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Dirk Lindebaum, Deanna Geddes
The aim of this article is to conceptually delineate moral anger from other related constructs. Drawing upon social functional accounts of anger, we contend that distilling the finer nuances of morally motivated anger and its expression can increase the precision with which we examine prosocial forms of anger (e.g., redressing injustice), in general, and moral anger, in particular. Without this differentiation, we assert that (i) moral anger remains theoretically elusive, (ii) that this thwarts our ability to methodologically capture the unique variance moral anger can explain in important work outcomes, and that (iii) this can promote ill-informed organizational policies and practice...
July 2016: Journal of Organizational Behavior
Adrian Loerbroks, Sung-Il Cho, Maureen F Dollard, Jianfang Zou, Joachim E Fischer, Yueying Jiang, Peter Angerer, Raphael M Herr, Jian Li
OBJECTIVE: Epidemiological evidence suggests that work stress is associated with suicidal ideation (SI). However, only few studies in this area have drawn on well-established theoretical work stress models (i.e., the job-demand-control [JDC] model, the effort-reward-imbalance [ERI] model, and the model of organizational injustice [OJ]). Utilization of such models allows though for theory-based assessments and workplace interventions. Since evidence on those models' relationship with suicide-related outcomes is currently inconclusive (with regard to JDC), markedly sparse (OJ) or lacking (ERI), we aimed to provide additional or initial evidence...
November 2016: Journal of Psychosomatic Research
Sara E Grineski, Timothy W Collins, Jayajit Chakraborty, Marilyn Montgomery
Limited systematic comparative knowledge exists about patterns of environmental injustices in exposure to varied natural and technological hazards. To address this gap, we examine how hazard characteristics (i.e., punctuated event/suddenness of onset, frequency/magnitude, and divisibility) influence relationships between race/ethnicity, nativity, socioeconomic status (SES), older age, housing tenure, and residential hazard exposure. Sociodemographic data come from a random sample survey of 602 residents of the tricounty Miami Metropolitan Statistical Area (Florida)...
October 19, 2016: Risk Analysis: An Official Publication of the Society for Risk Analysis
Karen Bell
Gender continues to be a relatively marginal issue in environmental justice debates and yet it remains an important aspect of injustice. To help redress the balance, this article explores women's experience of environmental justice through a review of the existing literature and the author's prior qualitative research, as well as her experience of environmental activism. The analysis confirms that women tend to experience inequitable environmental burdens (distributional injustice); and are less likely than men to have control over environmental decisions (procedural injustice), both of which impact on their health (substantive injustice)...
October 12, 2016: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Maria Gouveia-Pereira, Jorge Vala, Isabel Correia
BACKGROUND: Teachers' legitimacy is central to school functioning. Teachers' justice, whether distributive or procedural, predicts teachers' legitimacy. AIMS: What is still do be found, and constitutes the goal of this paper, is whether unjust treatment by a teacher affects the legitimacy of the teacher differently when the student knows that the teacher was fair to a peer (comparative judgement) or when the student does not have that information (autonomous judgement)...
October 15, 2016: British Journal of Educational Psychology
Fabio Margiotta, Ailish Hannigan, Ather Imran, Dominic Colman Harmon
Chronic pain is a public health concern affecting 20% to 30% of the population of Western countries. Psychological risk factors can worsen chronic pain patients. Themes of perceived injustice (PI) and pain catastrophizing are related to poor clinical outcomes. Particularly, perceived injustice has not been assessed systematically in patients at their first presentation in chronic pain clinics in Ireland. This study aims to assess the Injustice Experience Questionnaire (IEQ)'s internal consistency in the Irish population, assess PI in patients attending a chronic pain clinic in Ireland using the IEQ, investigate pain catastrophizing through the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) and its relationship with IEQ scores, and explore their relationships with self-reported Numeric Pain Rating Scale...
