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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29145844/development-and-evaluation-of-an-interferon-gamma-assay-for-the-diagnosis-of-tuberculosis-in-red-deer-experimentally-infected-with-mycobacterium-bovis
#1
María Ángeles Risalde, Jobin Thomas, Iker Sevilla, Miriam Serrano, Jose Antonio Ortíz, Joseba Garrido, Mercedes Domínguez, Lucas Domínguez, Christian Gortázar, Jose Francisco Ruíz-Fons
BACKGROUND: Red deer (Cervus elaphus) is regarded as an epidemiologically relevant host for Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) and closely related members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex that cause animal tuberculosis (TB). The standard antemortem screening test for the detection of TB in deer is the intradermal tuberculin skin test, but the detection of interferon-gamma (IFNγ) produced by white blood cells exposed to M. bovis antigens can be used as an alternative or supplemental assay in most TB eradication/control programs...
November 16, 2017: BMC Veterinary Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29142761/aeromonas-hydrophila-utilizes-tlr4-topology-for-synchronous-activation-of-myd88-and-trif-to-orchestrate-anti-inflammatory-responses-in-zebrafish
#2
Nidhi Srivastava, Asha Shelly, Manmohan Kumar, Archana Pant, Bhabatosh Das, Tanmay Majumdar, Shibnath Mazumder
Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) plays a critical role in host immunity against Gram-negative bacteria. It transduces signals through two distinct TIR-domain-containing adaptors, MyD88 and TRIF, which function at the plasma membrane and endosomes, respectively. Using zebrafish Aeromonas hydrophila infection model, we demonstrate that synchronization of MyD88 and TRIF dependent pathways is critical for determining the fate of infection. Zebrafish were infected with A. hydrophila, and bacterial recovery studies suggested its effective persistence inside the host...
2017: Cell Death Discovery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29136157/depletion-of-recombination-specific-co-factors-by-the-c-terminal-mutant-of-the-activation-induced-cytidine-deaminase-causes-the-dominant-negative-effect-on-class-switch-recombination
#3
Azza Al Ismail, Afzal Husain, Maki Kobayashi, Tasuku Honjo, Nasim A Begum
Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential for class-switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) of immunoglobulin (Ig) genes. Studies on in vitro mutagenized AID as well as its mutations in human patients with Hyper-IgM (HIGM)-syndrome type II revealed that C-terminal AID mutations were defective in CSR whereas their DNA cleavage and SHM activities remained intact. The C-terminal mutants of AID were speculated to exert the dominant negative effect on wild type WT AID whereas its mechanism remains unknown...
November 10, 2017: International Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29122947/phosphorylation-promotes-activation-induced-cytidine-deaminase-activity-at-the-myc-oncogene
#4
Yunxiang Mu, Monika A Zelazowska, Kevin M McBride
Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is a mutator enzyme that targets immunoglobulin (Ig) genes to initiate antibody somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR). Off-target AID association also occurs, which causes oncogenic mutations and chromosome rearrangements. However, AID occupancy does not directly correlate with DNA damage, suggesting that factors beyond AID association contribute to mutation targeting. CSR and SHM are regulated by phosphorylation on AID serine38 (pS38), but the role of pS38 in off-target activity has not been evaluated...
November 9, 2017: Journal of Experimental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29119002/mechanisms-of-liver-disease-in-patients-infected-with-hiv
#5
REVIEW
Matthew B Kaspar, Richard K Sterling
Objective: To describe the various mechanisms of liver disease in patients with HIV infection, and to link these mechanisms to disease states which may utilise them. Background: Non-AIDS causes of morbidity and mortality are becoming increasingly common in patients chronically infected with HIV. In particular, liver-related diseases have risen to become one of the leading causes of non-AIDS-related death. A thorough understanding of the mechanisms driving the development of liver disease in these patients is essential when evaluating and caring for these patients...
2017: BMJ Open Gastroenterology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29118670/an-overview-of-the-role-of-platelets-in-angiogenesis-apoptosis-and-autophagy-in-chronic-myeloid-leukaemia
#6
REVIEW
Lisa Repsold, Roger Pool, Mohammed Karodia, Gregory Tintinger, Annie Margaretha Joubert
Amongst males, leukaemia is the most common cause of cancer-related death in individuals younger than 40 years of age whereas in female children and adolescents, leukaemia is the most common cause of cancer-related death. Chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) is a chronic leukaemia of the haematopoietic stem cells affecting mostly adults. The disease results from a translocation of the Philadelphia chromosome in stem cells of the bone marrow. CML patients usually present with mild to moderate anaemia and with decreased, normal, or increased platelet counts...
2017: Cancer Cell International
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29104110/pseudomyogenic-hemangioendothelioma-of-skin-bone-and-soft-tissue-a-clinicopathological-immunohistochemical-and-fluorescence-in-situ-hybridization-study
#7
Dinesh Pradhan, Karen Schoedel, Richard L McGough, Sarangarajan Ranganathan, Uma N M Rao
Pseudomyogenic hemangioendothelioma (PHE) is an uncommon neoplasm with propensity for local recurrence. The tumor mimics epithelioid hemangioendothelioma and epithelioid sarcoma, representing a possible diagnostic pitfall. We investigated the clinicopathological, immunohistochemical and fluorescence in situ hybridization features of PHEs. Eight cases of PHE were retrieved from our pathology archives. The clinical and outcome information was available in six patients. In six cases the tumors were located in the lower limb while the upper limb was involved in two cases...
