Read by QxMD icon Read

disruptive disorder

Antonella Sferra, Fabiana Fattori, Teresa Rizza, Elsabetta Flex, Emanuele Bellacchio, Alessandro Bruselles, Stefania Petrini, Serena Cecchetti, Massimo Teson, Fabrizia Restaldi, Andrea Ciolfi, Filippo M Santorelli, Ginevra Zanni, Sabina Barresi, Claudia Castiglioni, Marco Tartaglia, Enrico Bertini
Microtubules participate in fundamental cellular processes, including chromosomal segregation and cell division, migration, and intracellular trafficking. Their proper function is required for correct central nervous system development and operative preservation, and mutations in genes coding tubulins, the constituting units of microtubules, underlie a family of neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases, collectively known as "tubulinopathies", characterized by a wide range of neuronal defects resulting from defective proliferation, migration, and function...
March 14, 2018: Human Molecular Genetics
Andrzej T Slominski, Michal A Zmijewski, Przemyslaw M Plonka, Jerzy P Szaflarski, Ralf Paus
The skin, a self-regulating protective barrier organ, is empowered with sensory and computing capabilities to counteract the environmental stressors to maintain/restore disrupted cutaneous homeostasis. These complex functions are coordinated by a cutaneous neuro-endocrine system that also communicates in a bidirectional fashion with the central nervous, endocrine and immune systems, all acting in concert to control body homeostasis. While ultraviolet energy (UV) has played an important role in the origin and evolution of life, UV absorption by the skin not only triggers mechanisms that defend skin integrity and regulate global homeostasis, but also induces skin pathology (e...
March 12, 2018: Endocrinology
Florian Ferreri, Alexis Bourla, Stephane Mouchabac, Laurent Karila
Background: New technologies can profoundly change the way we understand psychiatric pathologies and addictive disorders. New concepts are emerging with the development of more accurate means of collecting live data, computerized questionnaires, and the use of passive data. Digital phenotyping , a paradigmatic example, refers to the use of computerized measurement tools to capture the characteristics of different psychiatric disorders. Similarly, machine learning-a form of artificial intelligence-can improve the classification of patients based on patterns that clinicians have not always considered in the past...
2018: Frontiers in Psychiatry
Sean C Edington, Andrea Gonzalez, Thomas R Middendorf, D Brent Halling, Richard W Aldrich, Carlos R Baiz
The Ca2+ -sensing protein calmodulin (CaM) is a popular model of biological ion binding since it is both experimentally tractable and essential to survival in all eukaryotic cells. CaM modulates hundreds of target proteins and is sensitive to complex patterns of Ca2+ exposure, indicating that it functions as a sophisticated dynamic transducer rather than a simple on/off switch. Many details of this transduction function are not well understood. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, ultrafast 2D infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy, and electronic structure calculations were used to probe interactions between bound metal ions (Ca2+ and several trivalent lanthanide ions) and the carboxylate groups in CaM's EF-hand ion-coordinating sites...
March 15, 2018: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Rachel C Lombardo, Aleksey Porollo, James F Cnota, Robert J Hopkin
PurposeCongenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS, OMIM 209880) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutation in PHOX2B that manifests as a consequence of abnormal neural crest cell migration during embryogenesis. Unlike other neurocristopathies, however, its impact on the cardiovascular system has not been previously assessed. This study was an effort to characterize the association between congenital heart disease (CHD) and mutations in PHOX2B in patients with CCHS.MethodsA retrospective review of patients with CCHS in conjunction with functional analysis of PHOX2B mutations associated with CHD was performed...
March 15, 2018: Genetics in Medicine: Official Journal of the American College of Medical Genetics
N Kaji, S Nakayama, K Horiguchi, S Iino, H Ozaki, M Hori
BACKGROUND: Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) serve as intestinal pacemakers. Postoperative ileus (POI) is a gastrointestinal motility disorder that occurs following abdominal surgery, which is caused by inflammation-induced dysfunction of smooth muscles and enteric neurons. However, the participation of ICC in POI is not well understood. In this study, we investigated the functional changes of ICC in a mouse model of POI. METHODS: Intestinal manipulation (IM) was performed to induce POI...
March 15, 2018: Neurogastroenterology and Motility: the Official Journal of the European Gastrointestinal Motility Society
M G Carta, A Preti, H S Akiskal
Human population is increasing in immense cities with millions of inhabitants, in which life is expected to run 24 hours a day for seven days a week (24/7). Noise and light pollution are the most reported consequences, with a profound impact on sleep patterns and circadian biorhythms. Disruption of sleep and biorhythms has severe consequences on many metabolic pathways. Suppression of melatonin incretion at night and the subsequent effect on DNA methylation may increase the risk of prostate and breast cancer...
