June 7, 2017: Epileptic Disorders: International Epilepsy Journal with Videotape
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28590881/effects-of-irrelevant-background-speech-on-eye-movements-during-reading
#4
Guoli Yan, Zhu Meng, Nina Liu, Liyuan He, Kevin B Paterson
The irrelevant speech effect (ISE) refers to the impairment of visual information processing by background speech. Prior research on the ISE has focused on short-term memory for visually-presented word lists. The present research extends this work by using measurements of eye movements to examine effects of irrelevant background speech during Chinese reading. This enabled an examination of the ISE for a language in which access to semantic representations is not strongly mediated by phonology. Participants read sentences while exposed to meaningful irrelevant speech, meaningless speech (scrambled meaningful speech) or silence...
June 7, 2017: Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology: QJEP
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28590148/the-phonological-memory-profile-of-preschool-children-who-make-atypical-speech-sound-errors
#5
Rebecca Waring, Patricia Eadie, Susan Rickard Liow, Barbara Dodd
Previous research indicates that children with speech sound disorders (SSD) have underlying phonological memory deficits. The SSD population, however, is diverse. While children who make consistent atypical speech errors (phonological disorder/PhDis) are known to have executive function deficits in rule abstraction and cognitive flexibility, little is known about their memory profile. Sixteen monolingual preschool children with atypical speech errors (PhDis) were matched individually to age-and-gender peers with typically developing speech (TDS)...
June 7, 2017: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28577444/auditory-processing-deficits-are-sometimes-necessary-and-sometimes-sufficient-for-language-difficulties-in-children-evidence-from-mild-to-moderate-sensorineural-hearing-loss
#6
Lorna F Halliday, Outi Tuomainen, Stuart Rosen
There is a general consensus that many children and adults with dyslexia and/or specific language impairment display deficits in auditory processing. However, how these deficits are related to developmental disorders of language is uncertain, and at least four categories of model have been proposed: single distal cause models, risk factor models, association models, and consequence models. This study used children with mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss (MMHL) to investigate the link between auditory processing deficits and language disorders...
May 31, 2017: Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28569544/novel-reading-index-for-identifying-disordered-reading-skill-development-a-preliminary-study
#7
Brianne Mohl, Noa Ofen, Lara L Jones, Joseph E Casey, Jeffrey A Stanley
Children with ADHD are at high risk of developing a Reading Disability (RD), although the reasons remain unclear. ADHD-associated impairments, including processing speed, can complicate clinical evaluation for a co-occurring RD diagnosis. We propose a novel metric to (a) assess reading development and (b) provide an alternative method to classifying readers that may aid investigations for etiologies of RD in ADHD. Specifically, as both phonological decoding and word recognition skills are important precursors of reading fluency, we propose a new quantitative method comparing these skills after accounting for variations in perception, motor response, or processing speeds...
June 1, 2017: Applied Neuropsychology. Child
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28549355/predictors-of-language-gains-among-school-age-children-with-language-impairment-in-the-public-schools
#8
Laura M Justice, Hui Jiang, Jessica A Logan, Mary Beth Schmitt
Purpose: This study aimed to identify child-level characteristics that predict gains in language skills for children with language impairment who were receiving therapy within the public schools. The therapy provided represented business-as-usual speech/language treatment provided by speech-language pathologists in the public schools. Method: The sample included 272 kindergartners and first-graders with language impairment who participated in a larger study titled "Speech-Therapy Experiences in the Public Schools...
May 26, 2017: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research: JSLHR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28547010/language-development-and-impairment-in-children-with-mild-to-moderate-sensorineural-hearing-loss
#9
Lorna F Halliday, Outi Tuomainen, Stuart Rosen
Purpose: The goal of this study was to examine language development and factors related to language impairments in children with mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss (MMHL). Method: Ninety children, aged 8-16 years (46 children with MMHL; 44 aged-matched controls), were administered a battery of standardized language assessments, including measures of phonological processing, receptive and expressive vocabulary and grammar, word and nonword reading, and parental report of communication skills...
