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primary motor cortex

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28427299/effects-of-low-frequency-repetitive-transcranial-magnetic-stimulation-on-upper-extremity-motor-recovery-and-functional-outcomes-in-chronic-stroke-patients-a-randomized-controlled-trial
#1
Ayhan Aşkın, Aliye Tosun, Ümit Seçil Demirdal
BACKGROUND: Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) was suggested as a preconditioning method that would increase brain plasticity and that it would be optimal to combine rTMS with intensive rehabilitation. OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy of inhibitory rTMS on upper extremity motor recovery and functional outcomes in chronic ischemic stroke patients. METHODS: In this randomized controlled trial, experimental group received low-frequency (LF) rTMS to the primary motor cortex of the unaffected side + physical therapy (PT), and control group received PT...
April 20, 2017: Somatosensory & Motor Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28425061/gray-matter-and-white-matter-changes-in-non-demented-amyotrophic-lateral-sclerosis-patients-with-or-without-cognitive-impairment-a-combined-voxel-based-morphometry-and-tract-based-spatial-statistics-whole-brain-analysis
#2
Foteini Christidi, Efstratios Karavasilis, Franz Riederer, Ioannis Zalonis, Panagiotis Ferentinos, Georgios Velonakis, Sophia Xirou, Michalis Rentzos, Georgios Argiropoulos, Vasiliki Zouvelou, Thomas Zambelis, Athanasios Athanasakos, Panagiotis Toulas, Konstantinos Vadikolias, Efstathios Efstathopoulos, Spyros Kollias, Nikolaos Karandreas, Nikolaos Kelekis, Ioannis Evdokimidis
The phenotypic heterogeneity in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) implies that patients show structural changes within but also beyond the motor cortex and corticospinal tract and furthermore outside the frontal lobes, even if frank dementia is not detected. The aim of the present study was to investigate both gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) changes in non-demented amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients with or without cognitive impairment (ALS-motor and ALS-plus, respectively). Nineteen ALS-motor, 31 ALS-plus and 25 healthy controls (HC) underwent 3D-T1-weighted and 30-directional diffusion-weighted imaging on a 3 T MRI scanner...
April 19, 2017: Brain Imaging and Behavior
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28425060/positron-emission-tomography-assessment-of-cerebral-glucose-metabolic-rates-in-autism-spectrum-disorder-and-schizophrenia
#3
Serge A Mitelman, Marie-Cecile Bralet, M Mehmet Haznedar, Eric Hollander, Lina Shihabuddin, Erin A Hazlett, Monte S Buchsbaum
Several models have been proposed to account for observed overlaps in clinical features and genetic predisposition between schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorder. This study assessed similarities and differences in topological patterns and vectors of glucose metabolism in both disorders in reference to these models. Co-registered (18)fluorodeoxyglucose PET and MRI scans were obtained in 41 schizophrenia, 25 ASD, and 55 healthy control subjects. AFNI was used to map cortical and subcortical regions of interest...
April 19, 2017: Brain Imaging and Behavior
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28424387/-cortical-areas-for-controlling-voluntary-movements
#4
Yoshihisa Nakayama, Eiji Hoshi
The primary motor cortex is located in Brodmann area 4 at the most posterior part of the frontal lobe. The primary motor cortex corresponds to an output stage of motor signals, sending motor commands to the brain stem and spinal cord. Brodmann area 6 is rostral to Brodmann area 4, where multiple higher-order motor areas are located. The premotor area, which is located in the lateral part, is involved in planning and executing action based on sensory signals. The premotor area contributes to the reaching for and grasping of an object to achieve a behavioral goal...
April 2017: Brain and Nerve, Shinkei Kenkyū No Shinpo
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28424294/gaba-and-primary-motor-cortex-inhibition-in-young-and-older-adults-a-multimodal-reliability-study
#5
Ronan A Mooney, John Cirillo, Winston D Byblow
The effects of healthy ageing on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) within primary motor cortex (M1) remain poorly understood. Studies have reported contrasting results, potentially due to limitations with the common assessment technique. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of healthy ageing on M1 GABA concentration and neurotransmission using a multimodal approach. Fifteen young and 16 older adults participated in this study. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used to measure M1 GABA concentration...
April 19, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28420975/beta-band-corticomuscular-drive-reflects-muscle-coordination-strategies
#6
Alexander Reyes, Christopher M Laine, Jason J Kutch, Francisco J Valero-Cuevas
During force production, hand muscle activity is known to be coherent with activity in primary motor cortex, specifically in the beta-band (15-30 Hz) frequency range. It is not clear, however, if this coherence reflects the control strategy selected by the nervous system for a given task, or if it instead reflects an intrinsic property of cortico-spinal communication. Here, we measured corticomuscular and intermuscular coherence between muscles of index finger and thumb while a two-finger pinch grip of identical net force was applied to objects which were either stable (allowing synergistic activation of finger muscles) or unstable (requiring individuated finger control)...