November 2, 2017: Human Pathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29073235/src-family-kinases-negatively-regulate-nfat-signaling-in-resting-human-t-cells
#8
Alan Baer, Winston Colon-Moran, Jinhua Xiang, Jack T Stapleton, Nirjal Bhattarai
T cell signaling is required for activation of both natural and therapeutic T cells including chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells. Identification of novel factors and pathways regulating T cell signaling may aid in development of effective T cell therapies. In resting human T cells, the majority of Src-family of tyrosine kinases (SFKs) are inactive due to phosphorylation of a conserved carboxy-terminal tyrosine residue. Recently, a pool of enzymatically active SFKs has been identified in resting T cells; however, the significance of these is incompletely understood...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29054647/pilot-scale-aided-phytoremediation-of-a-co-contaminated-soil
#9
Charlotte Marchand, Michel Mench, Yahya Jani, Fabio Kaczala, Peter Notini, Mohamed Hijri, William Hogland
A pilot scale experiment was conducted to investigate the aided-phytoextraction of metals and the aided-phytodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons (PHC) in a co-contaminated soil. First, this soil was amended with compost (10% w/w) and assembled into piles (Unp-10%C). Then, a phyto-cap of Medicago sativa L. either in monoculture (MS-10%C) or co-cropped with Helianthus annuus L. as companion planting (MSHA-10%C) was sown on the topsoil. Physico-chemical parameters and contaminants in the soil and its leachates were measured at the beginning and the end of the first growth season (after five months)...
October 18, 2017: Science of the Total Environment
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29040604/associations-of-plasma-cytokine-and-microbial-translocation-biomarkers-with-immune-reconstitution-inflammatory-syndrome
#10
Varghese George, Linda Harrison, Margaret Roach, Xiao-Dong Li, Camlin Tierney, Margaret A Fischl, Judith Aberg, Pablo Tebas, David M Asmuth, Richard B Pollard, Catherine Godfrey, Savita Pahwa
A nested case-cohort study was performed in participants of a clinical trial of first-line human immunodeficiency virus treatments to investigate plasma biomarkers of inflammation and microbial translocation for their association with immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). Fifty-one of 1452 participants with baseline CD4 count <350 cells/μL developed IRIS. Plasma from 51 IRIS cases, including 6 stratified by preenrollment CD4 count ≤200 cells/μL, were analyzed and compared to 94 non-IRIS controls...
October 13, 2017: Journal of Infectious Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29031880/assisted-phytoremediation-of-heavy-metal-contaminated-soil-from-a-mined-site-with-typha-latifolia-and-chrysopogon-zizanioides
#11
Alexander Kofi Anning, Ruth Akoto
Chemically assisted phytoremediation is fast gaining attention as a biotechnology to accelerate heavy metal removal from contaminated substrates, but how different chemical amendments affect the process remains an important research question. Here, bioaccumulation factor (BAF), translocation factor (TF), removal efficiency (RE) and uptake of Hg, As, Pb, Cu and Zn by cattail (Typha latifolia) and vetiver (Chrysopogon zizanioides) were quantified in a potted experiment to determine the effects of amendments on the phytoremediation success...
October 12, 2017: Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29031765/an-increased-autophagic-flux-contributes-to-the-anti-inflammatory-potential-of-urolithin-a-in-macrophages
#12
Yaw Duah Boakye, Laura Groyer, Elke H Heiss
BACKGROUND: An extract of Phyllanthus muellerianus and its constituent geraniin have been reported to exert anti-inflammatory activity in vivo. However, orally consumed geraniin, an ellagitannin, shows low bioavailability and undergoes metabolization to urolithins by gut microbiota. This study aimed at comparing geraniin and urolithin A with respect to inhibition of M1 (LPS) polarization of murine J774.1 macrophages and shedding more light on possible underlying mechanisms. METHODS: Photometric, fluorimetric as well as luminescence-based assays monitored production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO), cell viability or reporter gene expression...
January 2018: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29024267/novel-t3ss-effector-esek-in-edwardsiella-piscicida-is-chaperoned-by-esch-and-escs-to-express-virulence
#13
Huifang Cao, Cuiting Yang, Shu Quan, Tianjian Hu, Lingzhi Zhang, Yuanxing Zhang, Dahai Yang, Qin Liu
Bacterium usually utilizes type III secretion systems (T3SS) to deliver effectors directly into host cells with the aids of chaperones. Hence, it is very important to identify bacterial T3SS effectors and chaperones for better understanding of host-pathogen interactions. Edwardsiella piscicida is an invasive enteric bacterium, which infects a wide range of hosts from fish to human. Given E. piscicida encodes a functional T3SS to promote infection, very few T3SS effectors and chaperones have been identified in this bacterium so far...
