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Exertional heat stroke

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29901435/sex-dependent-responses-to-exertional-heat-stroke-in-mice
#1
Christian K Garcia, Alex J Mattingly, Gerard P Robinson, Orlando Laitano, Michelle A King, Shauna M Dineen, Lisa R Leon, Thomas L Clanton
With increasing participation of females in endurance athletics and active military service, it is important to determine if there are inherent sex-dependent susceptibilities to exertional heat injury or heat stroke. In this study we compared responses of male and female adult mice to exertional heat stroke (EHS). All mice were instrumented for telemetry core temperature measurement and were exercise-trained for 3 weeks prior to EHS. During EHS, environmental temperature was 37.5{degree sign}C (35% RH) while the mice ran on a forced running wheel, using incremental increases in speed...
June 14, 2018: Journal of Applied Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29809089/does-gender-affect-rectal-temperature-cooling-rates-a-critically-appraised-topic
#2
Kayla E Boehm, Kevin C Miller
Clinical Scenario: Exertional heat stroke (EHS) is a medical emergency characterized by body core temperatures >40.5°C and central nervous system dysfunction.1 An EHS diagnosis should be immediately followed by cold-water immersion (CWI). Ideally, EHS victims cool at a rate >0.15°C/min until temperature reaches 38.9°C.1 While generally accepted, these EHS treatment recommendations often stem from research which only examined males. Since gender differences exist in anthropomorphics (e.g., body surface area, lean body mass)2 and anthropomorophics impact CWI cooling rates,3 it is possible CWI cooling rates may differ between genders...
May 29, 2018: Journal of Sport Rehabilitation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29790832/without-warning-worker-deaths-from-heat-2014-2016
#3
Cora Roelofs
Worker deaths from heat exposure are unlike heat deaths in the general population; workers tend to be outside in variable temperatures and younger than sixty-five years. Climate change will increase the frequency, duration, and variability of hot temperatures. Public health warning systems, such as the Heat Index of the National Weather Service, do not generally account for workers' greater likelihood of exposure to direct sunlight or exertion. Only 28% of the 79 worker heat-related fatalities during 2014-2016 occurred on days when the National Weather Service warning would have included the possibility of fatal heat stroke...
January 1, 2018: New Solutions: a Journal of Environmental and Occupational Health Policy: NS
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29775421/probability-of-heat-intolerance-standardized-interpretation-of-heat-tolerance-testing-results-versus-specialist-judgment
#4
Haggai Schermann, Erin Craig, Einat Yanovich, Itay Ketko, Gary Kalmanovich, Ran Yanovich
CONTEXT:   The heat-tolerance test (HTT) is a screening tool for secondary prevention of exertional heat illness by the Israel Defense Forces. To discern participant tolerance, recruits are exposed to intermediate environmental and exercise stresses, and their physiological responses, core temperature, and heart rate are monitored. When their physiological measures rise at a higher rate or exceed the upper levels of absolute values compared with other participants, heat intolerance (HI) is diagnosed...
April 2018: Journal of Athletic Training
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29738320/case-series-of-exertional-heat-stroke-in-runners-during-early-spring-2014-to-2016-cincinnati-flying-pig-marathon
#5
Jon G Divine, Matthew W Daggy, Emily E Dixon, Dustin P LeBlanc, Richard A Okragly, Kimberly A Hasselfeld
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2018: Current Sports Medicine Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29664001/-protective-effect-of-mild-hypothermia-at-different-starting-times-on-organ-function-in-patient-with-exertional-heat-stroke
#6
Qinghua Li, Rongqing Sun, Hongdi Lyu, Dexin Shen, Qing Hu, Haiwei Wang, Nannan Wang, Jin Yan, Jing Wang
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the protective effect of mild hypothermia at different starting times on the physiological functions of the viscera of exertional heat stroke (EHS). METHODS: A prospective randomized controlled trial was conducted. EHS patients admitted to intensive care unit of the 159th Hospital of People's Liberation Army and the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University from June 2015 to June 2017 were enrolled. The patients were divided into 2, 4, 6 hours start hypothermia treatment groups according to the random number table method, the mild hypothermia was initiated at 2, 4 and 6 hours after the disease onset respectively, and the methods were the same in each group...
April 2018: Zhonghua Wei Zhong Bing Ji Jiu Yi Xue
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29594509/exertional-heat-illness-incidence-and-on-site-medical-team-preparedness-in-warm-weather
#7
Yuri Hosokawa, William M Adams, Luke N Belval, Robert J Davis, Robert A Huggins, John F Jardine, Rachel K Katch, Rebecca L Stearns, Douglas J Casa
To investigate the influence of estimated wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) and the International Institute of Race Medicine (IIRM) activity modification guidelines on the incidence of exertional heat stroke (EHS) and heat exhaustion (HEx) and the ability of an on-site medical team to treat those afflicted. Medical records of EHS and HEx patients over a 17-year period from the New Balance Falmouth Road Race were examined. Climatologic data from nearby weather stations were obtained to calculate WBGT with the Australian Bureau of Meteorology (WBGTA ) and Liljegren (WBGTL ) models...