2018: Clinical Practice and Epidemiology in Mental Health: CP & EMH
Poornima Kumar, Franziska Goer, Laura Murray, Daniel G Dillon, Miranda L Beltzer, Andrew L Cohen, Nancy H Brooks, Diego A Pizzagalli
Anhedonia (hyposensitivity to rewards) and negative bias (hypersensitivity to punishments) are core features of major depressive disorder (MDD), which could stem from abnormal reinforcement learning. Emerging evidence highlights blunted reward learning and reward prediction error (RPE) signaling in the striatum in MDD, although inconsistencies exist. Preclinical studies have clarified that ventral tegmental area (VTA) neurons encode RPE and habenular neurons encode punishment prediction error (PPE), which are then transmitted to the striatum and cortex to guide goal-directed behavior...
February 26, 2018: Neuropsychopharmacology: Official Publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology
Jodi R Paul, Hira A Munir, Thomas van Groen, Karen L Gamble
Disruption of circadian rhythms is commonly reported in individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Neurons in the primary circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), exhibit daily rhythms in spontaneous neuronal activity which are important for maintaining circadian behavioral rhythms. Disruption of SCN neuronal activity has been reported in animal models of other neurodegenerative disorders; however, the effect of AD on SCN neurophysiology remains unknown. In this study we examined circadian behavioral and electrophysiological changes in a mouse model of AD, using male mice from the Tg-SwDI line which expresses human amyloid precursor protein with the familial Swedish (K670N/M671L), Dutch (E693Q), Iowa (D694N) mutations...
March 11, 2018: Neurobiology of Disease
John Russell, Emily Lodge, Cynthia Andoniadou
<br>As a central regulator of major physiological processes, the pituitary gland is a highly dynamic organ, capable of responding to hormonal demand and hypothalamic influence, through adapting secretion as well as remodelling cell numbers among its seven populations of differentiated cells. Stem cells of the pituitary have been shown to actively generate new cells during postnatal development but remain mostly quiescent during adulthood, where they persist as a long-lived population. Despite a significant body of research characterising attributes of anterior pituitary stem cells, the regulation of this population is poorly understood...
March 14, 2018: Neuroendocrinology
Eli T Newcomb, Louis P Hagopian
Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and intellectual disabilities (ID) present with problem behaviour at rates disproportionately higher than their typically-developing peers. Problem behaviour, such as self-injury, aggression, pica, disruption, and elopement result in a diminished quality-of-life for the individual and family. Applied behaviour analysis has a well-established research base, detailing a number of assessment and treatment methods designed to address behaviour problems in children with ASD and ID...
March 14, 2018: International Review of Psychiatry
Kylie D Rock, Heather B Patisaul
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: With the incidence of neurodevelopmental disorders on the rise, it is imperative to identify and understand the mechanisms by which environmental contaminants can impact the developing brain and heighten risk. Here, we report on recent findings regarding novel mechanisms of developmental neurotoxicity and highlight chemicals of concern, beyond traditionally defined neurotoxicants. RECENT FINDINGS: The perinatal window represents a critical and extremely vulnerable period of time during which chemical insult can alter the morphological and functional trajectory of the developing brain...
March 13, 2018: Current Environmental Health Reports
Yi-Heng Tai, Yu-Yi Lin, Kai-Chen Wang, Chao-Lin Chang, Ru-Yin Chen, Chia-Chu Wu, Irene H Cheng
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent neurodegenerative disorder and is triggered via abnormal accumulation of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ). Aggregated Aβ is responsible for disrupting calcium homeostasis, inducing neuroinflammation, and promoting neurodegeneration. In this study, we generated curcuminoid submicron particle (CSP), which reduce the average size to ~60 nm in diameter. CSP had elevated the bioavailability in vivo and better neuroprotective effect against oligomeric Aβ than un-nanosized curcuminoids in vitro ...
February 13, 2018: Oncotarget
Marie E Gaine, Snehajyoti Chatterjee, Ted Abel
Sleep deprivation disrupts the lives of millions of people every day and has a profound impact on the molecular biology of the brain. These effects begin as changes within a neuron, at the DNA and RNA level, and result in alterations in neuronal plasticity and dysregulation of many cognitive functions including learning and memory. The epigenome plays a critical role in regulating gene expression in the context of memory storage. In this review article, we begin by describing the effects of epigenetic alterations on the regulation of gene expression, focusing on the most common epigenetic mechanisms: (i) DNA methylation; (ii) histone modifications; and (iii) non-coding RNAs...