May 24, 2017: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research: JSLHR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28544439/effects-of-cognitive-impairment-on-prosodic-parameters-of-speech-production-planning-in-multiple-sclerosis
#10
Céline De Looze, Noémie Moreau, Laurent Renié, Finnian Kelly, Alain Ghio, Audrey Rico, Bertrand Audoin, François Viallet, Jean Pelletier, Caterina Petrone
Cognitive impairment (CI) affects 40-65% of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). CI can have a negative impact on a patient's everyday activities, such as engaging in conversations. Speech production planning ability is crucial for successful verbal interactions and thus for preserving social and occupational skills. This study investigates the effect of cognitive-linguistic demand and CI on speech production planning in MS, as reflected in speech prosody. A secondary aim is to explore the clinical potential of prosodic features for the prediction of an individual's cognitive status in MS...
May 24, 2017: Journal of Neuropsychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28532703/reading-difficulties-in-primary-progressive-aphasia-in-a-regular-language-speaking-cohort-of-patients
#11
Jordi A Matías-Guiu, Fernando Cuetos, María Nieves Cabrera-Martín, María Valles-Salgado, Teresa Moreno-Ramos, José Luis Carreras, Jorge Matías-Guiu
Reading impairment is an important feature in Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA). The Spanish orthography entails completely regular spelling to sound correspondences, so reading disorders may be different to English. In the current study, reading, phonological and semantic abilities of 35 patients with the three variants of PPA, and 13 healthy volunteers were assessed. Brain metabolism was concomitantly obtained from each participant using (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography imaging. Two main patterns of impairment were identified: difficulties in nonwords reading with preservation of exception words in agrammatic and logopenic aphasia, and the inverse pattern in semantic dementia...
May 19, 2017: Neuropsychologia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28522967/sources-of-phoneme-errors-in-repetition-perseverative-neologistic-and-lesion-patterns-in-jargon-aphasia
#12
Emma Pilkington, James Keidel, Luke T Kendrick, James D Saddy, Karen Sage, Holly Robson
This study examined patterns of neologistic and perseverative errors during word repetition in fluent Jargon aphasia. The principal hypotheses accounting for Jargon production indicate that poor activation of a target stimulus leads to weakly activated target phoneme segments, which are outcompeted at the phonological encoding level. Voxel-lesion symptom mapping studies of word repetition errors suggest a breakdown in the translation from auditory-phonological analysis to motor activation. Behavioral analyses of repetition data were used to analyse the target relatedness (Phonological Overlap Index: POI) of neologistic errors and patterns of perseveration in 25 individuals with Jargon aphasia...
2017: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28515265/clinical-marker-for-alzheimer-disease-pathology-in-logopenic-primary-progressive-aphasia
#13
Lucia A A Giannini, David J Irwin, Corey T McMillan, Sharon Ash, Katya Rascovsky, David A Wolk, Vivianna M Van Deerlin, Edward B Lee, John Q Trojanowski, Murray Grossman
OBJECTIVE: To determine whether logopenic features of phonologic loop dysfunction reflect Alzheimer disease (AD) neuropathology in primary progressive aphasia (PPA). METHODS: We performed a retrospective case-control study of 34 patients with PPA with available autopsy tissue. We compared baseline and longitudinal clinical features in patients with primary AD neuropathology to those with primary non-AD pathologies. We analyzed regional neuroanatomic disease burden in pathology-defined groups using postmortem neuropathologic data...
May 17, 2017: Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28497530/short-term-memory-in-childhood-dyslexia-deficient-serial-order-in-multiple-modalities
#14
Nelson Cowan, Tiffany P Hogan, Mary Alt, Samuel Green, Kathryn L Cabbage, Shara Brinkley, Shelley Gray
In children with dyslexia, deficits in working memory have not been well-specified. We assessed second-grade children with dyslexia, with and without concomitant specific language impairment, and children with typical development. Immediate serial recall of lists of phonological (non-word), lexical (digit), spatial (location) and visual (shape) items were included. For the latter three modalities, we used not only standard span but also running span tasks, in which the list length was unpredictable to limit mnemonic strategies...
