Read by QxMD icon Read

genetic expansion

Daniel M Bear, Jean-Marc Lassance, Hopi E Hoekstra, Sandeep Robert Datta
Evolution sculpts the olfactory nervous system in response to the unique sensory challenges facing each species. In vertebrates, dramatic and diverse adaptations to the chemical environment are possible because of the hierarchical structure of the olfactory receptor (OR) gene superfamily: expansion or contraction of OR subfamilies accompanies major changes in habitat and lifestyle; independent selection on OR subfamilies can permit local adaptation or conserved chemical communication; and genetic variation in single OR genes can alter odor percepts and behaviors driven by precise chemical cues...
October 24, 2016: Current Biology: CB
Matthew D Keefe, Joshua L Bonkowsky
There has been a rapid expansion in use of transgenic technologies in zebrafish. We report a novel example of trans-interactions of genetic elements, or transvection. This interaction led to a novel expression pattern and illustrates a precautionary example regarding use of transgenes in zebrafish.
October 25, 2016: Zebrafish
Yadéeh E Sawyer, Joseph A Cook
Quaternary climate fluctuations restructured biodiversity across North American high latitudes through repeated episodes of range contraction, population isolation and divergence, and subsequent expansion. Identifying how species responded to changing environmental conditions not only allows us to explore the mode and tempo of evolution in northern taxa, but also provides a basis for forecasting future biotic response across the highly variable topography of western North America. Using a multilocus approach under a Bayesian coalescent framework, we investigated the phylogeography of a wide-ranging mammal, the long-tailed vole, Microtus longicaudus...
September 2016: Ecology and Evolution
Ronan Becheler, Constance Xhaard, Etienne K Klein, Katherine J Hayden, Pascal Frey, Stéphane De Mita, Fabien Halkett
The genetic consequences of range expansions have generally been investigated at wide geographical and temporal scales, long after the colonization event. A unique ecological system enabled us to both monitor the colonization dynamics and decipher the genetic footprints of expansion over a very short time period. Each year an epidemic of the poplar rust (Melampsora larici-populina) expands clonally and linearly along the Durance River, in the Alps. The colonization dynamics observed in 2004 showed two phases with different genetic outcomes...
September 2016: Ecology and Evolution
Katrien H P Van Petegem, David Renault, Robby Stoks, Dries Bonte
Despite an increasing number of studies documenting life-history evolution during range expansions or shifts, we lack a mechanistic understanding of the underlying physiological processes. In this explorative study, we used a metabolomics approach to study physiological changes associated with the recent range expansion of the two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae). Mite populations were sampled along a latitudinal gradient from range core to edge and reared under benign common garden conditions for two generations...
September 2016: Ecology and Evolution
Shilpa Nagaraju, Naomi Kathleen Davies, David Jeffrey Fraser Walker, Michael Köpke, Séan Dennis Simpson
BACKGROUND: Impactful greenhouse gas emissions abatement can now be achieved through gas fermentation using acetogenic microbes for the production of low-carbon fuels and chemicals. However, compared to traditional hosts like Escherichia coli or yeast, only basic genetic tools exist for gas-fermenting acetogens. To advance the process, a robust genetic engineering platform for acetogens is essential. RESULTS: In this study, we report scarless genome editing of an industrially used model acetogen, Clostridium autoethanogenum, using the CRISPR/Cas9 system...
2016: Biotechnology for Biofuels
Sandra Goebbels, Georg L Wieser, Alexander Pieper, Sonia Spitzer, Bettina Weege, Kuo Yan, Julia M Edgar, Oleksandr Yagensky, Sven P Wichert, Amit Agarwal, Khalad Karram, Nicolas Renier, Marc Tessier-Lavigne, Moritz J Rossner, Ragnhildur Thóra Káradóttir, Klaus-Armin Nave
The molecular trigger of CNS myelination is unknown. By targeting Pten in cerebellar granule cells and activating the AKT1-mTOR pathway, we increased the caliber of normally unmyelinated axons and the expression of numerous genes encoding regulatory proteins. This led to the expansion of genetically wild-type oligodendrocyte progenitor cells, oligodendrocyte differentiation and de novo myelination of parallel fibers. Thus, a neuronal program dependent on the phosphoinositide PI(3,4,5)P3 is sufficient to trigger all steps of myelination...
