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Maternal influenza

Francelena de Sousa Silva, Yonna Costa Barbosa, Mônica Araújo Batalha, Marizélia Rodrigues Costa Ribeiro, Vanda Maria Ferreira Simões, Maria Dos Remédios Freitas Carvalho Branco, Érika Bárbara Abreu Fonseca Thomaz, Rejane Christine de Sousa Queiroz, Waleska Regina Machado Araújo, Antônio Augusto Moura da Silva
This study estimated the percentages of incomplete immunization with new vaccines and old vaccines and associated factors in children 13 to 35 months of age belonging to a birth cohort in São Luís, the capital of Maranhão State, Brazil. The sample was probabilistic, with 3,076 children born in 2010. Information on vaccination was obtained from the Child's Health Card. The new vaccines, namely those introduced in 2010, were meningococcal C and 10-valent pneumococcal, and the old vaccines, or those already on the childhood immunization schedule, were BCG, hepatitis B, human rotavirus, polio, tetravalent (diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, Haemophilus influenzae b), yellow fever, and triple viral (measles, mumps, rubella)...
March 12, 2018: Cadernos de Saúde Pública
Céline Deblanc, Séverine Hervé, Stéphane Gorin, Charlie Cador, Mathieu Andraud, Stéphane Quéguiner, Nicolas Barbier, Frédéric Paboeuf, Nicolas Rose, Gaëlle Simon
Maternally-derived antibodies (MDA) reduce piglet susceptibility to swine influenza A virus, but interfere with post-infectious immune responses, raising questions about protection after waning of passive immunity. We therefore analysed the impact of different levels of residual MDA on virus excretion and immune responses in piglets born to vaccinated sows (MDA+) and infected with H1N1 at 5, 7 or 11 weeks of age, in comparison to piglets born to unvaccinated sows (MDA-). Subsequent protection against a second homologous infection occurring 4 weeks after the primo-infection was also investigated...
March 2018: Veterinary Microbiology
Haiyun Jin, Wan Wang, Xueqin Yang, Hailong Su, Jiawen Fan, Rui Zhu, Shifeng Wang, Huoying Shi, Xiufan Liu
BACKGROUND: Vaccines constitute a unique selective pressure, different from natural selection, drives the evolution of influenza virus. In this study, A/Chicken/Shanghai/F/1998 (H9N2) was continually passaged in specific pathogen-free embryonated chicken eggs with or without selective pressures from antibodies induced by homologous maternal antibodies. Genetic mutations, antigenic drift, replication, and pathogenicity of the passaged virus were evaluated. RESULTS: Antigenic drift of the passaged viruses occurred in the 47th generation (vF47) under selective pressure on antibodies and in the 52nd generation (nF52) without selective pressure from antibodies...
March 6, 2018: BMC Veterinary Research
Sushena Krishnaswamy, Allen C Cheng, Euan M Wallace, Jim Buttery, Michelle Giles
The role of maternal vaccination in reducing neonatal morbidity and mortality is expanding but uptake remains suboptimal. While the barriers to uptake have been well described, women from minority groups have not been well represented in previous studies. In this study we examine the facilitators and barriers to uptake of antenatal vaccination by women from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds in Melbourne, Australia. 537 women attending antenatal care completed a survey; 69% were born overseas...
March 1, 2018: Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics
Kathleen M Neuzil
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 24, 2018: Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Edwin P Armitage, Janko Camara, Sulayman Bah, Alice S Forster, Ed Clarke, Beate Kampmann, Thushan I de Silva
BACKGROUND: The burden of influenza is increasingly recognised in Africa. The WHO recommends introducing influenza vaccination to high-risk groups: pregnant women, children <5 years, and the elderly. The Gambia currently has no influenza vaccination policy, but the NASIMMUNE study, a clinical trial of intranasal live attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIV) in young children provided an opportunity to study maternal attitudes towards LAIV for the first time in sub-Saharan Africa. We assess acceptability of LAIV, influenza knowledge and attitudes towards influenza vaccination in Gambian women...
February 23, 2018: Vaccine
Alisa Kachikis, Linda O Eckert, Janet Englund
Maternal immunization for prevention of morbidity and mortality of pregnant women and their neonates due to infectious diseases is ongoing worldwide. The complexity of vaccine research and development in this population is challenging. Not only do vaccines for pregnant women require evidence of immunogenicity, potency, stability, and limited reactogenicity, they must also provide efficacy in decreasing morbidity for the pregnant woman, her fetus, and the neonate, demonstrate safety or lack of evidence of harm, and offer benefit or potential benefit of vaccination during pregnancy...
