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genetic expansion

Olivier Turc, François Tardieu
Abortion of reproductive organs is a major limiting factor of yield under water deficit, but is also a trait selected for by evolutionary processes. Youngest reproductive organs must be prone to abortion so older organs can finish their development in case of limited resources. Water deficit increases natural abortion via two developmentally-driven processes, namely a signal from the first fertilized ovaries and a simultaneous arrest of the expansive growth of all ovaries at a precise stage. In maize (Zea mays) subjected to water deficits typically encountered in dryland agriculture, these developmental mechanisms account for 90 % of drought-associated abortion and are irreversible three days after silk emergence...
March 13, 2018: Journal of Experimental Botany
Zhaodong Li, Ludovica F Buttó, Kristine-Anne Buela, Li-Guo Jia, Minh Lam, John D Ward, Theresa T Pizarro, Fabio Cominelli
Death receptor 3 (DR3), a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily, has been implicated in regulating T-helper type-1 (TH 1), type-2 (TH 2), and type-17 (TH 17) responses as well as regulatory T cell (Treg ) and innate lymphoid cell (ILC) functions during immune-mediated diseases. However, the role of DR3 in controlling lymphocyte functions in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is not fully understood. Recent studies have shown that activation of DR3 signaling modulates Treg expansion suggesting that stimulation of DR3 represents a potential therapeutic target in human inflammatory diseases, including Crohn's disease (CD)...
2018: Frontiers in Immunology
Kurt A Zimmerman, Cheng Jack Song, Nancy Gonzalez-Mize, Zhang Li, Bradley K Yoder
Hepatorenal fibrocystic disease (HRFCD) is characterized by cysts in the kidney and liver with associated fibrosis and is the result of defects in proteins required for cilia function or assembly. Previous reports indicate that macrophages, mainly M2-like macrophages, contribute to HRFCD, although the origin (yolk-sac derived resident macrophages vs bone-marrow derived infiltrating macrophages) and contribution of these cells to the observed phenotypes is unknown. Herein, we utilize a congenital model of cilia dysfunction (IFT88Orpk ) to study the importance of macrophages in HRFCD...
March 15, 2018: American Journal of Physiology. Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology
Lucía Fernández, Alejandra Leivas, Jaime Valentín, Adela Escudero, Dolores Corral, Raquel de Paz, Maria Vela, David Bueno, Rebeca Rodríguez, Juan Manuel Torres, Mariana Díaz-Almirón, Eduardo López-Collazo, Joaquin Martinez-Lopez, Antonio Pérez-Martínez
BACKGROUND: Cancer immunotherapy involving natural killer (NK) cells has gained interest. Here we report two methods to obtain interleukin (IL)-15-activated NK cells for clinical use. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: IL-15-activated NK cell products were obtained after 1) enrichment from healthy haploidentical donors' peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) collected by nonmobilized apheresis by a two-step magnetic procedure, depletion of CD3+ cells followed by selection of CD56+ cells and ex vivo overnight stimulation with IL-15 (NKIL15); and 2) expansion using the K562-mb15-41BBL cell line (NKAE), from autologous PBMNCs from patients with multiple myeloma or expansion from healthy haploidentical PBMNCs obtained from whole blood using the same previous cell line...
March 14, 2018: Transfusion
Shantisree Sandeepani Rayagiri, Daniele Ranaldi, Alexander Raven, Nur Izzah Farhana Mohamad Azhar, Olivier Lefebvre, Peter S Zammit, Anne-Gaëlle Borycki
A central question in stem cell biology is the relationship between stem cells and their niche. Although previous reports have uncovered how signaling molecules released by niche cells support stem cell function, the role of the extra-cellular matrix (ECM) within the niche is unclear. Here, we show that upon activation, skeletal muscle stem cells (satellite cells) induce local remodeling of the ECM and the deposition of laminin-α1 and laminin-α5 into the basal lamina of the satellite cell niche. Genetic ablation of laminin-α1, disruption of integrin-α6 signaling or blocking matrix metalloproteinase activity impairs satellite cell expansion and self-renewal...
March 14, 2018: Nature Communications
Mathew A Cherian, Sydney Olson, Hemalatha Sundaramoorthi, Kitra Cates, Xiaogang Cheng, John Harding, Andrew Martens, Grant A Challen, Manoj Tyagi, Lee Ratner, Daniel Rauch
The human T cell leukemia virus-1 (HTLV-1) oncoprotein Tax drives cell proliferation and resistance to apoptosis early in the pathogenesis of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). Subsequently, likely as a result of specific immuno-editing, Tax expression is downregulated and functionally replaced by somatic driver mutations of the host genome. Both amplification and point mutations of interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) have been previously detected in ATL, and the K59R mutation is the most common single-nucleotide variation in IRF4 and is found exclusively in ATL...