October 24, 2016: Nature Neuroscience
Jinhu Huang, Jiale Ma, Kexin Shang, Xiao Hu, Yuan Liang, Daiwei Li, Zuowei Wu, Lei Dai, Li Chen, Liping Wang
Streptococcus suis is a previously neglected, newly emerging multidrug-resistant zoonotic pathogen. Mobile genetic elements (MGEs) play a key role in intra- and interspecies horizontal transfer of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) determinants. Although, previous studies showed the presence of several MGEs, a comprehensive analysis of AMR-associated mobilome as well as their interaction and evolution has not been performed. In this study, we presented the AMR-associated mobilome and their insertion hotspots in S...
2016: Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology
Sonia M Suter
Advances in science have made possible the derivation of reproductively viable gametes in vitro from mice. The research on human cells suggests that in vitro gametogenesis ("IVG") with reproductive potential may one day be possible with humans. This technology would allow same-sex couples to have children who are biologically related to both of them; allow single individuals to procreate without the genetic contribution of another individual; and facilitate "multiplex" parenting, where groups of more than two individuals procreate together, producing children who are the genetic progeny of them all...
April 2016: Journal of Law and the Biosciences
Bor L Tang
Hexanucleotide repeat expansion in an intron of Chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72) is the most common genetic cause of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD). While functional haploinsufficiency of C9orf72 resulting from the mutation may play a role in ALS/FTD, the actual cellular role of the protein has been unclear. Recent findings have now shown that C9orf72 physically and functionally interacts with multiple members of the Rab small GTPases family, consequently exerting important influences on cellular membrane traffic and the process of autophagy...
2016: Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience
Madoka Ichikawa-Seki, Minami Tokashiki, Maxwell Nwachukwu Opara, Gabriel Iroh, Kei Hayashi, Uday Mohanta Kumar, Tadashi Itagaki
Fasciola gigantica is considered the major pathogen causing fasciolosis in Africa; however, molecular characterization of this fluke has not been adequately elucidated. It is important to scientifically elucidate the dispersal history of F. gigantica by analyzing its genetic diversity. Fasciola flukes from Nigeria were analyzed using nuclear and mitochondrial DNA markers. A total of 172 Fasciola flukes collected from cattle were identified as F. gigantica because they displayed the F. gigantica fragment pattern in multiplex PCR for the nuclear marker, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (pepck)...
October 19, 2016: Parasitology International
Agnieszka Fiszer, Marianna E Ellison-Klimontowicz, Wlodzimierz J Krzyzosiak
Polyglutamine (polyQ) diseases comprise a group of nine genetic disorders that are caused by the expansion of the CAG triplet repeat, which encodes glutamine, in unrelated single genes. Various oligonucleotide (ON)-based therapeutic approaches have been considered for polyQ diseases. The very attractive CAG repeat-targeting strategy offers selective silencing of the mutant allele by directly targeting the mutation site. CAG repeat-targeting miRNA-like siRNAs have been shown to specifically inhibit the mutant gene expression, and their characteristic feature is the formation of mismatches in their interactions with the target site...
October 21, 2016: Acta Biochimica Polonica
Khursheed Ahmad, Ved P Kumar, Bheem Dutt Joshi, Mohamed Raza, Parag Nigam, Anzara Anjum Khan, Surendra P Goyal
BACKGROUND: The Tibetan antelope (Pantholops hodgsonii), or chiru, is an endangered antelope, distributed in China [Xinjiang, Xizang, Qinghai, Zhuolaihu Lake (Breeding habitat)], and India (Aksai Chin and Ladakh). There is a global demand for the species prized wool, which is used in weaving shahtoosh shawls. Over the years, the population of the Tibetan antelope has drastically declined from more than a million to a few thousand individuals, mainly due to poaching. Field studies undertaken in Ladakh, India also indicated winter migration of the population to Tibet...
October 21, 2016: BMC Research Notes
Diyendo Massilani, Silvia Guimaraes, Jean-Philip Brugal, E Andrew Bennett, Malgorzata Tokarska, Rose-Marie Arbogast, Gennady Baryshnikov, Gennady Boeskorov, Jean-Christophe Castel, Sergey Davydov, Stéphane Madelaine, Olivier Putelat, Natalia N Spasskaya, Hans-Peter Uerpmann, Thierry Grange, Eva-Maria Geigl
BACKGROUND: Climatic and environmental fluctuations as well as anthropogenic pressure have led to the extinction of much of Europe's megafauna. The European bison or wisent (Bison bonasus), one of the last wild European large mammals, narrowly escaped extinction at the onset of the 20th century owing to hunting and habitat fragmentation. Little is known, however, about its origin, evolutionary history and population dynamics during the Pleistocene. RESULTS: Through ancient DNA analysis we show that the emblematic European bison has experienced several waves of population expansion, contraction, and extinction during the last 50,000 years in Europe, culminating in a major reduction of genetic diversity during the Holocene...