February 23, 2018: Viral Immunology
Chunli Liu, Wenqing Sun, Chunting Wang, Fenglin Liu, Mingxiang Zhou
OBJECTIVE: To report a case of labour induction during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support in a patient with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) caused by influenza and review of the literature. METHODS: Case report and the literature search of all English articles on delivery while on ECMO in patients with ARDS caused by influenza. RESULTS: A 25-year-old pregnant woman was initiated with ECMO due to severe ARDS caused by influenza A (H1N1) virus...
February 22, 2018: Journal of Maternal-fetal & Neonatal Medicine
Lakshmi Sukumaran, Natalie L McCarthy, Elyse O Kharbanda, Gabriela Vazquez-Benitez, Heather S Lipkind, Lisa Jackson, Nicola P Klein, Allison L Naleway, David L McClure, Rulin C Hechter, Alison T Kawai, Jason M Glanz, Eric S Weintraub
BACKGROUND: The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices currently recommends pregnant women receive influenza and tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccines. There are limited studies of the long-term safety in infants for vaccines administered during pregnancy. We evaluate whether maternal receipt of influenza and Tdap vaccines increases the risk of infant hospitalization or death in the first 6 months of life. METHODS: We included singleton, live birth pregnancies in the Vaccine Safety Datalink between 2004 and 2014...
February 20, 2018: Pediatrics
Joanne Katz, Janet A Englund, Mark C Steinhoff, Subarna K Khatry, Laxman Shrestha, Jane Kuypers, Luke C Mullany, Helen Y Chu, Steven C LeClerq, Naoko Kozuki, James M Tielsch
Background: Maternal influenza vaccination protects mothers and their infants in low resource settings but little is known about whether the protection varies by gestational age at vaccination. Methods: Women of childbearing age in rural southern Nepal were surveilled for pregnancy, consented and randomized to receive maternal influenza vaccination or placebo, with randomization stratified on gestational age (17-25 or 26-34 weeks). Enrollment occurred in two annual cohorts and vaccinations occurred from April 2011 through September 2013...
February 14, 2018: Clinical Infectious Diseases: An Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America
Marta C Nunes, Shabir A Madhi
The influenza virus circulates yearly and causes global epidemics. Influenza infection affects all age groups and causes mild to severe illness, and young infants are at particular risk for serious disease. The most effective measure to prevent influenza disease is vaccination; however, no vaccine is licensed for use in infants younger than 6 months old. Thus, there is a crucial need for other preventive strategies in this high-risk age group. Influenza vaccination during pregnancy protects both the mothers and the young infants against influenza infection...
2018: F1000Research
Sarah E Wilson, Hannah Chung, Kevin L Schwartz, Astrid Guttmann, Shelley L Deeks, Jeffrey C Kwong, Natasha S Crowcroft, Laura Wing, Karen Tu
BACKGROUND: In August 2011, Ontario, Canada introduced a rotavirus immunization program using Rotarix™ vaccine. No assessments of rotavirus vaccine coverage have been previously conducted in Ontario. METHODS: We assessed vaccine coverage (series initiation and completion) and factors associated with uptake using the Electronic Medical Record Administrative data Linked Database (EMRALD), a collection of family physician electronic medical records (EMR) linked to health administrative data...
2018: PloS One
Saad B Omer, Dayna R Clark, Anushka R Aqil, Milagritos D Tapia, Marta C Nunes, Naoko Kozuki, Mark C Steinhoff, Shabir A Madhi, Niteen Wairagkar
BACKGROUND: To evaluate the effect of antenatal influenza vaccination on all-cause severe infant pneumonia, we performed pooled analysis of three randomized-controlled trials conducted in Nepal, Mali, and South Africa. METHODS: The trials were coordinated from the planning phase. The follow-up period was 0-6 months post-partum in Nepal and Mali, and 0-24 weeks in South Africa. Pregnant women with gestational age 17-34 weeks in Nepal, ≥28 weeks in Mali, and 20-36 weeks in South Africa were enrolled...