2018: Frontiers in Neural Circuits
Boldizsár Czéh, Szilvia A Nagy
Depressive disorders are complex, multifactorial mental disorders with unknown neurobiology. Numerous theories aim to explain the pathophysiology. According to the "gliocentric theory", glial abnormalities are responsible for the development of the disease. The aim of this review article is to summarize the rapidly growing number of cellular and molecular evidences indicating disturbed glial functioning in depressive disorders. We focus here exclusively on the clinical studies and present the in vivo neuroimaging findings together with the postmortem molecular and histopathological data...
2018: Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience
Mitsuko Nakashima, Mitsuhiro Kato, Kazushi Aoto, Masaaki Shiina, Hazrat Belal, Souichi Mukaida, Satoko Kumada, Atsushi Sato, Ayelet Zerem, Tally Lerman-Sagie, Dorit Lev, Huey Yin Leong, Yoshinori Tsurusaki, Takeshi Mizuguchi, Satoko Miyatake, Noriko Miyake, Kazuhiro Ogata, Hirotomo Saitsu, Naomichi Matsumoto
OBJECTIVE: The cytoplasmic fragile X mental retardation 1 interacting proteins 2 (CYFIP2) is a component of the WAVE regulatory complex, which is involved in actin dynamics. An obvious association of CYFIP2 variants with human neurological disorders has never been reported. Here, we identified de novo hotspot CYFIP2 variants in neurodevelopmental disorders and explore the possible involvement of the CYFIP2 mutants in the WAVE signaling pathway. METHODS: We performed trio-based whole exome sequencing (WES) in 210 families and case-only WES in 489 individuals with epileptic encephalopathies...
March 13, 2018: Annals of Neurology
Hilary B Hodgdon, Rachel Liebman, Lia Martin, Michael Suvak, Kari Beserra, Wendy Rosenblum, Joseph Spinazzola
Risk for traumatic sequelae is conveyed directly by risk factors (i.e., exposure to trauma), and via the disruption of developmental competencies. Exposure to caregiver trauma is an especially salient risk factor, as its early and pervasive nature is likely to undermine multiple facets of development, most notably the emergence of cognitive controls (i.e., executive function [EF]). Deficits in EF have been observed among youth exposed to multiple types of trauma and are associated with a range of functional impairments, posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS), and behavioral disorders; they represent a mechanism by which the negative impact of caregiver trauma is conveyed...
March 13, 2018: Journal of Traumatic Stress
Summer J Rozzi, Valeria Avdoshina, Jerel A Fields, Italo Mocchetti
Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV) infection of the central nervous system promotes neuronal injury that culminates in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Viral proteins, including transactivator of transcription (Tat), have emerged as leading candidates to explain HIV-mediated neurotoxicity, though the mechanisms remain unclear. Tat transgenic mice or neurons exposed to Tat, which show neuronal loss, exhibit smaller mitochondria as compared to controls. To provide an experimental clue as to which mechanisms are used by Tat to promote changes in mitochondrial morphology, rat cortical neurons were exposed to Tat (100 nM) for various time points...
December 2018: Cell Death Discovery
Claudio Toma, Alex D Shaw, Richard J N Allcock, Anna Heath, Kerrie D Pierce, Philip B Mitchell, Peter R Schofield, Janice M Fullerton
Bipolar disorder (BD) is a complex psychiatric condition with high heritability, the genetic architecture of which likely comprises both common variants of small effect and rare variants of higher penetrance, the latter of which are largely unknown. Extended families with high density of illness provide an opportunity to map novel risk genes or consolidate evidence for existing candidates, by identifying genes carrying pathogenic rare variants. We performed whole-exome sequencing (WES) in 15 BD families (117 subjects, of whom 72 were affected), augmented with copy number variant (CNV) microarray data, to examine contributions of multiple classes of rare genetic variants within a familial context...
March 13, 2018: Translational Psychiatry
Claude Rouillard, Joanie Baillargeon, Brigitte Paquet, Michel St-Hilaire, Jérôme Maheux, Catherine Lévesque, Noémie Darlix, Simon Majeur, Daniel Lévesque
Parkinson's disease (PD) is an idiopathic progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the loss of midbrain dopamine neurons. Levodopa (l-dopa) is the main pharmacological approach to relieve PD motor symptoms. However, chronic treatment with l-Dopa is inevitably associated with the generation of abnormal involuntary movements (l-Dopa-induced dyskinesia). We have previously shown that Nr4a1 (Nur77), a transcription factor of the nuclear receptor family, is closely associated with dopamine neurotransmission in the mature brain...
March 9, 2018: Experimental Neurology
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"