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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28509764/environmental-and-physiological-factors-affect-football-head-impact-biomechanics
#1
Jason P Mihalik, Adam Z Sumrall, Susan W Yeargin, Kevin M Guskiewicz, Kevin B King, Scott C Trulock, Edgar W Shields
PURPOSE: Recent anecdotal trends suggest a disproportionate number of head injuries in collegiate football players occur during preseason football camp. In warmer climates, this season also represents the highest risk for heat-related illness among collegiate football players. Since concussion and heat illnesses share many common symptoms, we need 1) to understand if environmental conditions, body temperature, and hydration status affect head impact biomechanics; and 2) to determine if an in-helmet thermistor could provide a valid measure of gastrointestinal temperature...
May 15, 2017: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28481372/evaluation-of-occupation-hot-exposure-in-industrial-workplaces-in-a-subtropical-country
#2
Yu-Chiao Yang, Ming-Chi Wei, Show-Jen Hong
OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study has been to evaluate the occupational heat exposure of 12 workers at 5 plants in a subtropical country. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The heat stresses and strain on workers in 5 plants were assessed by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 7243 index (wet bulb globe temperature - WBGT) and the ISO 7933 index (maximum allowable exposure time - D<sub>lim</sub>). RESULTS: Results indicated that 42% of the subjects (5 workers) surpassed the WBGT limits...
May 8, 2017: International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28444505/occupational-heat-stress-assessment-and-protective-strategies-in-the-context-of-climate-change
#3
Chuansi Gao, Kalev Kuklane, Per-Olof Östergren, Tord Kjellstrom
Global warming will unquestionably increase the impact of heat on individuals who work in already hot workplaces in hot climate areas. The increasing prevalence of this environmental health risk requires the improvement of assessment methods linked to meteorological data. Such new methods will help to reveal the size of the problem and design appropriate interventions at individual, workplace and societal level. The evaluation of occupational heat stress requires measurement of four thermal climate factors (air temperature, humidity, air velocity and heat radiation); available weather station data may serve this purpose...
April 25, 2017: International Journal of Biometeorology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28440104/the-cut-off-point-for-tympanic-temperature-as-a-heat-strain-index-for-evaluation-of-outdoor-workers-a-field-study
#4
Hamidreza Heidari, Farideh Golbabaei, Aliakbar Shamsipour, Abbas Rahimi Forushani, Abbasali Gaeini
INTRODUCTION: The aims of this study were (a) to assess agreement coefficient between tympanic temperatures and the most popular and valid heat stress index, wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT), in outdoor environments and (b) to determine a cut-off point for tympanic temperature as a heat strain index for evaluation of outdoor workers. METHOD: 1452 measurements of WBGT index and tympanic temperature were recorded for outdoor workers from nine different climatic regions...
April 25, 2017: International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics: JOSE
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28424950/estimated-work-ability-in-warm-outdoor-environments-depends-on-the-chosen-heat-stress-assessment-metric
#5
Peter Bröde, Dusan Fiala, Bruno Lemke, Tord Kjellstrom
With a view to occupational effects of climate change, we performed a simulation study on the influence of different heat stress assessment metrics on estimated workability (WA) of labour in warm outdoor environments. Whole-day shifts with varying workloads were simulated using as input meteorological records for the hottest month from four cities with prevailing hot (Dallas, New Delhi) or warm-humid conditions (Managua, Osaka), respectively. In addition, we considered the effects of adaptive strategies like shielding against solar radiation and different work-rest schedules assuming an acclimated person wearing light work clothes (0...
April 19, 2017: International Journal of Biometeorology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28344848/occupational-heat-stress-impacts-on-health-and-productivity-in-a-steel-industry-in-southern-india
#6
Manikandan Krishnamurthy, Paramesh Ramalingam, Kumaravel Perumal, Latha Perumal Kamalakannan, Jeremiah Chinnadurai, Rekha Shanmugam, Krishnan Srinivasan, Vidhya Venugopal
BACKGROUND: Workers laboring in steel industries in tropical settings with high ambient temperatures are subjected to thermally stressful environments that can create well-known risks of heat-related illnesses and limit workers' productivity. METHODS: A cross-sectional study undertaken in a steel industry in a city nicknamed "Steel City" in Southern India assessed thermal stress by wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) and level of dehydration from urine color and urine specific gravity...