February 13, 2018: Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Hakan Ozdogu, Can Boga, Suheyl Asma, Ilknur Kozanoglu, Cigdem Gereklioglu, Mahmut Yeral, Nurhilal Turgut Buyukkurt, Soner Solmaz, Aslı Korur, Pelin Aytan, Erkan Maytalman, Mutlu Kasar
The Eastern Mediterranean is among the regions where sickle cell disease (SCD) is common. The morbidity and mortality of this disease can be postponed to adulthood through therapies implemented in childhood. The present study focuses on the organ damage-reducing effects of the Baskent Sickle Cell Medical Care Development Program (BASCARE), which was developed by a team who lives in this region and has approximately 25 years of experience. The deliverables of the program included the development of an electronic health recording system (PRANA) and electronic vaccination system; the use of low citrate infusion in routine prophylactic automatic erythrocyte exchange (ARCE) programs including pregnant women; the use of leukocyte-filtered and irradiated blood for transfusion; the use of magnetic resonance imaging methods (T2) for the management of transfusion-related hemosiderosis; and the implementation of an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation protocol for adult patients...
February 2018: Medicine (Baltimore)
Luz Maria Vilca, Cristina Martínez, Miriam Burballa, Magda Campins
Objective Maternal care providers (MCPs), obstetrician-gynaecologists and midwives are uniquely placed to increase maternal vaccination acceptance. We aimed to assess their knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding influenza and pertussis vaccination during pregnancy. Methods We conducted an online survey among MCPs working at "Attention to Sexual and Reproductive Health" (ASSIR) Units in Catalonia region. The survey included questions about current recommendations of influenza and pertussis immunization during pregnancy, reasons for not routinely recommending vaccination and several strategies to increase vaccination uptake...
February 7, 2018: Maternal and Child Health Journal
Sushena Krishnaswamy, Euan M Wallace, Jim Buttery, Michelle L Giles
Maternal vaccination is a safe and effective strategy to reduce maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality from pertussis and influenza. However, despite recommendations for maternal vaccination since 2010, uptake remains suboptimal. Barriers to uptake have been studied widely and include lack of integration of vaccination into routine pregnancy care and access to vaccination services. Standing orders for administration of vaccines without the need for a physician review or prescription have been demonstrated to improve uptake as part of multi-model interventions to increase antenatal influenza and post-partum pertussis vaccination...
January 30, 2018: Vaccine
Indu Malhotra, A Desiree LaBeaud, Nathan Morris, Maxim McKibben, Peter Mungai, Eric Muchiri, Christopher L King, Charles H King
Background: Antenatal exposure to parasites can affect infants' subsequent responses to vaccination. The present study investigated how maternal prenatal infections and newborns' anti-parasite cytokine profiles relate to IgG responses to standard vaccination during infancy. Methods: 450 Kenyan women were tested for parasitic infections during pregnancy. Their newborns' responses to malaria, schistosome, and filaria antigens were assessed in cord blood (CB) lymphocytes...
January 30, 2018: Journal of Infectious Diseases
Anastasia Phillips, Frank Beard, Kristine Macartney, Jocelyn Chan, Robin Gilmour, Gemma Saravanos, Peter McIntyre
AIM: To identify and describe potentially vaccine-preventable child deaths in New South Wales (NSW). METHODS: Child deaths in NSW from 2005 to 2014 potentially preventable by vaccination were identified from the NSW Child Death Register (maintained by the NSW Ombudsman) and the Notifiable Conditions Information Management System (NSW Health). Medical and post-mortem records were reviewed. Cases were classified as vaccine-preventable based on the strength of evidence for the relevant infection causing death and likelihood that death was preventable through vaccination...
January 11, 2018: Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health
Lucy K Somerville, Kerri Basile, Dominic E Dwyer, Jen Kok
Data from previous seasonal epidemics and pandemics have confirmed that pregnant women are at increased risk for severe influenza virus infection. Complications including fetal loss, higher rates of hospitalization and maternal death are most notable during the late gestational period. Antiviral therapy and influenza vaccination are recommended in pregnant women as both are effective and safe. This review discusses the epidemiology, pathophysiology, treatment and prevention of influenza virus infection in pregnancy, with a focus on recent developments...
February 2018: Future Microbiology
Sarah Anderson, Lorie M Harper, Jodie Dionne-Odom, Gregory Halle-Ekane, Alan T N Tita
OBJECTIVE: To compare prenatal maternal hepatitis B virus (HBV) screening and infant vaccination strategies to inform policy on HBV prevention in Sub-Saharan Africa. METHODS: A decision analytic model was created using previously published data to assess the ability of three intervention strategies to prevent HBV infection by age 10 years. Strategy 1 comprised of universal vaccination with a pentavalent vaccine (HBV, diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, and Haemophilus influenzae) at age 6 weeks...
January 8, 2018: International Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics
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