March 29, 2018: International Journal of Biometeorology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29577887/disinhibiting-neurons-in-the-dorsomedial-hypothalamus-delays-the-onset-of-exertional-fatigue-and-exhaustion-in-rats-exercising-in-a-warm-environment
#8
Dmitry V Zaretsky, Hannah Kline, Maria V Zaretskaia, Mary Beth Brown, Pamela J Durant, Nathan J Alves, Daniel E Rusyniak
Stimulants cause hyperthermia, in part, by increasing heat generation through exercise. Stimulants also delay the onset of fatigue and exhaustion allowing animals to exercise longer. If used in a warm environment, this combination (increased exercise and decreased fatigue) can cause heat stroke. The dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) is involved in mediating locomotion from stimulants. Furthermore, inhibiting the DMH decreases locomotion and prevents hyperthermia in rats given stimulants in a warm environment. Whether the DMH is involved in mediating exercise-induced fatigue and exhaustion is not known...
June 15, 2018: Brain Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29472229/management-of-exertional-heat-stroke-a-practical-update-for-primary-care-physicians
#9
Edward Walter, Kiki Steel
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2018: British Journal of General Practice: the Journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29466080/does-pre-cooling-with-whole-body-immersion-affect-thermal-sensation-or-perceived-exertion-a-critically-appraised-topic
#10
Timothy M Wohlfert, Kevin C Miller
Clinical Scenario: Exertional heat stroke (EHS) is a potentially deadly heat illness and poses a significant health risk to athletes; EHS survival rates are near 100% if properly recognized and treated.1 Whole body cold water immersion (CWI) is the most effective method of lowering body core temperature.2 Precooling (PC) with CWI before exercise may prevent severe hyperthermia and/or EHS by increasing the body's overall heat-storage capacity.3 However, PC may also alter athletes' perception of how hot they feel or how hard they are exercising...
February 21, 2018: Journal of Sport Rehabilitation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29456380/moxibustion-artemisia-plant-at-acupuncture-point-as-alternative-therapy-in-hypertension-a-promising-approach
#11
Mohammad Jamshed Siddiqui, Mohamad Fadly Bin Kamarudin, Abdul Kareem Mohammed Al-Shami, Siti Zaiton Mat So'ad, Shazia Qasim Jamshed
Hypertension is a pathological condition in which the blood pressure is higher than under normal physiological conditions, i.e., 140/90 mmHg or higher. Blood pressure is measured as the force exerted by the blood pumped by the heart against the walls of arteries (aorta) and distributed throughout the body. Use of complementary and alternative medicine as a cure for hypertension is a common phenomenon because of the high risk of cardiovascular complications and kidney diseases caused by conventional Western medicine...
October 2017: Journal of Pharmacy & Bioallied Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29415213/risk-of-exertional-heat-illnesses-associated-with-sickle-cell-trait-in-u-s-military
#12
Darrell E Singer, Celia Byrne, Ligong Chen, Stephanie Shao, Jonathan Goldsmith, David W Niebuhr
Introduction: A number of studies have found an association between sickle cell trait (SCT) and exertional heat illnesses (EHIs) including heat stroke, a potentially fatal condition. The strength of this association varied across studies, limiting the ability to quantify potential benefits of SCT-screening policies for competitive athletics and military service members. We determined the relative rate and attributable risk of developing EHI associated with being SCT positive and the EHI health care utilization...
February 5, 2018: Military Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29373058/a-functional-return-to-play-progression-after-exertional-heat-stroke-in-a-high-school-football-player
#13
Rebecca M Lopez, Patrick Tanner, Sarah Irani, P Patrick Mularoni
OBJECTIVE:   To present a functional return-to-play (RTP) progression after exertional heat stroke (EHS) in a 17-year-old high school football defensive end (height = 185 cm, mass = 145.5 kg). BACKGROUND:   The patient had no pertinent medical history but moved to a warm climate several days before the EHS occurred. After completing an off-season conditioning test (14- × 110-yd [12.6- × 99.0-m] sprints) on a warm afternoon (temperature = approximately 34°C [93°F], relative humidity = 53%), the patient collapsed...
March 2018: Journal of Athletic Training
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29365179/collapse-in-the-heat-from-overhydration-to-the-emergency-room-three-cases-of-exercise-associated-hyponatremia-associated-with-exertional-heat-illness
#14
Robert C Oh, Bryan Malave, Justin D Chaltry
Exertional heat illness and exercise-associated hyponatremia continue to be a problem in military and recreational events. Symptoms of hyponatremia can be mistaken for heat exhaustion or heat stroke. We describe three cases of symptomatic hyponatremia initially contributed to heat illnesses. The first soldier was a 31-yr-old female who "took a knee" at mile 6 of a 12-mile foot march. She had a core temperature of 100.9°F, a serum sodium level of 129 mmol/L, and drank approximately 4.5 quarts of water in 2 h...