May 12, 2017: Dyslexia: the Journal of the British Dyslexia Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28495601/structural-connectivity-subserving-verbal-fluency-revealed-by-lesion-behavior-mapping-in-stroke-patients
#15
Mingyang Li, Yumei Zhang, Luping Song, Ruiwang Huang, Junhua Ding, Yuxing Fang, Yangwen Xu, Zaizhu Han
Tests of verbal fluency have been widely used to assess the cognitive functioning of persons, and are typically classified into two categories (semantic and phonological fluency). While widely-distributed divergent and convergent brain regions have been found to be involved in semantic and phonological fluency, the anatomical connectivity underlying the fluency is not well understood. The present study aims to construct a comprehensive white-matter network associated with semantic and phonological fluency by investigating the relationship between the integrity of 22 major tracts in the whole brain and semantic fluency (measured by 3 cues) and phonological fluency (measured by 2 cues) in a group of 51 stroke patients...
May 8, 2017: Neuropsychologia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28493359/verbal-and-non-verbal-fluency-in-adults-with-developmental-dyslexia-phonological-processing-or-executive-control-problems
#16
James H Smith-Spark, Lucy A Henry, David J Messer, Adam P Zięcik
The executive function of fluency describes the ability to generate items according to specific rules. Production of words beginning with a certain letter (phonemic fluency) is impaired in dyslexia, while generation of words belonging to a certain semantic category (semantic fluency) is typically unimpaired. However, in dyslexia, verbal fluency has generally been studied only in terms of overall words produced. Furthermore, performance of adults with dyslexia on non-verbal design fluency tasks has not been explored but would indicate whether deficits could be explained by executive control, rather than phonological processing, difficulties...
May 11, 2017: Dyslexia: the Journal of the British Dyslexia Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28492716/prevalence-of-phonological-disorders-and-phonological-processes-in-typical-and-atypical-phonological-development
#17
Marizete Ilha Ceron, Marileda Barichello Gubiani, Camila Rosa de Oliveira, Marieli Barichello Gubiani, Márcia Keske-Soares
Purpose: To determine the occurrence of phonological disorders by age, gender and school type, and analyze the phonological processes observed in typical and atypical phonological development across different age groups. Methods: The sample consisted of 866 children aged between 3:0 and 8:11 years, recruited from public and private schools in the city of Santa Maria/RS. A phonological evaluation was performed to analyze the operative phonological processes. Results: 15...
May 8, 2017: CoDAS
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28488078/can-children-with-autism-spectrum-disorders-learn-new-vocabulary-from-linguistic-context
#18
Rebecca Lucas, Louisa Thomas, Courtenay Frazier Norbury
This study investigated whether children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) can learn vocabulary from linguistic context. Thirty-five children with ASD (18 with age-appropriate structural language; 17 with language impairment [ALI]) and 29 typically developing peers were taught 20 Science words. Half were presented in linguistic context from which meaning could be inferred, whilst half were accompanied by an explicit definition. Children with ASD were able to learn from context. Condition did not influence phonological learning, but receptive semantic knowledge was greatest in the context condition, and expressive semantic knowledge greatest in the definitional condition...
May 9, 2017: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28481668/the-development-of-writing-skills-in-4-year-old-children-with-and-without-specific-language-impairment
#19
Stacey L Pavelko, R Jane Lieberman, Jamie Schwartz, Debbie Hahs-Vaughn, Chad Nye
Research shows that many preschool children with specific language impairment (SLI) have difficulty acquiring literacy skills including phonological awareness, print concepts, and alphabet knowledge. Limited research suggests that preschool children with SLI also have difficulty with emergent writing tasks such as name writing and word writing. In typically developing children, research indicates that emergent writing skills are acquired in a developmental sequence: (1) linearity, (2) segmentation, (3) simple characters, (4) left-right orientation, (5) complex characters, (6) random letters, and (7) invented spelling...
May 8, 2017: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28464253/statistical-word-learning-in-children-with-autism-spectrum-disorder-and-specific-language-impairment
#20
Eileen Haebig, Jenny R Saffran, Susan Ellis Weismer
BACKGROUND: Word learning is an important component of language development that influences child outcomes across multiple domains. Despite the importance of word knowledge, word-learning mechanisms are poorly understood in children with specific language impairment (SLI) and children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study examined underlying mechanisms of word learning, specifically, statistical learning and fast-mapping, in school-aged children with typical and atypical development...
May 2, 2017: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, and Allied Disciplines
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