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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28766042/estimating-population-heat-exposure-and-impacts-on-working-people-in-conjunction-with-climate-change
#1
Tord Kjellstrom, Chris Freyberg, Bruno Lemke, Matthias Otto, David Briggs
Increased environmental heat levels as a result of climate change present a major challenge to the health, wellbeing and sustainability of human communities in already hot parts of this planet. This challenge has many facets from direct clinical health effects of daily heat exposure to indirect effects related to poor air quality, poor access to safe drinking water, poor access to nutritious and safe food and inadequate protection from disease vectors and environmental toxic chemicals. The increasing environmental heat is a threat to environmental sustainability...
August 1, 2017: International Journal of Biometeorology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28748383/is-ambient-heat-exposure-levels-associated-with-miscarriage-or-stillbirths-in-hot-regions-a-cross-sectional-study-using-survey-data-from-the-ghana-maternal-health-survey-2007
#2
Benedict Asamoah, Tord Kjellstrom, Per-Olof Östergren
It is well established that high ambient heat could cause congenital abnormalities resulting in miscarriage or stillbirth among certain species of mammals. However, this has not been systematically studied in real field settings among humans, despite the potential value of such knowledge for estimating the impact of global warming on the human species. This study sought to test the hypothesis that maternal heat exposure during pregnancy in hot regions is associated with increased prevalence of spontaneous abortions or stillbirths and to develop an analytical strategy to use existing data from maternal health surveys and existing data on historical heat levels at a geographic grid cell level...
July 26, 2017: International Journal of Biometeorology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28723820/the-effects-of-cardiovascular-fitness-and-body-composition-on-maximal-core-temperature-in-collegiate-football-players-during-pre-season
#3
JoAnna M McClelland, Sandra Fowkes Godek, Pamela S Chlad, Deborah L Feairheller, Katherine E Morrison
This study evaluated the effects of BMI and aerobic fitness (VO2max) on maximal core temperature values (Tcmax) in 17 NCAA Division III football players during pre-season. The subjects included nine backs (BKs) and eight linemen (LM). VO2max testing was performed one week prior to pre-season. Core temperature was monitored via ingestible sensor every 10 min during practices on day 4(D1), day 5(D2), day 7(D3), and post-acclimatization on day 14(D4). Wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) was recorded on each collection day...
July 14, 2017: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28712114/comparative-evaluation-of-human-heat-stress-indices-on-selected-hospital-admissions-in-sydney-australia
#4
James Goldie, Lisa Alexander, Sophie C Lewis, Steven Sherwood
OBJECTIVE: To find appropriate regression model specifications for counts of the daily hospital admissions of a Sydney cohort and determine which human heat stress indices best improve the models' fit. METHODS: We built parent models of eight daily counts of admission records using weather station observations, census population estimates and public holiday data. We added heat stress indices; models with lower Akaike Information Criterion scores were judged a better fit...
July 16, 2017: Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28691728/intervention-to-diminish-dehydration-and-kidney-damage-among-sugarcane-workers
#5
David H Wegman, Jenny Apelqvist, Matteo Bottai, Ulf Ekström, Ramón García-Trabanino, Jason Glaser, Christer Hogstedt, Kristina Jakobsson, Emmanuel Jarquín, Rebekah A I Lucas, Ilana Weiss, Catharina Wesseling, Theo Bodin
Objective The aim of this study was to assess the potential to reduce kidney function damage during the implementation of a water, rest, shade (WRS) and efficiency intervention program among sugarcane workers. Methods A WRS intervention program adapted from the US Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) coupled with an efficiency program began two months into the 5-month harvest. One of the two groups of workers studied was provided with portable water reservoirs, mobile shaded tents, and scheduled rest periods...
July 7, 2017: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28639035/mitigation-of-pedestrian-heat-stress-using-parasols-in-a-humid-subtropical-region
#6
Shinichi Watanabe, Jin Ishii
Concerns over heat illness have been an increasing social problem in humid subtropical regions. One measure for avoiding excessive heat stress in hot outdoor environments is the use of parasols or umbrellas. The advantage of parasols is that they are a mobile and inexpensive way to provide personal shade outdoors. The objectives of this study were to compare the wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT) under parasols and at an unshaded point as a reference, and to quantify the reduction in WBGT from the use of parasols in a humid subtropical region...
June 21, 2017: International Journal of Biometeorology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28609164/the-recommended-threshold-limit-values-for-heat-exposure-fail-to-maintain-body-core-temperature-within-safe-limits-in-older-working-adults
#7
Dallon T Lamarche, Robert D Meade, Andrew W D'Souza, Andreas D Flouris, Stephen G Hardcastle, Ronald J Sigal, Pierre Boulay, Glen P Kenny
PURPOSE: The American Conference of Governmental and Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) Threshold Limit Values (TLVs) for work in the heat consist of work-rest (WR) allocations designed to ensure a stable core temperature that does not exceed 38°C. However, in their prescription the TLVs have not been validated in older workers. This is an important shortcoming given that older adults as young as 40 years demonstrate impairments in their ability to dissipate heat. We therefore evaluated body temperature responses in older adults during work performed in accordance to the TLVs...