March 1, 2018: Military Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29336710/consensus-statement-prehospital-care-of-exertional-heat-stroke
#15
Luke N Belval, Douglas J Casa, William M Adams, George T Chiampas, Jolie C Holschen, Yuri Hosokawa, John Jardine, Shawn F Kane, Michele Labotz, Renée S Lemieux, Kyle B McClaine, Nathaniel S Nye, Francis G O'Connor, Bryan Prine, Neha P Raukar, Michael S Smith, Rebecca L Stearns
Exertional heat stroke (EHS) is one of the most common causes of sudden death in athletes. It also represents a unique medical challenge to the prehospital healthcare provider due to the time sensitive nature of treatment. In cases of EHS, when cooling is delayed, there is a significant increase in organ damage, morbidity, and mortality after 30 minutes, faster than the average EMS transport and ED evaluation window. The purpose of this document is to present a paradigm for prehospital healthcare systems to minimize the risk of morbidity and mortality for EHS patients...
May 2018: Prehospital Emergency Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29332471/fatal-exertional-heat-stroke-and-american-football-players-the-need-for-regional-heat-safety-guidelines
#16
Andrew J Grundstein, Yuri Hosokawa, Douglas J Casa
CONTEXT:   Weather-based activity modification in athletics is an important way to minimize heat illnesses. However, many commonly used heat-safety guidelines include a uniform set of heat-stress thresholds that do not account for geographic differences in acclimatization. OBJECTIVE:   To determine if heat-related fatalities among American football players occurred on days with unusually stressful weather conditions based on the local climate and to assess the need for regional heat-safety guidelines...
January 2018: Journal of Athletic Training
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29227612/dead-heat-treating-exertional-heat-stroke-is-a-race-against-time-and-temperature
#17
REVIEW
Neha Raukar, Renée S Lemieux, Douglas J Casa, Rachel K Katch
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2017: JEMS: a Journal of Emergency Medical Services
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29095276/outcome-and-risk-factors-associated-with-extent-of-central-nervous-system-injury-due-to-exertional-heat-stroke
#18
Mengmeng Yang, Zhi Li, Yan Zhao, Feihu Zhou, Yu Zhang, Jingli Gao, Ting Yin, Xin Hu, Zhi Mao, Jianguo Xiao, Li Wang, Chao Liu, Liqiong Ma, Zhihao Yuan, Jianfei Lv, Haoliang Shen, Peter C Hou, Hongjun Kang
To explore the relationship between the extent of central nervous system (CNS) injury and patient outcomes meanwhile research the potential risk factors associated with neurologic sequelae. In this retrospective cohort study, we analyzed data from 117 consecutive patients (86 survivors, 31 nonsurvivors) with exertional heat stroke (EHS) who had been admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) at 48 Chinese hospitals between April 2003 and July 2015. Extent of CNS injury was dichotomized according to Glasgow coma scale (GCS) score (severe 3-8, not severe 9-15)...
November 2017: Medicine (Baltimore)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29066054/the-validity-of-the-heat-tolerance-test-in-prediction-of-recurrent-exertional-heat-illness-events
#19
Haggai Schermann, Yuval Heled, Chen Fleischmann, Itay Ketko, Nathan Schiffmann, Yoram Epstein, Ran Yanovich
OBJECTIVES: Heat-tolerance-testing (HTT) protocol is used as a screening test for secondary prevention of exertional heat illness (EHI) in the military. Subjects whose test results are positive (heat-intolerant, HI) are presumed to be at higher risk of repeated EHI events than heat-tolerant subjects (HT) and are therefore prevented from return to combat duty, but may return to unsupervised recreational activity. Our aim was to determine, whether HTT results predict the risk of repeated episodes of exertional heat illness (EHI)...
October 12, 2017: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29020197/sickle-cell-trait-and-heat-injury-among-us-army-soldiers
#20
D Alan Nelson, Patricia A Deuster, Francis G O'Connor, Lianne M Kurina
There is concern that sickle cell trait (SCT) increases risk of exertional collapse, a primary cause of which is heat injury. However, to our knowledge, no population-based studies among active individuals have addressed this, representing a critical evidence gap. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of SCT-tested African-American soldiers who were on active duty in the US Army anytime between January 2011 and December 2014. Using Cox proportional hazards models and adjusting for demographic and medical factors, we observed no significant associations between SCT and either mild heat injury (hazard ratio (HR) = 1...
March 1, 2018: American Journal of Epidemiology
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