October 11, 2017: Cellular Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28973849/miscoding-induced-stalling-of-substrate-translocation-on-the-bacterial-ribosome
#14
Jose L Alejo, Scott C Blanchard
Directional transit of the ribosome along the messenger RNA (mRNA) template is a key determinant of the rate and processivity of protein synthesis. Imaging of the multistep translocation mechanism using single-molecule FRET has led to the hypothesis that substrate movements relative to the ribosome resolve through relatively long-lived late intermediates wherein peptidyl-tRNA enters the P site of the small ribosomal subunit via reversible, swivel-like motions of the small subunit head domain within the elongation factor G (GDP)-bound ribosome complex...
October 10, 2017: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28959214/adrenergic-stress-protection-of-human-ips-cell-derived-cardiomyocytes-by-fast-kv7-1-recycling
#15
Ilaria Piccini, Edda Fehrmann, Stefan Frank, Frank U Müller, Boris Greber, Guiscard Seebohm
The fight-or-flight response (FFR), a physiological acute stress reaction, involves positive chronotropic and inotropic effects on heart muscle cells mediated through β-adrenoceptor activation. Increased systolic calcium is required to enable stronger heart contractions whereas elevated potassium currents are to limit the duration of the action potentials and prevent arrhythmia. The latter effect is accomplished by an increased functional activity of the Kv7.1 channel encoded by KCNQ1. Current knowledge, however, does not sufficiently explain the full extent of rapid Kv7...
2017: Frontiers in Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28936406/gut-microbiome-based-therapeutics-in-liver-cirrhosis-basic-consideration-for-the-next-step
#16
REVIEW
Hiroshi Fukui
Infections account for significant morbidity and mortality in liver cirrhosis and most are related to the gut microbiome. Fecal dysbiosis, characterized by an overgrowth of potentially pathogenic bacteria and a decrease in autochthonous non-pathogenic bacteria, becomes prominent with the progression of liver cirrhosis. In cirrhotic patients, disruption of the intestinal barrier causes intestinal hyperpermeability (i.e. leaky gut), which is closely related to gut dysmotility, dysbiosis and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and may induce pathological bacterial translocation...
September 28, 2017: Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28894900/interaction-between-luteinizing-hormone-releasing-hormone-and-gm1-doped-cholesterol-sphingomyelin-vesicles-a-spectroscopic-study
#17
Zarrin Shahzadi, Chaitali Mukhopadhyay
Understanding the role of neural membrane in translocation and action of neurohormone is of great importance. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) is a neuropeptide hormone and it acts as a final signaling molecule by stimulating the synthesis of LH and FSH to maintain reproduction in all vertebrates. The receptors of LHRH are found in breast tumors and pituitary gland in the brain. Moreover, neural plasma membrane is also found to contain specific binding site for LHRH. The mechanism by which LHRH binds to membrane before it binds to the receptors is a very critical step and can have a profound impact upon the translation of peptide across the membrane...
September 11, 2017: Journal of Membrane Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28893288/potential-contribution-of-gut-microbiota-and-systemic-inflammation-on-hiv-vaccine-effectiveness-and-vaccine-design
#18
REVIEW
Jean-Pierre Routy, Vikram Mehraj
The quest for an effective HIV-1 vaccine began as soon as the virus causing AIDS was identified. After several disappointing attempts, results of the Phase-III RV144 trial in Thailand were a beacon of hope for the field demonstrating correlation between protection and immunological markers. In order to optimize vaccine response, we underline results from yellow fever and hepatitis B vaccines, where protective responses were predicted by the pre-vaccination level of immune activation in healthy individuals. Such findings support the assessment and reduction of pre-vaccine immune activation in order to optimize vaccine response...
September 12, 2017: AIDS Research and Therapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28890882/neutrophils-to-the-roscue-mechanisms-of-nadph-oxidase-activation-and-bacterial-resistance
#19
REVIEW
Giang T Nguyen, Erin R Green, Joan Mecsas
Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by NADPH oxidase play an important role in antimicrobial host defense and inflammation. Their deficiency in humans results in recurrent and severe bacterial infections, while their unregulated release leads to pathology from excessive inflammation. The release of high concentrations of ROS aids in clearance of invading bacteria. Localization of ROS release to phagosomes containing pathogens limits tissue damage. Host immune cells, like neutrophils, also known as PMNs, will release large amounts of ROS at the site of infection following the activation of surface receptors...
2017: Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28878823/a-de-novo-complex-chromosome-rearrangement-associated-with-multisystematic-abnormalities-a-case-report
#20
Chan Tian, Dan Li, Ping Liu, Liping Jiao, Xuefeng Gao, Jie Qiao
BACKGROUND: Complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCRs) are constitutional structural rearrangements that involve three or more chromosomes or that have more than two breakpoints. CASE PRESENTATION: Here, we describe a four-way CCR involving chromosomes 4, 5, 6 and 8. The patient had mild multisystematic abnormalities during his development, including defects in his eyes and teeth, exomphalos and asthenozoospermia. His wife had two spontaneous abortions during the first trimester...
2017: Molecular Cytogenetics
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