June 13, 2017: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28595332/ability-to-discriminate-between-sustainable-and-unsustainable-heat-stress-exposures-part-1-wbgt-exposure-limits
#8
Ximena P Garzón-Villalba, Yougui Wu, Candi D Ashley, Thomas E Bernard
Objectives: Heat stress exposure limits based on wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT) were designed to limit exposures to those that could be sustained for an 8-h day using limited data from Lind in the 1960s. In general, Sustainable exposures are heat stress levels at which thermal equilibrium can be achieved, and Unsustainable exposures occur when there is a steady increase in core temperature. This paper addresses the ability of the ACGIH® Threshold Limit Value (TLV®) to differentiate between Sustainable and Unsustainable heat exposures, to propose alternative occupational exposure limits, and ask whether an adjustment for body surface area improves the exposure decision...
June 8, 2017: Annals of Work Exposures and Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28584838/evaluating-combined-effect-of-noise-and-heat-on-blood-pressure-changes-among-males-in-climatic-chamber
#9
Habibollah Dehghan, Mohamad Taghi Bastami, Behzad Mahaki
INTRODUCTION: Exposure to noise and heat causes individuals to experience some changes in the function of cardiovascular system in workplaces. This study aimed to find the combined effect of heat and noise on systolic and diastolic types of blood pressure in experimentally controlled conditions. METHODS: This quasi-experimental study was performed with 12 male students in a climatic chamber in 2014. Blood pressure including systolic and diastolic was measured in the following conditions: 15 min after rest in exposure to heat (40°C, relative humidity [RH]: 30%), exposure to noise with 75, 85, and 95 dB rates in thermal comfort condition (22...
2017: Journal of Education and Health Promotion
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28509764/environmental-and-physiological-factors-affect-football-head-impact-biomechanics
#10
Jason P Mihalik, Adam Z Sumrall, Susan W Yeargin, Kevin M Guskiewicz, Kevin B King, Scott C Trulock, Edgar W Shields
PURPOSE: Recent anecdotal trends suggest a disproportionate number of head injuries in collegiate football players occur during preseason football camp. In warmer climates, this season also represents the highest risk for heat-related illness among collegiate football players. Since concussion and heat illnesses share many common symptoms, we need 1) to understand if environmental conditions, body temperature, and hydration status affect head impact biomechanics; and 2) to determine if an in-helmet thermistor could provide a valid measure of gastrointestinal temperature...
May 15, 2017: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28481372/evaluation-of-occupation-hot-exposure-in-industrial-workplaces-in-a-subtropical-country
#11
Yu-Chiao Yang, Ming-Chi Wei, Show-Jen Hong
OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study has been to evaluate the occupational heat exposure of 12 workers at 5 plants in a subtropical country. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The heat stresses and strain on workers in 5 plants were assessed by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 7243 index (wet bulb globe temperature - WBGT) and the ISO 7933 index (maximum allowable exposure time - D<sub>lim</sub>). RESULTS: Results indicated that 42% of the subjects (5 workers) surpassed the WBGT limits...
May 8, 2017: International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28444505/occupational-heat-stress-assessment-and-protective-strategies-in-the-context-of-climate-change
#12
Chuansi Gao, Kalev Kuklane, Per-Olof Östergren, Tord Kjellstrom
Global warming will unquestionably increase the impact of heat on individuals who work in already hot workplaces in hot climate areas. The increasing prevalence of this environmental health risk requires the improvement of assessment methods linked to meteorological data. Such new methods will help to reveal the size of the problem and design appropriate interventions at individual, workplace and societal level. The evaluation of occupational heat stress requires measurement of four thermal climate factors (air temperature, humidity, air velocity and heat radiation); available weather station data may serve this purpose...
April 25, 2017: International Journal of Biometeorology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28440104/the-cut-off-point-for-tympanic-temperature-as-a-heat-strain-index-for-evaluation-of-outdoor-workers-a-field-study
#13
Hamidreza Heidari, Farideh Golbabaei, Aliakbar Shamsipour, Abbas Rahimi Forushani, Abbasali Gaeini
OBJECTIVES: The aims of this study were (a) to assess the agreement coefficient between tympanic temperatures and the most popular and valid heat stress index, wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT), in outdoor environments; (b) to determine a cut-off point for tympanic temperature as a heat strain index for evaluation of outdoor workers. METHODS: 1452 measurements of WBGT index and tympanic temperature were recorded for outdoor workers from nine different climatic regions...