March 2017: Safety and Health At Work
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28249035/inactivity-sleep-in-two-wild-free-roaming-african-elephant-matriarchs-does-large-body-size-make-elephants-the-shortest-mammalian-sleepers
#7
Nadine Gravett, Adhil Bhagwandin, Robert Sutcliffe, Kelly Landen, Michael J Chase, Oleg I Lyamin, Jerome M Siegel, Paul R Manger
The current study provides details of sleep (or inactivity) in two wild, free-roaming African elephant matriarchs studied in their natural habitat with remote monitoring using an actiwatch subcutaneously implanted in the trunk, a standard elephant collar equipped with a GPS system and gyroscope, and a portable weather station. We found that these two elephants were polyphasic sleepers, had an average daily total sleep time of 2 h, mostly between 02:00 and 06:00, and displayed the shortest daily sleep time of any mammal recorded to date...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28211835/how-many-days-are-required-for-workers-to%C3%A2-acclimatize-to-heat
#8
Tamer Mohamed Khalaf, Mohamed Zaki Ramadan, Riyad A Al-Ashaikh
BACKGROUND: Many research studies require recruiting heat-acclimatized workers to participate in heat-stress experiments and application fields. A reliable heat acclimatization program for workers in countries with hot environments has not been reported yet. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to estimate the effects of heat stress and the amount of acclimatization required in hot-climate countries. METHODS: Eighteen male workers from an industrial population participated in this experiment...
February 17, 2017: Work: a Journal of Prevention, Assessment, and Rehabilitation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28139172/heat-exposure-and-productivity-in-orchards-implications-for-climate-change-research
#9
Grant Quiller, Jennifer Krenz, Kristie Ebi, Jeremy J Hess, Richard A Fenske, Paul D Sampson, Mengjie Pan, June T Spector
Recent studies suggest that heat exposure degrades work productivity, but such studies have not considered individual- and workplace-level factors. Forty-six tree fruit harvesters (98% Latino/a) from six orchards participated in a cross-sectional study in Central/Eastern Washington in 2015. The association between maximum measured work-shift Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGTmax) and productivity (total weight of fruit bins collected per time worked) was estimated using linear mixed effects models, adjusting for relevant confounders...
January 31, 2017: Archives of Environmental & Occupational Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27939428/perceived-exertion-is-as-effective-as-the-perceptual-strain-index-in-predicting-physiological-strain-when-wearing-personal-protective-clothing
#10
David N Borg, Joseph T Costello, Aaron J Bach, Ian B Stewart
OBJECTIVE: The perceptual strain index (PeSI) has been shown to overcome the limitations associated with the assessment of the physiological strain index (PSI), primarily the need to obtain a core body temperature measurement. The PeSI uses the subjective scales of thermal sensation and perceived exertion (RPE) to provide surrogate measures of core temperature and heart rate, respectively. Unfortunately, thermal sensation has shown large variability in providing an estimation of core body temperature...
February 1, 2017: Physiology & Behavior
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27930487/influence-of-chronic-heat-acclimatization-on-occupational-thermal-strain-in-tropical-field-conditions
#11
Matt B Brearley, Ian Norton, Daryl Rush, Michael Hutton, Steve Smith, Linda Ward, Hector Fuentes
OBJECTIVE: To examine whether non-heat acclimatized (NHA) emergency responders endure greater physiological and perceptual strain than heat acclimatized (HA) counterparts in tropical field settings. METHODS: Eight HA and eight NHA men urban search and rescue personnel had physiological and perceptual responses compared during the initial 4 hours shift of a simulated disaster in tropical conditions (ambient temperature 34.0 °C, 48% relative humidity, wet bulb globe temperature [WBGT] 31...
December 2016: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27900769/influence-of-menstrual-phase-and-arid-vs-humid-heat-stress-on-autonomic-and-behavioural-thermoregulation-during-exercise-in-trained-but-unacclimated-women
#12
Tze-Huan Lei, Stephen R Stannard, Blake G Perry, Zachary J Schlader, James D Cotter, Toby Mündel
KEY POINTS: Despite an attenuated fluctuation in ovarian hormone concentrations in well-trained women, one in two of such women believe their menstrual cycle negatively impacts training and performance. Forthcoming large international events will expose female athletes to hot environments, and studies evaluating aerobic exercise performance in such environments across the menstrual cycle are sparse, with mixed findings. We have identified that autonomic heat loss responses at rest and during fixed-intensity exercise in well-trained women are not affected by menstrual cycle phase, but differ between dry and humid heat...
May 1, 2017: Journal of Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27882829/the-effects-of-heat-stress-on-a-number-of-hematological-parameters-and-levels-of-thyroid-hormones-in-foundry-workers
#13
Sahar Norloei, Mohammad Javad Jafari, Leila Omidi, Soheila Khodakarim, Davood Bashash, Mohammad Bagher Abdollahi, Mina Jafari
The objective of this research was to determine the effects of heat stress on some hematological parameters and thyroid hormones among foundry workers. This study was performed on 25 heat-acclimated subjects while 10 office workers were selected as the control group. Wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) was determined to estimate the heat stress. Blood sampling was conducted before and after the daily work shift. The mean value of the WBGT index was 35 °C. The levels of plasma osmolality (p = 0.04) and white blood cells (p = 0...
