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Peter Dayan

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29760843/multicenter-study-of-albuterol-use-among-infants-hospitalized-with-bronchiolitis
#1
Anna Condella, Jonathan M Mansbach, Kohei Hasegawa, Peter S Dayan, Ashley F Sullivan, Janice A Espinola, Carlos A Camargo
Introduction: Although bronchiolitis is a common reason for infant hospitalization, significant heterogeneity persists in its management. The American Academy of Pediatrics currently recommends that inhaled albuterol not be used in routine care of children with bronchiolitis. Our objective was to identify factors associated with pre-admission (e.g., emergency department or primary care) use of albuterol among infants hospitalized for bronchiolitis. Methods: We analyzed data from a 17-center observational study of 1,016 infants (age <1 year) hospitalized with bronchiolitis between 2011-2014...
May 2018: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29752468/foraging-for-foundations-in-decision-neuroscience-insights-from-ethology
#2
REVIEW
Dean Mobbs, Pete C Trimmer, Daniel T Blumstein, Peter Dayan
Modern decision neuroscience offers a powerful and broad account of human behaviour using computational techniques that link psychological and neuroscientific approaches to the ways that individuals can generate near-optimal choices in complex controlled environments. However, until recently, relatively little attention has been paid to the extent to which the structure of experimental environments relates to natural scenarios, and the survival problems that individuals have evolved to solve. This situation not only risks leaving decision-theoretic accounts ungrounded but also makes various aspects of the solutions, such as hard-wired or Pavlovian policies, difficult to interpret in the natural world...
May 11, 2018: Nature Reviews. Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29706512/decodability-of-reward-learning-signals-predicts-mood-fluctuations
#3
Eran Eldar, Charlotte Roth, Peter Dayan, Raymond J Dolan
Our mood often fluctuates without warning. Recent accounts propose that these fluctuations might be preceded by changes in how we process reward. According to this view, the degree to which reward improves our mood reflects not only characteristics of the reward itself (e.g., its magnitude) but also how receptive to reward we happen to be. Differences in receptivity to reward have been suggested to play an important role in the emergence of mood episodes in psychiatric disorders [1-16]. However, despite substantial theory, the relationship between reward processing and daily fluctuations of mood has yet to be tested directly...
April 20, 2018: Current Biology: CB
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29645365/pre-procedural-ultrasound-for-infant-lumbar-puncture-a-randomized-clinical-trial
#4
David Kessler, Vartan Pahalyants, Joshua Kriger, Gerald Behr, Peter Dayan
BACKGROUND: Our purpose was to determine the potential effect of pre-procedural ultrasound to increase lumbar puncture (LP) success compared with standard palpation method. Further, we assessed feasibility of and clinician satisfaction with a standardized ultrasound protocol. METHODS: This prospective, two-arm, parallel group randomized trial was conducted in a single-center pediatric emergency department. We compared pre-procedural ultrasound vs. palpation method on success with infant LPs...
April 12, 2018: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29642996/retraction-a-mathematical-model-explains-saturating-axon-guidance-responses-to-molecular-gradients
#5
Huyen Nguyen, Peter Dayan, Zac Pujic, Justin Cooper-White, Geoffrey J Goodhill
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 12, 2018: ELife
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29620972/an-online-survey-of-hypothyroid-patients-demonstrates-prominent-dissatisfaction
#6
Sarah J Peterson, Anne R Cappola, M Regina Castro, Colin M Dayan, Alan P Farwell, James V Hennessey, Peter A Kopp, Douglas S Ross, Mary H Samuels, Anna M Sawka, Peter N Taylor, Jacqueline Jonklaas, Antonio C Bianco
BACKGROUND: Approximately 15% more patients taking levothyroxine (LT4) report impaired quality of life compared to controls. This could be explained by additional diagnoses independently affecting quality of life and complicating assignment of causation. This study sought to investigate the underpinnings of reduced quality of life in hypothyroid patients and to provide data for discussion at a symposium addressing hypothyroidism. METHODS: An online survey for hypothyroid patients was posted on the American Thyroid Association Web site and forwarded to multiple groups...