2017: Frontiers in Computational Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28420971/dynamic-increase-in-corticomuscular-coherence-during-bilateral-cyclical-ankle-movements
#7
Takashi Yoshida, Kei Masani, Karl Zabjek, Robert Chen, Milos R Popovic
In humans, the midline primary motor cortex is active during walking. However, the exact role of such cortical participation is unknown. To delineate the role of the primary motor cortex in walking, we examined whether the primary motor cortex would activate leg muscles during movements that retained specific requirements of walking (i.e., locomotive actions). We recorded electroencephalographic and electromyographic signals from 15 healthy, young men while they sat and performed bilateral, cyclical ankle movements...
2017: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28420970/single-session-anodal-tdcs-with-small-size-stimulating-electrodes-over-frontoparietal-superficial-sites-does-not-affect-motor-sequence-learning
#8
Fahimeh Hashemirad, Paul B Fitzgerald, Maryam Zoghi, Shapour Jaberzadeh
Due to the potential of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (a-tDCS) for enhancement of fine sequenced movements and increasing interest in achieving high level of fine movements in the trained and untrained hands especially at initial stage of learning, we designed this study to investigate whether the application of single-session a-tDCS with small-size stimulating electrodes over FPN sites, such as dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), primary motor cortex (M1) or posterior parietal cortex (PPC) could enhance sequence learning with the trained hand and these effects are transferred into the untrained hand or not...
2017: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28420959/transcranial-direct-current-stimulation-does-not-affect-lower-extremity-muscle-strength-training-in-healthy-individuals-a-triple-blind-sham-controlled-study
#9
Kazuhei Maeda, Tomofumi Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi Tatemoto, Kunitsugu Kondo, Yohei Otaka, Satoshi Tanaka
The present study investigated the effects of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on lower extremity muscle strength training in 24 healthy participants. In this triple-blind, sham-controlled study, participants were randomly allocated to the anodal tDCS plus muscle strength training (anodal tDCS) group or sham tDCS plus muscle strength training (sham tDCS) group. Anodal tDCS (2 mA) was applied to the primary motor cortex of the lower extremity during muscle strength training of the knee extensors and flexors...
2017: Frontiers in Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28420581/response-variability-of-different-anodal-transcranial-direct-current-stimulation-intensities-across-multiple-sessions
#10
Claudia Ammann, Martin A Lindquist, Pablo A Celnik
BACKGROUND: It is well known that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is capable of modulating corticomotor excitability. However, a source of growing concern has been the observed inter- and intra-individual variability of tDCS-responses. Recent studies have assessed whether individuals respond in a predictable manner across repeated sessions of anodal tDCS (atDCS). The findings of these investigations have been inconsistent, and their methods have some limitations (i.e. lack of sham condition or testing only one tDCS intensity)...
April 10, 2017: Brain Stimulation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28417848/dynamic-range-adaptation-in-primary-motor-cortical-populations
#11
Robert G Rasmussen, Andrew Schwartz, Steven M Chase
Neural populations from various sensory regions demonstrate dynamic range adaptation in response to changes in the statistical distribution of their input stimuli. These adaptations help optimize the transmission of information about sensory inputs. Here, we show a similar effect in the firing rates of primary motor cortical cells. We trained monkeys to operate a brain-computer interface in both two- and three-dimensional virtual environments. We found that neurons in primary motor cortex exhibited a change in the amplitude of their directional tuning curves between the two tasks...
April 18, 2017: ELife
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28416595/nonsinusoidal-beta-oscillations-reflect-cortical-pathophysiology-in-parkinson-s-disease
#12
Scott R Cole, Roemer van der Meij, Erik J Peterson, Coralie de Hemptinne, Philip A Starr, Bradley Voytek
Oscillations in neural activity play a critical role in neural computation and communication. There is intriguing new evidence that the nonsinusoidal features of the oscillatory waveforms may inform underlying physiological and pathophysiological characteristics. Time-domain waveform analysis approaches stand in contrast to traditional Fourier-based methods, which alter or destroy subtle waveform features. Recently it has been shown that the waveform features of oscillatory beta (13-30 Hz) events-a prominent motor cortical oscillation-may reflect near-synchronous excitatory synaptic inputs onto cortical pyramidal neurons...
April 17, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28416451/diffeomorphic-functional-brain-surface-alignment-functional-demons
#13
Karl-Heinz Nenning, Hesheng Liu, Satrajit Ghosh, Mert Sabuncu, Ernst Schwartz, Georg Langs
Aligning brain structures across individuals is a central prerequisite for comparative neuroimaging studies. Typically, registration approaches assume a strong association between the features used for alignment, such as macro-anatomy, and the variable observed, such as functional activation or connectivity. Here, we propose to use the structure of intrinsic resting state fMRI signal correlation patterns as a basis for alignment of the cortex in functional studies. Rather than assuming the spatial correspondence of functional structures between subjects, we have identified locations with similar connectivity profiles across subjects...