October 13, 2016: Pain Practice: the Official Journal of World Institute of Pain
Jyothi Gupta
The values of occupational therapy are grounded in justice, and its origins in activism and advocacy. Enabling individuals to participate in meaningful occupations to enhance health and well-being was the genesis of the profession that answered a call to justice. Occupational science brought focus to understand humans as occupational beings and made justice more visible in the discourse. A systematic mapping review was undertaken to deconstruct how notions of occupational justice (OJ) have been woven in the literature...
October 12, 2016: OTJR: Occupation, Participation and Health
Subhashis Basu, Hasan Qayyum, Suzanne Mason
INTRODUCTION: Occupational stress is a major modern health and safety challenges. While the ED is known to be a high-pressure environment, the specific organisational stressors which affect ED staff have not been established. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review of literature examining the sources of organisational stress in the ED, their link to adverse health outcomes and interventions designed to address them. A narrative review of contextual factors that may contribute to occupational stress was also performed...
October 11, 2016: Emergency Medicine Journal: EMJ
Kaitlyn Hornik, Bethany Cutts, Andrew Greenlee
Environmental justice and sustainability are compatible lenses, yet action toward equity is often missing from urban sustainability initiatives. This study aims to assess the cohesion of these frameworks in practice. To do this, we parse individuals' theories of change, or how they identify and propose to resolve environmental injustices in the pursuit of sustainability. We posit that these theories of change are comprised of three main components: (1) perceived environmental benefits and burdens; (2) the causal pathways of environmental and social injustice; and (3) visions for positive change...
September 30, 2016: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Carla Campbell, Rachael Greenberg, Deepa Mankikar, Ronald D Ross
The failure by the city of Flint, Michigan to properly treat its municipal water system after a change in the source of water, has resulted in elevated lead levels in the city's water and an increase in city children's blood lead levels. Lead exposure in young children can lead to decrements in intelligence, development, behavior, attention and other neurological functions. This lack of ability to provide safe drinking water represents a failure to protect the public's health at various governmental levels...
2016: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Lisa M McKenzie, William B Allshouse, Troy Burke, Benjamin D Blair, John L Adgate
We evaluated population size and factors influencing environmental justice near oil and gas (O&G) wells. We mapped nearest O&G well to residential properties to evaluate population size, temporal relationships between housing and O&G development, and 2012 housing market value distributions in three major Colorado O&G basins. We reviewed land use, building, real estate, and state O&G regulations to evaluate distributive and participatory justice. We found that by 2012 at least 378,000 Coloradans lived within 1 mile of an active O&G well, and this population was growing at a faster rate than the overall population...
October 13, 2016: Environmental Science & Technology
Jeffrey L Crabtree, Jarrod M Wall, David Ohm
There is little information about prison-related occupational deprivation, and about doing research in prison. To document an occupational therapist and two prisoners' critical reflections on an informal occupational therapy education program using participatory action research (PAR), we reflect on our combined experiences of evaluating an occupational therapy program. The reflections include articulation of power differentials and examples of occupational deprivation and injustice at every stage of the program evaluation process...
September 19, 2016: OTJR: Occupation, Participation and Health
Jenny A Higgins, Renee D Kramer, Kristin M Ryder
Long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) is effective and acceptable. However, concern exists about potential provider bias in LARC promotion. No study has documented contraceptive users' attitudes toward or experiences with provider influence and bias regarding LARC. We collected qualitative data in 2014 to address this gap. Participants were 50 young adult women with any history of contraceptive use (including LARC) in Dane County, Wisconsin. Women often described providers as a trusted source of contraceptive information...
November 2016: American Journal of Public Health
Ivy Shiue
Rarely do we know the perception toward neighbourhoods in people specifically with health conditions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to understand the perception toward neighbourhoods among adults with a series of the existing health conditions in a country-wide and population-based setting. Data were retrieved from and analysed in Scottish Household Survey, 2007-2008. Information on demographics, self-reported health conditions and perception toward neighbourhoods and the surrounding facilities was obtained by household interview...