March 14, 2018: Journal of Biological Chemistry
Laxman Khanal, Mukesh K Chalise, Kai He, Bipin K Acharya, Yoshi Kawamoto, Xuelong Jiang
Genetic diversity of a species is influenced by multiple factors, including the Quaternary glacial-interglacial cycles and geophysical barriers. Such factors are not yet well documented for fauna from the southern border of the Himalayan region. This study used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences and ecological niche modeling (ENM) to explore how the late Pleistocene climatic fluctuations and complex geography of the Himalayan region have shaped genetic diversity, population genetic structure, and demographic history of the Nepalese population of Assam macaques (Macaca assamensis) in the Himalayan foothills...
March 14, 2018: American Journal of Primatology
Josef Davidsson, Andreas Puschmann, Ulf Tedgård, David Bryder, Lars Nilsson, Jörg Cammenga
Germline mutations in the SAMD9 and SAMD9L genes, located in tandem on chromosome 7, are associated with a clinical spectrum of disorders including the MIRAGE syndrome, ataxia-pancytopenia syndrome and myelodysplasia and leukemia syndrome with monosomy 7 syndrome. Germline gain-of-function mutations increase SAMD9 or SAMD9L's normal antiproliferative effect. This causes pancytopenia and generally restricted growth and/or specific organ hypoplasia in non-hematopoietic tissues. In blood cells, additional somatic aberrations that reverse the germline mutation's effect, and give rise to the clonal expansion of cells with reduced or no antiproliferative effect of SAMD9 or SAMD9L include complete or partial chromosome 7 loss or loss-of-function mutations in SAMD9 or SAMD9L...
February 25, 2018: Leukemia: Official Journal of the Leukemia Society of America, Leukemia Research Fund, U.K
Moon Jong Kim, Bo Xia, Han Na Suh, Sung Ho Lee, Sohee Jun, Esther M Lien, Jie Zhang, Kaifu Chen, Jae-Il Park
The underlying mechanisms of how self-renewing cells are controlled in regenerating tissues and cancer remain ambiguous. PCNA-associated factor (PAF) modulates DNA repair via PCNA. Also, PAF hyperactivates Wnt/β-catenin signaling independently of PCNA interaction. We found that PAF is expressed in intestinal stem and progenitor cells (ISCs and IPCs) and markedly upregulated during intestinal regeneration and tumorigenesis. Whereas PAF is dispensable for intestinal homeostasis, upon radiation injury, genetic ablation of PAF impairs intestinal regeneration along with the severe loss of ISCs and Myc expression...
March 12, 2018: Developmental Cell
Kelly Louise Bennett, Martha Kaddumukasa, Fortunate Shija, Rousseau Djouaka, Gerald Misinzo, Julius Lutwama, Yvonne Marie Linton, Catherine Walton
The study of demographic processes involved in species diversification and evolution ultimately provides explanations for the complex distribution of biodiversity on earth, indicates regions important for the maintenance and generation of biodiversity, and identifies biological units important for conservation or medical consequence. African and forest biota have both received relatively little attention with regard to understanding their diversification, although one possible mechanism is that this has been driven by historical climate change...
March 2018: Ecology and Evolution
Remco R Bouckaert, Claire Bowern, Quentin D Atkinson
It remains a mystery how Pama-Nyungan, the world's largest hunter-gatherer language family, came to dominate the Australian continent. Some argue that social or technological advantages allowed rapid language replacement from the Gulf Plains region during the mid-Holocene. Others have proposed expansions from refugia linked to climatic changes after the last ice age or, more controversially, during the initial colonization of Australia. Here, we combine basic vocabulary data from 306 Pama-Nyungan languages with Bayesian phylogeographic methods to explicitly model the expansion of the family across Australia and test between these origin scenarios...
March 12, 2018: Nature Ecology & Evolution
Marie Lopez, Athanasios Kousathanas, Hélène Quach, Christine Harmant, Patrick Mouguiama-Daouda, Jean-Marie Hombert, Alain Froment, George H Perry, Luis B Barreiro, Paul Verdu, Etienne Patin, Lluís Quintana-Murci
Understanding how deleterious genetic variation is distributed across human populations is of key importance in evolutionary biology and medical genetics. However, the impact of population size changes and gene flow on the corresponding mutational load remains a controversial topic. Here, we report high-coverage exomes from 300 rainforest hunter-gatherers and farmers of central Africa, whose distinct subsistence strategies are expected to have impacted their demographic pasts. Detailed demographic inference indicates that hunter-gatherers and farmers recently experienced population collapses and expansions, respectively, accompanied by increased gene flow...
March 12, 2018: Nature Ecology & Evolution
Cristina Valdiosera, Torsten Günther, Juan Carlos Vera-Rodríguez, Irene Ureña, Eneko Iriarte, Ricardo Rodríguez-Varela, Luciana G Simões, Rafael M Martínez-Sánchez, Emma M Svensson, Helena Malmström, Laura Rodríguez, José-María Bermúdez de Castro, Eudald Carbonell, Alfonso Alday, José Antonio Hernández Vera, Anders Götherström, José-Miguel Carretero, Juan Luis Arsuaga, Colin I Smith, Mattias Jakobsson
Population genomic studies of ancient human remains have shown how modern-day European population structure has been shaped by a number of prehistoric migrations. The Neolithization of Europe has been associated with large-scale migrations from Anatolia, which was followed by migrations of herders from the Pontic steppe at the onset of the Bronze Age. Southwestern Europe was one of the last parts of the continent reached by these migrations, and modern-day populations from this region show intriguing similarities to the initial Neolithic migrants...