November 24, 2016: International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics: JOSE
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27857960/heat-strain-during-military-training-activities-the-dilemma-of-balancing-force-protection-and-operational-capability
#14
Andrew P Hunt, Daniel C Billing, Mark J Patterson, Joanne N Caldwell
Military activities in hot environments pose 2 competing demands: the requirement to perform realistic training to develop operational capability with the necessity to protect armed forces personnel against heat-related illness. To ascertain whether work duration limits for protection against heat-related illness restrict military activities, this study examined the heat strain and risks of heat-related illness when conducting a military activity above the prescribed work duration limits. Thirty-seven soldiers conducted a march (10 km; ∼5...
April 2016: Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27852154/the-influence-of-occupational-heat-exposure-on-cognitive-performance-and-blood-level-of-stress-hormones-a-field-study-report
#15
Adel Mazlomi, Farideh Golbabaei, Somayeh Farhang Dehghan, Marzieh Abbasinia, Somayeh Mahmoud Khani, Mohammad Ansari, Mostafa Hosseini
INTRODUCTION: This article aimed to investigate the effect of heat stress on cognitive performance and the blood concentration of stress hormones among workers of a foundry plant. METHODS: Seventy workers within the exposed (35 people) and unexposed (35 people) groups were studied. The wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) index was measured for heat stress assessment. The cognitive performance tests were conducted using the Stroop color word test (SCWT) before and during working hours...
November 17, 2016: International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics: JOSE
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27779310/exertional-heat-illness-and-acute-injury-related-to-ambient-wet-bulb-globe-temperature
#16
Ximena P Garzon-Villalba, Alfred Mbah, Yougui Wu, Michael Hiles, Hanna Moore, Skai W Schwartz, Thomas E Bernard
BACKGROUND: The Deepwater Horizon disaster cleanup effort provided an opportunity to examine the effects of ambient thermal conditions on exertional heat illness (EHI) and acute injury (AI). METHODS: The outcomes were daily person-based frequencies of EHI and AI. Exposures were maximum estimated WBGT (WBGTmax) and severity. Previous day's cumulative effect was assessed by introducing previous day's WBGTmax into the model. RESULTS: EHI and AI were higher in workers exposed above a WBGTmax of 20°C (RR 1...
December 2016: American Journal of Industrial Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27666953/role-of-work-uniform-in-alleviating-perceptual-strain-among-construction-workers
#17
Yang Yang, Albert Ping-Chuen Chan
This study aims to examine the benefits of wearing a new construction work uniform in real-work settings. A field experiment with a randomized assignment of an intervention group to a newly designed uniform and a control group to a commercially available trade uniform was executed. A total of 568 sets of physical, physiological, perceptual, and microclimatological data were obtained. A linear mixed-effects model (LMM) was built to examine the cause-effect relationship between the Perceptual Strain Index (PeSI) and heat stressors including wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT), estimated workload (relative heart rate), exposure time, trade, workplace, and clothing type...
February 7, 2017: Industrial Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27648423/the-past-and-future-trends-of-heat-stress-based-on-wet-bulb-globe-temperature-index-in-outdoor-environment-of-tehran-city-iran
#18
Majid Habibi Mohraz, Asghar Ghahri, Mehrdad Karimi, Farideh Golbabaei
BACKGROUND: The workers who are working in the open and warm environments are at risk of health effects of climate and heat changes. It is expected that the risk is increase with global warming. This study aimed to investigate the changes of Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT) index in the past and to predict their trend of future changes in Tehran, capital of Iran. METHODS: The meteorological data recorded in Tehran, Iran during the statistical period between 1961 and 2009 were obtained from the Iran Meteorological Organization and based on them, WBGT index was calculated and processed using Man-Kendall correlation test...
June 2016: Iranian Journal of Public Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27633034/heat-stress-and-inadequate-sanitary-facilities-at-workplaces-an-occupational-health-concern-for-women
#19
Vidhya Venugopal, Shanmugam Rekha, Krishnamoorthy Manikandan, Perumal Kamalakkannan Latha, Viswanathan Vennila, Nalini Ganesan, Perumal Kumaravel, Stephen Jeremiah Chinnadurai
BACKGROUND: Health concerns unique to women are growing with the large number of women venturing into different trades that expose them to hot working environments and inadequate sanitation facilities, common in many Indian workplaces. OBJECTIVE: The study was carried out to investigate the health implications of exposures to hot work environments and inadequate sanitation facilities at their workplaces for women workers. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study was conducted with 312 women workers in three occupational sectors in 2014-2015...
2016: Global Health Action
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27632886/comparison-of-esophageal-rectal-and-gastrointestinal-temperatures-during-passive-rest-after-exercise-in-the-heat-the-influence-of-hydration
#20
Yuri Hosokawa, William M Adams, Douglas J Casa
CONTEXT: It is unknown how valid esophageal, rectal, and gastrointestinal temperatures (TES, TRE, and TGI) compare after exercise-induced hyperthermia in various hydration states. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to examine the differences between TES, TRE, and TGI during passive rest following exercise-induced hyperthermia under two different hydration states: euhydrated (EU) and hypohydrated (HY). DESIGN: Randomized-crossover design...
August 24, 2016: Journal of Sport Rehabilitation
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