September 14, 2016: Environmental Science and Pollution Research International
Jihyun Emma Choi PhD, Sang-Bum Hong Md PhD, Kyung-Hyun Do Md PhD, Hwa Jung Kim Md PhD, Seockhoon Chung Md PhD, Eun Lee Md PhD, Jihyun Choi, Soo-Jong Hong
A large portion of the Korean population has been exposed to toxic humidifier disinfectants, and considering that the majority of the victims are infants, the magnitude of the damage is expected to be considerably larger than what has currently been revealed. The current victims are voicing problems caused by various diseases, including but not limited to lung, upper respiratory tract, cardiovascular, kidney, musculoskeletal, eye, and skin diseases, etc. However, there has been difficulty in gaining validation for these health problems and identifying causal relationships due to lack of evidence proving that toxic humidifier disinfectant is the specific causes of extrapulmonary diseases such as allergic rhinitis...
August 29, 2016: Environmental Health and Toxicology
Louise Barrett
Modern psychology has, to all intents and purposes, become synonymous with cognitive psychology, with an emphasis on the idea that the brain is a form of computer, whose job is to take in sensory input, process information, and produce motor output. This places the brain at a remove from both the body and environment and denies the intimate connection that exists between them. As a result, a great injustice is done to both human and nonhuman animals: On the one hand, we fail to recognize the distinctive nature of nonhuman cognition, and on the other hand, we continue to promote a somewhat misleading view of human psychological capacities...
May 2016: Behavior Analyst
Delese Wear, Joseph Zarconi, Julie M Aultman, Michelle R Chyatte, Arno K Kumagai
Recent attention to racial disparities in law enforcement, highlighted by the death of Freddie Gray, raises questions about whether medical education adequately prepares physicians to care for persons particularly affected by societal inequities and injustice who present to clinics, hospitals, and emergency rooms. In this Perspective, the authors propose that medical school curricula should address such concerns through an explicit pedagogical orientation. The authors detail two specific approaches-antiracist pedagogy and the concept of structural competency-to construct a curriculum oriented toward appropriate care for patients who are victimized by extremely challenging social and economic disadvantages and who present with health concerns that arise from these disadvantages...
August 30, 2016: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
P Niclas Broer, Hillary E Jenny, Joshua S Ng-Kamstra, Sabrina Juran
In September 2015, the international community came together to agree on the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, a plan of action for people, the planet, and prosperity. Ambitious and far-reaching as they are, they are built on three keystones: the elimination of extreme poverty, fighting climate change, and a commitment to fighting injustice and inequality. Critical to the achievement of the Agenda is the global realization of access to safe, affordable surgical and anesthesia care when needed. The landmark report by the Lancet Commission on Global Surgery estimated that between 28 and 32 percent of the global burden of disease is amenable to surgical treatment...
May 2016: World Journal of Plastic Surgery
A K Tay, S Rees, Z Steel, B Liddell, A Nickerson, N Tam, D Silove
AIMS: Grief symptoms and a sense of injustice may be interrelated responses amongst persons exposed to mass conflict and both reactions may contribute to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. As yet, however, there is a dearth of data examining these relationships. Our study examined the contributions of grief and a sense of injustice to a model of PTSD symptoms that included the established determinants of trauma events, ongoing adversity and severe psychological distress. The study involved a large population sample (n = 2964, response rate: 82...
August 30, 2016: Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences
Azgad Gold, Rael D Strous
Extreme intentional and deliberate violence against innocent people, including acts of terror and school shootings, poses various ethical challenges, some related to the practice of medicine. We discuss a dilemma relating to deliberate violence, in this case the aftermath of a terror attack, in which there are multiple injured individuals, including the terror perpetrator. Normally, the priority of medical treatment is determined based on need. However, in the case of a terror attack, there is reason to question this...
August 29, 2016: Journal of Medical Ethics
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