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military mental health

Edna Ruiz Magpantay-Monroe
The military and veteran populations in the U. S. state of Hawaii have a strong presence in the local communities. It was this substantial presence that provided the impetus to integrate military and veteran health into a Bachelor's of Science in Nursing (BSN) curriculum. This exploratory study investigated the relationship between the integration of military and veteran health into a psychiatric mental health BSN curriculum and nursing students' understanding of the many facets of military veterans' health...
October 6, 2016: Nurse Education Today
Christine Anne Ganzer
: A review of recent research and its relevance for nurses in all settings. ABSTRACT: The last two decades have seen increasing numbers of women entering all branches of the U.S. armed forces. Now that women in the military are no longer prohibited from holding direct combat positions, they are often exposed to traumatic events that place them at higher risk for mental health conditions. Nurses working within the Veterans Affairs (VA) system and those working in non-VA settings are likely to encounter female veterans...
October 13, 2016: American Journal of Nursing
Mark A Otto, Nicholas J Martin, Jennifer S Rous, Michael E Stevens
Dichlorvos is a chemical compound which has been used for decades as a pesticide. Potential inhalational exposure to dichlorvos vapor associated with using commercially-based, dichlorvos-impregnated resin strips in a simulated military guard post was evaluated. A varying number of these pesticide strips, ranging from the manufacturer's guidelines ((3)-16 g strips) up to a full package of strips ((12)-16 g strips), were placed in a small, enclosed space (2.31 m × 2.26 m × 2.44 m, 12.7 m(3)), which was similar in size to a typical military guard post...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene
Todd C Leroux, Hye-Chung Kum, Alan Dabney, Rebecca Wells
Since the onset of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan attention has increased on the importance of mental health with military service members. An integral component, although far less studied, are the ties between mental health and military spouses. Military deployments place considerable stress on military families. This study analyzed the mental health utilization of military spouses of active duty service members assigned to an aircraft carrier between 2011 and 2014. A negative binomial generalized estimating equation was used to examine the rate of change in mental health utilization over time against various deployment phases...
October 2016: Military Medicine
Kartavya J Vyas, Susan F Fesperman, Bonnie J Nebeker, Steven K Gerard, Nicholas D Boyd, Eileen M Delaney, Jennifer A Webb-Murphy, Scott L Johnston
The present study investigates the role of psychological resilience in protecting against the development of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and comorbid PTSD and depression; and estimates the percent reductions in incidence of, and associated treatment cost savings for, each condition as a function of increasing resilience. A retrospective cohort of mental health care-seeking service members (n = 2,171) completed patient-reported outcome measures approximately every 10 weeks as part of the Psychological Health Pathways program...
October 2016: Military Medicine
Irene Folaron, Monica Lovasz
Retention standards and policies applied to active duty members in the U.S. military who identify as transgender have recently been in evolution. The Secretary of Defense recently released a new directive allowing transgender members to serve openly with the option to transition gender while in active duty, abrogating the old policy disqualifying transgender members from continued service. There is a reasonable expectation that some may pursue medical and surgical options toward gender transition. The clinical pathway for gender transition relies heavily on Mental Health and Endocrinology services...
October 2016: Military Medicine
Joseph E Logan, Katherine A Fowler, Nimeshkumar P Patel, Kristin M Holland
INTRODUCTION: Suicide among military personnel and young Veterans remains a health concern. This study examined stateside distribution of suicides by U.S. county to help focus prevention efforts. METHODS: Using 2005-2012 National Violent Death Reporting System data from 16 states (963 counties, or county-equivalent entities), this study mapped the county-level distribution of suicides among current military and Veteran decedents aged 18-35 years. This study also compared incident circumstances of death between decedents in high-density counties (i...
November 2016: American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Sarah DeGue, Katherine A Fowler, Cynthia Calkins
INTRODUCTION: Several high-profile cases in the U.S. have drawn public attention to the use of lethal force by law enforcement (LE), yet research on such fatalities is limited. Using data from a public health surveillance system, this study examined the characteristics and circumstances of these violent deaths to inform prevention. METHODS: All fatalities (N=812) resulting from use of lethal force by on-duty LE from 2009 to 2012 in 17 U.S. states were examined using National Violent Death Reporting System data...
November 2016: American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Denise D Walker, Thomas O Walton, Clayton Neighbors, Debra Kaysen, Lyungai Mbilinyi, Jolee Darnell, Lindsey Rodriguez, Roger A Roffman
Objective: Alcohol use disorders (AUDs) are prevalent in the military and are a major public health concern. Although efficacious AUD interventions exist, few service members seek treatment. Army-specific barriers to AUD treatment include treatment being recorded on health records, command being notified of participation, and perceptions that seeking treatment would interfere with promotion or retention in the military. Evaluate a telephone delivered motivational interviewing plus feedback (MIF) intervention designed to attract self-referral and reduce substance use from active-duty military with untreated AUD...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Stéphanie Vincent Lyk-Jensen, Cecilie Dohlmann Weatherall, Peter Winning Jepsen
Public concern about soldiers' mental health has increased over the last decade. Yet the large literature on the mental health problems of returning soldiers relies primarily on self-reported measures that may suffer from non-response bias, usually refers to older conflicts, and focuses mainly on specific diagnoses such as PTSD. Another challenge is that the differences between soldiers and non-soldiers are not necessarily causal, instead possibly reflecting an underlying propensity towards active military service...
