Read by QxMD icon Read


Leah Hobert, Emanuela Binello
Trepanation, the process of making a burr hole in the skull to access the brain, is an ancient form of a primitive craniotomy. There is widespread evidence of contributions made to this practice by ancient civilizations in Europe, Africa, and South America, where archaeologists have unearthed thousands of trepanned skulls dating back to the Neolithic period. Little is known about trepanation in China, and it is commonly believed that the Chinese only used traditional Chinese medicine and nonsurgical methods for treating brain injuries...
October 18, 2016: World Neurosurgery
Ismael Apud, Oriol Romaní
Ayahuasca is a psychoactive beverage from the Amazon, traditionally used by indigenous and mestizo populations in the region. Widespread international use of the beverage began in the 1990s in both secular contexts and religious/spiritual networks. This article offers an analysis of these networks as health care systems in general and for the case of Spain and specifically Catalonia, describing the emergence and characteristics of their groups, and the therapeutic itineraries of some participants. The medical anthropology perspective we take enables us to reflect on the relationship between medicine and religion, and problematize the tensions between medicalization and medical pluralism...
October 18, 2016: International Journal on Drug Policy
Shane Sinclair, Reanne Booker, Tak Fung, Shelley Raffin-Bouchal, Bert Enns, Kate Beamer, Naree Ager
PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To examine the relationships between spiritual, religious, and sociodemographic factors and post-traumatic growth, quality of life, and spiritual well-being in outpatients undergoing bone marrow and/or stem cell transplantation (BMSCT).
. DESIGN: Cross-sectional, descriptive, exploratory.
. SETTING: Outpatient bone marrow transplantation clinic at the Tom Baker Cancer Centre in Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
. SAMPLE: 100 patients (21 pre-BMSCT and 79 post-BMSCT) accrued consecutively via non-probability sampling...
November 1, 2016: Oncology Nursing Forum
Stephen J Hile, Matthew B Feldman, Amanda R Raker, Mary K Irvine
PURPOSE: To collect information that will inform the development of an intervention to support the maintenance of HIV-related health-promoting behaviors. DESIGN: Focused, in-depth individual and group interviews. SETTING: The New York City (NYC) Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) and DOHMH-funded community-based organizations that primarily serve low-income people living with HIV within the five boroughs of NYC. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 42 individuals who had participated in The Positive Life Workshop-an HIV self-management intervention adapted and implemented by the NYC DOHMH...
October 20, 2016: American Journal of Health Promotion: AJHP
David Glenister, Martin Prewer
Objective Most major Victorian hospitals include religious identity in routine admission demographic questions. However, approximately 20% of admissions do not have their religious identity recorded. At the Royal Melbourne Hospital this missing 20% was surveyed throughout 2014-15 for two reasons: (1) to enable patient care; and (2) to provide an insight into the significance of religious identity for patients. There is scarce literature on this subject, so the present mixed-methods study, including a qualitative component, will start to bridge the gap...
October 21, 2016: Australian Health Review: a Publication of the Australian Hospital Association
Sally P Weinrich, Jill E Bormann, Dale Glaser, Sally Hardin, Mary Barger, Cabiria Lizarraga, Juan Del Rio, Carolyn B Allard
Women and families are the fastest growing segment of the homeless population. Negative attitudes of nurses toward homeless women are a major barrier to homeless women seeking health care. This cross-sectional, mixed-methods pilot study, conducted primarily by nurses, tested the Mantram Repetition Program for the first time with 29 homeless women. The Mantram Repetition Program is a spiritually based skills training that teaches mantram (sacred word) repetition as a cost-effective, personalized, portable, and focused strategy for reducing stress and improving well-being...
November 2016: Holistic Nursing Practice
F Nikseresht, M Rassouli, F Torabi, F Farzinfard, S Mansouri, M Ilkhani
This study measured the effect of spiritual care on mental health in mothers of children with cancer. The present quasi-experimental study was with one group pretest posttest design. The findings show that implementation of spiritual care in mothers of children with cancer can improve their mental health.
November 2016: Holistic Nursing Practice
Regina Conway-Phillips, Linda Witek Janusek
The purpose of this qualitative study was to gain understanding of the definition, meaning, and function of spirituality to African American women. Four categories emerged that add insight for nurses to develop innovative spiritual-based strategies to promote African American women's positive health behaviors. Implications for promoting breast health behaviors are described.
November 2016: Holistic Nursing Practice
José Luis Díaz, César Leal, Klaus Schriewer, Paloma Echevarría
Amputation is a traumatic incident that entails a chain of psychological, physical, and social events. The objectives of the study are to describe the beliefs and the philosophies of life related to the experience of suffering of traumatic amputees, analyze the importance of biomedical care, and describe other forms of care used.
November 2016: Holistic Nursing Practice
Philip Kime
Nina Coltart's freedom in addressing delicate areas such as spirituality and Buddhism within a psychoanalytic framework has opened borders between different psychoanalytic communities. This paper sets out to identify a deep-rooted philosophical tension that runs through several aspects of Coltart's work starting from her 'Slouching towards Bethlehem … or, thinking the unthinkable in psychoanalysis'. In exploring this central topic in depth psychology, of the distinction between thinkable and unthinkable contents, the author argues that it is not a fundamental distinction in Coltart's work but is rather a particular example of a more fundamental structural dichotomy which pervades her approach and which manifests in several different guises...