April 14, 2017: NeuroImage
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28411148/behavioural-characterization-of-ankyring-deficient-mice-a-model-for-ank3-related-disorders
#14
I M van der Werf, D Van Dam, S Missault, B Yalcin, P P De Deyn, G Vandeweyer, R F Kooy
ANK3 encodes AnkyrinG (AnkG), a member of the Ankyrin family that is expressed in several different isoforms in many tissues. A unique serine-rich domain and tail domain in the two largest isoforms of AnkG (270 and 480kDa), restrict AnkG to the axon initial segment and nodes of Ranvier of myelinated neurons. At these sites, AnkG is a master regulator, coordinating the strict clustering of components necessary for proper action potential initiation and propagation along the axon. These components include voltage-gated sodium channels, potassium channels and members of the L1 cell adhesion molecule family...
April 11, 2017: Behavioural Brain Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28409354/retrosplenial-cortical-thinning-as-a-possible-major-contributor-for-cognitive-impairment-in-hiv-patients
#15
Na-Young Shin, Jinwoo Hong, Jun Yong Choi, Seung-Koo Lee, Soo Mee Lim, Uicheul Yoon
OBJECTIVES: To identify brain cortical regions relevant to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) in HIV patients. METHODS: HIV patients with HAND (n = 10), those with intact cognition (HIV-IC; n = 12), and age-matched, seronegative controls (n = 11) were recruited. All participants were male and underwent 3-dimensional T1-weighted imaging. Both vertex-wise and region of interest (ROI) analyses were performed to analyse cortical thickness. RESULTS: Compared to controls, both HIV-IC and HAND showed decreased cortical thickness mainly in the bilateral primary sensorimotor areas, extending to the prefrontal and parietal cortices...
April 13, 2017: European Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28408865/tau-pathology-distribution-in-alzheimer-s-disease-corresponds-differentially-to-cognition-relevant-functional-brain-networks
#16
Oskar Hansson, Michel J Grothe, Tor Olof Strandberg, Tomas Ohlsson, Douglas Hägerström, Jonas Jögi, Ruben Smith, Michael Schöll
Neuropathological studies have shown that the typical neurofibrillary pathology of hyperphosphorylated tau protein in Alzheimer's disease (AD) preferentially affects specific brain regions whereas others remain relatively spared. It has been suggested that the distinct regional distribution profile of tau pathology in AD may be a consequence of the intrinsic network structure of the human brain. The spatially distributed brain regions that are most affected by the spread of tau pathology may hence reflect an interconnected neuronal system...
2017: Frontiers in Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28404826/multi-sensory-coding-in-the-multiple-demand-regions-vibrotactile-task-information-is-coded-in-frontoparietal-cortex
#17
Alexandra Woolgar, Regine Zopf
At any given moment, our brains receive input from multiple senses. Successful behaviour depends on our ability to prioritise the most important information and ignore the rest. A multiple-demand (MD) network of frontal and parietal regions is thought to support this process by adjusting to code information that is currently relevant (Duncan 2010). Accordingly, the network is proposed to encode a range of different types of information, including perceptual stimuli, task rules, and responses, as needed for the current cognitive operation...
April 12, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28402561/the-role-of-the-default-mode-network-in-component-processes-underlying-the-wandering-mind
#18
Giulia L Poerio, Mladen Sormaz, Hao-Ting Wang, Daniel Margulies, Elizabeth Jefferies, Jonathan Smallwood
Experiences such as mind-wandering illustrate that cognition is not always tethered to events in the here-and-now. Although converging evidence emphasises the default mode network (DMN) in mind-wandering, its precise contribution remains unclear. The DMN comprises cortical regions that are maximally distant from primary sensory and motor cortex, a topological location that may support the stimulus-independence of mind-wandering. The DMN is functionally heterogeneous, comprising regions engaged by memory, social cognition, and planning; processes relevant to mind-wandering content...
March 21, 2017: Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28401788/type-2-diabetes-mellitus-reduces-cortical-thickness-and-decreases-oxidative-metabolism-in-sensorimotor-regions-after-stroke
#19
Jennifer K Ferris, Sue Peters, Katlyn E Brown, Katherine Tourigny, Lara A Boyd
Individuals with type-2 diabetes mellitus experience poor motor outcomes after ischemic stroke. Recent research suggests that type-2 diabetes adversely impacts neuronal integrity and function, yet little work has considered how these neuronal changes affect sensorimotor outcomes after stroke. Here, we considered how type-2 diabetes impacted the structural and metabolic function of the sensorimotor cortex after stroke using volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS)...
January 1, 2017: Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28400816/the-cortical-activation-pattern-during-bilateral-arm-raising-movements
#20
Sung Ho Jang, Jung Pyo Seo, Seung-Hyun Lee, Sang-Hyun Jin, Sang Seok Yeo
Bilateral arm raising movements have been used in brain rehabilitation for a long time. However, no study has been reported on the effect of these movements on the cerebral cortex. In this study, using functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), we attempted to investigate cortical activation generated during bilateral arm raising movements. Ten normal subjects were recruited for this study. fNIRS was performed using an fNIRS system with 49 channels. Bilateral arm raising movements were performed in sitting position at the rate of 0...
February 2017: Neural Regeneration Research
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