October 21, 2016: BMC Biology
Kyung-Ha Lee, Peipei Zhang, Hong Joo Kim, Diana M Mitrea, Mohona Sarkar, Brian D Freibaum, Jaclyn Cika, Maura Coughlin, James Messing, Amandine Molliex, Brian A Maxwell, Nam Chul Kim, Jamshid Temirov, Jennifer Moore, Regina-Maria Kolaitis, Timothy I Shaw, Bing Bai, Junmin Peng, Richard W Kriwacki, J Paul Taylor
Expansion of a hexanucleotide repeat GGGGCC (G4C2) in C9ORF72 is the most common cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Transcripts carrying (G4C2) expansions undergo unconventional, non-ATG-dependent translation, generating toxic dipeptide repeat (DPR) proteins thought to contribute to disease. Here, we identify the interactome of all DPRs and find that arginine-containing DPRs, polyGly-Arg (GR) and polyPro-Arg (PR), interact with RNA-binding proteins and proteins with low complexity sequence domains (LCDs) that often mediate the assembly of membrane-less organelles...
October 20, 2016: Cell
Christopher P Webster, Emma F Smith, Andrew J Grierson, Kurt J De Vos
A GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat expansion in the first intron of the C9orf72 gene is the most common genetic defect associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) (C9ALS/FTD). Haploinsufficiency and a resulting loss of C9orf72 protein function has been suggested as a possible pathogenic mechanism in C9ALS/FTD. C9ALS/FTD patients exhibit specific ubiquitin and p62/sequestosome-1 positive but TDP-43 negative inclusions in the cerebellum and hippocampus, indicating possible autophagy deficits in these patients...
October 21, 2016: Small GTPases
Tao Peng, Howard C Hang
Over the past years, fluorescent proteins (e.g., green fluorescent proteins) have been widely utilized to visualize recombinant protein expression and localization in live cells. Although powerful, fluorescent protein tags are limited by their relatively large sizes and potential perturbation to protein function. Alternatively, site-specific labeling of proteins with small-molecule organic fluorophores using bioorthogonal chemistry may provide a more precise and less perturbing method. This approach involves site-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids (UAAs) into proteins via genetic code expansion, followed by bioorthogonal chemical labeling with small organic fluorophores in living cells...
October 21, 2016: Journal of the American Chemical Society
Janet Ayello, Jessica Hochberg, Allyson Flower, Yaya Chu, Laxmi V Baxi, William Quish, Carmella van de Ven, Mitchell S Cairo
NK cells play a significant role in reducing relapse in patients with hematological malignancies following allogeneic stem cell transplantation but NK cell number and naturally occurring inhibitory signals limit their capability. IL-15 and 4-1BBL are important modulators of NK expansion and functional activation. With an aim to overcome these limitations, cord blood (CB) mononuclear cells (MNC) were ex-vivo expanded (EvE) for 7 days with genetically modified K562-mbIL15-41BBL (MODK562) or wildtype K562 (WTK562)...
October 17, 2016: Experimental Hematology
Sandro M Krieg, Raimund Trabold, Nikolaus Plesnila
Arginine-vasopressin (AVP) V1 receptors are known to mediate brain edema formation after traumatic brain injury (TBI). So far, however, AVP V1 receptors were only inhibited by genetic deletion or prior to trauma. Therefore the current study aimed to determine the therapeutic window of AVP V1 receptors anatomization after TBI. Male C57BL/6 mice (n=7 per group) were subjected to controlled cortical impact (CCI) and 500 ng of a selective peptide V1 receptor antagonist (V1880) were applied by intracerebroventricular injection 5 min, 1, 3, and 6 hours thereafter...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Neurotrauma
Sarah G Whaley, P David Rogers
Candida infections have increased due to the growth and expansion of susceptible patient populations. The azole fluconazole is the most widely prescribed antifungal, but rising rates of clinical resistance among Candida glabrata isolates have greatly limited its utility. A better understanding of the mechanisms of azole antifungal resistance will provide information needed to overcome this clinical problem and reclaim this antifungal class as an option for empiric treatment of Candida infections. By far, the most frequent mechanism of azole resistance in C...
December 2016: Current Infectious Disease Reports
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"