March 12, 2018: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Maarten van Zonneveld, Nerea Larranaga, Benjamin Blonder, Lidio Coradin, José I Hormaza, Danny Hunter
Neotropical fruit species once dispersed by Pleistocene megafauna have regained relevance in diversifying human diets to address malnutrition. Little is known about the historic interactions between humans and these fruit species. We quantified the human role in modifying geographic and environmental ranges of Neotropical fruit species by comparing the distribution of megafauna-dispersed fruit species that have been part of both human and megafauna diets with fruit species that were exclusively part of megafauna diets...
March 12, 2018: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Behzad Yaghmaeian Salmani, Ignacio Monedero Cobeta, Jonathan Rakar, Susanne Bauer, Jesús Rodriguez Curt, Annika Starkenberg, Stefan Thor
A conserved feature of the central nervous system (CNS) is the prominent expansion of anterior regions (brain) when compared to posterior (nerve cord). The cellular and regulatory processes driving anterior CNS expansion are not well understood in any bilaterian species. Here, we address this expansion in Drosophila and mouse. We find that when compared to the nerve cord the brain, in both Drosophila and mouse, displays extended progenitor proliferation, more elaborate daughter cell proliferation and more rapid cell cycle speed...
March 12, 2018: Development
Loren Leclezio, Sugnet Gardner-Lubbe, Petrus J de Vries
BACKGROUND: Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a genetic disorder with multisystem involvement. The lifetime prevalence of TSC-Associated Neuropsychiatric Disorders (TAND) is in the region of 90% in an apparently unique, individual pattern. This "uniqueness" poses significant challenges for diagnosis, psycho-education, and intervention planning. To date, no studies have explored whether there may be natural clusters of TAND. The purpose of this feasibility study was (1) to investigate the practicability of identifying natural TAND clusters, and (2) to identify appropriate multivariate data analysis techniques for larger-scale studies...
January 31, 2018: Pediatric Neurology
Noori Chai, Aaron D Gitler
A hexanucleotide repeat expansion in the C9orf72 gene has been identified as the most common cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. The expanded hexanucleotide repeat is translated by an unconventional mechanism to produce five species of dipeptide repeat proteins (DPRs), glycine-proline (GP), glycine-alanine, glycine-arginine (GR), proline-alanine (PA), and proline-arginine (PR). Of these, the arginine-rich ones, PR and GR, are highly toxic in a variety of model systems, ranging from human cells, to Drosophila, to even the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae...
March 8, 2018: FEMS Yeast Research
Amrutha Swaminathan, Marilou Bouffard, Meijiang Liao, Sarah Ryan, Janis Bennion Callister, Stuart M Pickering-Brown, Gary Alan Barclay Armstrong, Pierre Drapeau
Large expansions of hexanucleotide GGGGCC (G4C2) repeats (hundreds to thousands) in the first intron of the chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72) locus are the strongest known genetic factor associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (ALS/FTLD). Different hypotheses exist about the underlying disease mechanism including loss-of-function by haploinsufficiency, toxicity arising as a result of RNA or dipeptide repeats (DPRs). Five different DPRs are produced by repeat-associated non-ATG-initiated (RAN) translation of the G4C2 repeats...
March 8, 2018: Human Molecular Genetics
'Ale'alani Dudoit, Matthew Iacchei, Richard R Coleman, Michelle R Gaither, William E Browne, Brian W Bowen, Robert J Toonen
The banded coral shrimp, Stenopus hispidus (Crustacea: Decapoda: Stenopodidea) is a popular marine ornamental species with a circumtropical distribution. The planktonic larval stage lasts ∼120-253 days, indicating considerable dispersal potential, but few studies have investigated genetic connectivity on a global scale in marine invertebrates. To resolve patterns of divergence and phylogeography of S. hispidus , we surveyed 525 bp of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) from 198 individuals sampled at 10 locations across ∼27,000 km of the species range...
2018: PeerJ
Wendy S Slutske
Social changes, such as the expansion of legal forms of gambling, can influence not only the prevalence of gambling, but can also shape the relative importance of genetic and environmental contributions to individual differences in the propensity to gamble. In the present study, I examined differences in the prevalence and in the relative contribution of genetic and environmental factors to gambling involvement in the United States in 1962 versus 2002. The data came from two sources: (1) a survey of 839 17-year-old same-sex twin pairs from the National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test twin study, and (2) an interview of 477 18- to 26-year-old same-sex twin pairs from Wave III of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health...
March 12, 2018: Twin Research and Human Genetics: the Official Journal of the International Society for Twin Studies
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