September 30, 2016: Economics and Human Biology
Navid Ghaffarzadegan, Alireza Ebrahimvandi, Mohammad S Jalali
Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) stands out as a major mental illness; however, little is known about effective policies for mitigating the problem. The importance and complexity of PTSD raise critical questions: What are the trends in the population of PTSD patients among military personnel and veterans in the postwar era? What policies can help mitigate PTSD? To address these questions, we developed a system dynamics simulation model of the population of military personnel and veterans affected by PTSD...
2016: PloS One
Judith Harbertson, Braden R Hale, Nelson L Michael, Paul T Scott
BACKGROUND: Depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are significant risks for suicide and other adverse events among US military personnel, but prevalence data among ship-assigned personnel at the onset of deployment are unknown. AIMS: To determine the prevalence of shipboard personnel who screen positive for PTSD and/or major depressive disorder (MDD) at the onset of deployment, and also those who reported these diagnoses made by a physician or healthcare professional in the year prior to deployment...
September 2016: BJPsych Open
Ellen R DeVoe, Ruth Paris, Ben Emmert-Aronson, Abigail Ross, Michelle Acker
Objective: Parenting through the deployment cycle presents unique stressors for military families. To date, few evidence-based and military-specific parenting programs are available to support parenting through cycles of deployment separation and reintegration, especially for National Guard/Reserve members. The purpose of this research was to test the efficacy of a parenting program developed specifically to support military families during reintegration. Method: Within 1 year of returning from deployment to Afghanistan or Iraq, 115 service members with very young children were randomly assigned to receive either the Strong Families Strong Forces Parenting Program at baseline or after a 12-week waiting period...
October 6, 2016: Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice and Policy
David Forbes, Meaghan O'Donnell, Rachel M Brand, Sam Korn, Mark Creamer, Alexander C McFarlane, Malcolm R Sim, Andrew B Forbes, Graeme Hawthorne
BACKGROUND: The mental health outcomes of military personnel deployed on peacekeeping missions have been relatively neglected in the military mental health literature. AIMS: To assess the mental health impacts of peacekeeping deployments. METHOD: In total, 1025 Australian peacekeepers were assessed for current and lifetime psychiatric diagnoses, service history and exposure to potentially traumatic events (PTEs). A matched Australian community sample was used as a comparator...
January 2016: BJPsych Open
Carolyn L Deans, Emma L Little
CONTEXT: This article explores the relevance of the body of military psychology knowledge to the management and support of those living and working in rural/remote industries and locations, particularly within Australia. ISSUES: For those who live and work in rural/remote settings, there are social, occupational, health and environmental challenges. Some of these are shared with families and individuals who are associated with military life. The published literature on the shared attributes between military and rural/remote work environments rarely makes a direct link...
October 2016: Rural and Remote Health
Judith Teich, Mir M Ali, Sean Lynch, Ryan Mutter
PURPOSE: There is concern that veterans living in rural areas may not be receiving the mental health (MH) treatment they need. This study uses recent national survey data to examine the utilization of MH treatment among military veterans with a MH condition living in rural areas, providing comparisons with estimates of veterans living in urban areas. METHODS: Multivariable logistic regression is utilized to examine differences in MH service use by urban/rural residence, controlling for other factors...
October 4, 2016: Journal of Rural Health
Yu-Chu Shen, Jesse M Cunha, Thomas V Williams
BACKGROUND: US military suicides have increased substantially over the past decade and currently account for almost 20% of all military deaths. We investigated the associations of a comprehensive set of time-varying risk factors with suicides among current and former military service members. METHODS: We did a retrospective multivariate analysis of all US military personnel between 2001 and 2011 (n=110 035 573 person-quarter-years, representing 3 795 823 service members)...
September 30, 2016: Lancet Psychiatry
Darryl Wade, Louise Mewton, Tracey Varker, Andrea Phelps, David Forbes
OBJECTIVE: The study investigated the impact of potentially traumatic events on mental health outcomes among males who had ever served in the Australian Defence Force. METHOD: Data from a nationally representative household survey of Australian residents, the 2007 National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing, were used for this study. RESULTS: Compared with community members, Australian Defence Force males were significantly more likely to have experienced not only deployment and other war-like events but also accidents or other unexpected events, and trauma to someone close...
September 30, 2016: Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
Janet R Kahn, William Collinge, Robert Soltysik
BACKGROUND: Veterans with history of deployment in the Global War on Terror face significant and ongoing challenges with high prevalences of adverse psychological, physical, spiritual, and family impacts. Together, these challenges contribute to an emerging public health crisis likely to extend well into the future. Innovative approaches are needed that reach veterans and their family members with strategies they can employ over time in their daily lives to promote improved adjustment and well-being...
2016: Journal of Medical Internet Research
Crystal L Park, Lucy Finkelstein-Fox, David M Barnes, Carolyn M Mazure, Rani Hoff
OBJECTIVES: Because the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing among veterans, understanding more about the characteristics of veterans who use CAM is increasingly important. Studies reporting on predictors of use almost always discuss CAM in the aggregate, yet each CAM modality represents a unique approach to healthcare, and each may have different correlates as well as different effectiveness. Very little information is available about veterans' use of each distinct modality, and about psychosocial correlates of various forms of CAM use...
October 2016: Complementary Therapies in Medicine
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