May 2, 2017: International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics: JOSE
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28424950/estimated-work-ability-in-warm-outdoor-environments-depends-on-the-chosen-heat-stress-assessment-metric
#14
Peter Bröde, Dusan Fiala, Bruno Lemke, Tord Kjellstrom
With a view to occupational effects of climate change, we performed a simulation study on the influence of different heat stress assessment metrics on estimated workability (WA) of labour in warm outdoor environments. Whole-day shifts with varying workloads were simulated using as input meteorological records for the hottest month from four cities with prevailing hot (Dallas, New Delhi) or warm-humid conditions (Managua, Osaka), respectively. In addition, we considered the effects of adaptive strategies like shielding against solar radiation and different work-rest schedules assuming an acclimated person wearing light work clothes (0...
April 19, 2017: International Journal of Biometeorology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28344848/occupational-heat-stress-impacts-on-health-and-productivity-in-a-steel-industry-in-southern-india
#15
Manikandan Krishnamurthy, Paramesh Ramalingam, Kumaravel Perumal, Latha Perumal Kamalakannan, Jeremiah Chinnadurai, Rekha Shanmugam, Krishnan Srinivasan, Vidhya Venugopal
BACKGROUND: Workers laboring in steel industries in tropical settings with high ambient temperatures are subjected to thermally stressful environments that can create well-known risks of heat-related illnesses and limit workers' productivity. METHODS: A cross-sectional study undertaken in a steel industry in a city nicknamed "Steel City" in Southern India assessed thermal stress by wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) and level of dehydration from urine color and urine specific gravity...
March 2017: Safety and Health At Work
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28249035/inactivity-sleep-in-two-wild-free-roaming-african-elephant-matriarchs-does-large-body-size-make-elephants-the-shortest-mammalian-sleepers
#16
Nadine Gravett, Adhil Bhagwandin, Robert Sutcliffe, Kelly Landen, Michael J Chase, Oleg I Lyamin, Jerome M Siegel, Paul R Manger
The current study provides details of sleep (or inactivity) in two wild, free-roaming African elephant matriarchs studied in their natural habitat with remote monitoring using an actiwatch subcutaneously implanted in the trunk, a standard elephant collar equipped with a GPS system and gyroscope, and a portable weather station. We found that these two elephants were polyphasic sleepers, had an average daily total sleep time of 2 h, mostly between 02:00 and 06:00, and displayed the shortest daily sleep time of any mammal recorded to date...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28211835/how-many-days-are-required-for-workers-to%C3%A2-acclimatize-to-heat
#17
Tamer Mohamed Khalaf, Mohamed Zaki Ramadan, Riyad A Al-Ashaikh
BACKGROUND: Many research studies require recruiting heat-acclimatized workers to participate in heat-stress experiments and application fields. A reliable heat acclimatization program for workers in countries with hot environments has not been reported yet. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to estimate the effects of heat stress and the amount of acclimatization required in hot-climate countries. METHODS: Eighteen male workers from an industrial population participated in this experiment...
February 17, 2017: Work: a Journal of Prevention, Assessment, and Rehabilitation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28139172/heat-exposure-and-productivity-in-orchards-implications-for-climate-change-research
#18
Grant Quiller, Jennifer Krenz, Kristie Ebi, Jeremy J Hess, Richard A Fenske, Paul D Sampson, Mengjie Pan, June T Spector
Recent studies suggest that heat exposure degrades work productivity, but such studies have not considered individual- and workplace-level factors. Forty-six tree-fruit harvesters (98% Latino/a) from 6 orchards participated in a cross-sectional study in central/eastern Washington in 2015. The association between maximum measured work-shift wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGTmax) and productivity (total weight of fruit bins collected per time worked) was estimated using linear mixed-effects models, adjusting for relevant confounders...
January 31, 2017: Archives of Environmental & Occupational Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27939428/perceived-exertion-is-as-effective-as-the-perceptual-strain-index-in-predicting-physiological-strain-when-wearing-personal-protective-clothing
#19
David N Borg, Joseph T Costello, Aaron J Bach, Ian B Stewart
OBJECTIVE: The perceptual strain index (PeSI) has been shown to overcome the limitations associated with the assessment of the physiological strain index (PSI), primarily the need to obtain a core body temperature measurement. The PeSI uses the subjective scales of thermal sensation and perceived exertion (RPE) to provide surrogate measures of core temperature and heart rate, respectively. Unfortunately, thermal sensation has shown large variability in providing an estimation of core body temperature...
February 1, 2017: Physiology & Behavior
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27930487/influence-of-chronic-heat-acclimatization-on-occupational-thermal-strain-in-tropical-field-conditions
#20
Matt B Brearley, Ian Norton, Daryl Rush, Michael Hutton, Steve Smith, Linda Ward, Hector Fuentes
OBJECTIVE: To examine whether non-heat acclimatized (NHA) emergency responders endure greater physiological and perceptual strain than heat acclimatized (HA) counterparts in tropical field settings. METHODS: Eight HA and eight NHA men urban search and rescue personnel had physiological and perceptual responses compared during the initial 4 hours shift of a simulated disaster in tropical conditions (ambient temperature 34.0 °C, 48% relative humidity, wet bulb globe temperature [WBGT] 31...
December 2016: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
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