November 2016: Journal of Analytical Psychology
David Sagar, Marcus West
This paper explores the process of psychological and spiritual development through a series of active imaginations arising from the author's 'psycho-spiritual quest', a process of transformation in which the individual progressively frees themselves from the ego's identifications and may be afforded a vision of the 'self as consciousness', as described by Vedanta. The author describes how this quest was facilitated by the disciplines of Transcendental Meditation, Jungian analysis and Vedanta, and how these three disciplines can work together to foster psycho-spiritual development...
November 2016: Journal of Analytical Psychology
Craig N Sawchuk, Emily Van Dyke, Adam Omidpanah, Joan E Russo, Ursula Tsosie, Jack Goldberg, Dedra Buchwald
INTRODUCTION: Cancer is among the leading causes of death in American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs), with rates increasing over the last two decades. Barriers in accessing cancer screening and treatment likely contribute to this situation. METHODS: We administered structured clinical interviews and conducted descriptive and multiple linear regression analyses of demographic, health, spiritual, and treatment factors associated with self-reported barriers to cancer care among 143 adult AI/AN oncology patients...
2016: Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
John R Broughton, Herenia P Lawrence, Lisa Jamieson
: Early childhood caries is a global health issue for Indigenous populations. The study, "Reducing disease burden and health inequalities arising from chronic dental disease among Indigenous children: an early childhood caries intervention," is being conducted in Australia, Canada, and Aotearoa/New Zealand. OBJECTIVE: To conduct the research in New Zealand using a kaupapa Māori (Māori philosophy) approach. METHODS: This is a mixed-method study incorporating quantitative and qualitative data whilst acknowledging Māori cultural practices by the utilization of Te Whare Tapa Whā, a model for Māori health and well-being...
2016: Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
David Speed, Ken Fowler
The existing literature addressing Religion and Spirituality supports the idea that attending church is positively associated with health outcomes. However, within this literature there has been an impoverished effort to determine whether the Religiously Unaffiliated will report these positive relationships. Using representative data from Ontario (N = 3620), the relationships between Religious/Spiritual variables (Attendance, Prayer/Meditation, and Religiosity) and health outcomes (Happiness, Self-Rated Health, and Satisfaction with Life) were assessed...
October 19, 2016: Journal of Religion and Health
Betty Ferrell, Elaine Wittenberg, Vanessa Battista, Gay Walker
OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to explore nurse experiences in communication with children about spiritual topics in order to develop training in this area. BACKGROUND: Although spiritual care is essential in pediatric palliative care, few providers receive training about communication with ill children about spirituality. METHODS: Researchers developed a brief survey to prompt nurses to reflect on pediatric palliative care experiences that included spiritual discussions...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Palliative Medicine
Debbie Selby, Dori Seccaraccia, Jim Huth, Kristin Kurrpa, Margaret Fitch
OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to explore healthcare professionals' (HCPs') perception of their role in provision of spiritual care, in addition to attempting to identify a simple question(s) to help identify spiritual distress. BACKGROUND: Spirituality is well recognized as important to whole-person care, particularly in those with terminal illnesses. Understanding the role of front-line providers in the identification and management of spiritual distress, however, remains challenging...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Palliative Medicine
M Utsch
Nowadays, issues of religiosity and spirituality are viewed differently than 50 years ago. Social upheaval, migration and secularization have changed the interpretation of religious meaning but have not made religion obsolete. This article describes the differences between a religious and a secular global view and defines spirituality as attachment to a larger entirety. The resources of spirituality are described and the dangers of fanaticism and fundamentalism should not be neglected. Criteria for healthy belief are compared to religious delusion...
October 17, 2016: Der Nervenarzt
Lorna Awo Renner, Deborah McGill
BACKGROUND: Developing countries such as Ghana have very poor childhood cancer survival rates. There is a need to determine reasons for late presentation and treatment abandonment which are major causes of poor survival. Understanding these issues could inform effective strategies for childhood cancer control in resource-constrained settings. AIM: To explore factors influencing parental decision-making for children with cancer in Ghana with regard to health seeking and retention in treatment, in order to provide information that will guide Public Health interventions for childhood cancer control...
September 2016: Ghana Medical Journal
Marta Dąbrowska-Bender, Magdalena Milewska, Aleksandra Gołąbek, Aneta Duda-Zalewska, Anna Staniszewska
BACKGROUND: Cerebral stroke is the major cause of disability in the modern world and, given its consequences, poses serious medical and social problems. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the quality of life of patients who suffered from an ischemic cerebral stroke with respect to various areas of life, including, in particular, clinical and psychoemotional factors. The study hypothesis states that the poststroke quality of life is reduced in the general context as well as in the context of specific areas of life...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases: the Official Journal of National Stroke Association
Michael B Berg, Avi Anshika
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the health locus of control (HLOC) beliefs of patients and visitors at a free, state-run medical clinic in Faridabad, India, in order to establish a norm for this population and to explore potential associations between the different categories of causal health beliefs. DESIGN: Participants (110 men, 96 women) were interviewed in Hindi and asked a shortened version of the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale assessing both internal HLOC and three aspects of external HLOC (chance, powerful others, and God)...
October 14, 2016: Ethnicity & Health
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"