April 5, 2018: Thyroid: Official Journal of the American Thyroid Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29601050/editorial
#7
EDITORIAL
Peter Dayan, Read Montague
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2017: Computational psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29569622/global-epidemiology-of-hyperthyroidism-and-hypothyroidism
#8
REVIEW
Peter N Taylor, Diana Albrecht, Anna Scholz, Gala Gutierrez-Buey, John H Lazarus, Colin M Dayan, Onyebuchi E Okosieme
Thyroid hormones are essential for growth, neuronal development, reproduction and regulation of energy metabolism. Hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism are common conditions with potentially devastating health consequences that affect all populations worldwide. Iodine nutrition is a key determinant of thyroid disease risk; however, other factors, such as ageing, smoking status, genetic susceptibility, ethnicity, endocrine disruptors and the advent of novel therapeutics, including immune checkpoint inhibitors, also influence thyroid disease epidemiology...
March 23, 2018: Nature Reviews. Endocrinology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29535251/development-and-validation-of-a-novel-pediatric-appendicitis-risk-calculator-parc
#9
Anupam B Kharbanda, Gabriela Vazquez-Benitez, Dustin W Ballard, David R Vinson, Uli K Chettipally, Mamata V Kene, Steven P Dehmer, Richard G Bachur, Peter S Dayan, Nathan Kuppermann, Patrick J O'Connor, Elyse O Kharbanda
OBJECTIVES: We sought to develop and validate a clinical calculator that can be used to quantify risk for appendicitis on a continuous scale for patients with acute abdominal pain. METHODS: The pediatric appendicitis risk calculator (pARC) was developed and validated through secondary analyses of 3 distinct cohorts. The derivation sample included visits to 9 pediatric emergency departments between March 2009 and April 2010. The validation sample included visits to a single pediatric emergency department from 2003 to 2004 and 2013 to 2015...
April 2018: Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29467136/attitudes-and-perceptions-of-health-professionals-towards-management-of-hypothyroidism-in-general-practice-a-qualitative-interview-study
#10
Rosie Dew, Kathryn King, Onyebuchi E Okosieme, Simon H Pearce, Gemma Donovan, Peter N Taylor, Janis Hickey, Colin M Dayan, Graham Leese, Salman Razvi, Scott Wilkes
OBJECTIVE: To explore the attitudes and perceptions of health professionals towards management of hypothyroidism that contributes to the suboptimal treatment of hypothyroidism in general practice. DESIGN: A qualitative interview study using semistructured interviews. PARTICIPANTS: Sixteen participants were interviewed between March and August 2016 comprising nine general practitioners (GPs), four pharmacists, two practice nurses and one nurse practitioner...
February 21, 2018: BMJ Open
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29447153/a-model-of-risk-and-mental-state-shifts-during-social-interaction
#11
Andreas Hula, Iris Vilares, Terry Lohrenz, Peter Dayan, P Read Montague
Cooperation and competition between human players in repeated microeconomic games offer a window onto social phenomena such as the establishment, breakdown and repair of trust. However, although a suitable starting point for the quantitative analysis of such games exists, namely the Interactive Partially Observable Markov Decision Process (I-POMDP), computational considerations and structural limitations have limited its application, and left unmodelled critical features of behavior in a canonical trust task...
February 2018: PLoS Computational Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29440429/locus-coeruleus-integrity-in-old-age-is-selectively-related-to-memories-linked-with-salient-negative-events
#12
Dorothea Hämmerer, Martina F Callaghan, Alexandra Hopkins, Julian Kosciessa, Matthew Betts, Arturo Cardenas-Blanco, Martin Kanowski, Nikolaus Weiskopf, Peter Dayan, Raymond J Dolan, Emrah Düzel
The locus coeruleus (LC) is the principal origin of noradrenaline in the brain. LC integrity varies considerably across healthy older individuals, and is suggested to contribute to altered cognitive functions in aging. Here we test this hypothesis using an incidental memory task that is known to be susceptible to noradrenergic modulation. We used MRI neuromelanin (NM) imaging to assess LC structural integrity and pupillometry as a putative index of LC activation in both younger and older adults. We show that older adults with reduced structural LC integrity show poorer subsequent memory...
February 27, 2018: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29427374/economic-analysis-of-diagnostic-imaging-in-pediatric-patients-with-suspected-appendicitis
#13
Anupam B Kharbanda, Eric W Christensen, Nanette C Dudley, Lalit Bajaj, Michelle D Stevenson, Charles G Macias, Manoj K Mittal, Richard G Bachur, Jonathan E Bennett, Kelly Sinclair, Brianna McMichael, Peter S Dayan
OBJECTIVE: The use of computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound (US) in patients with acute abdominal pain has substantial variation across pediatric emergency departments (EDs). This study compares the cost of diagnosing and treating suspected appendicitis across a multicenter network of children's hospitals. METHODS: This study is a secondary analysis using deidentified data of a prospective, observational study of patients with suspected appendicitis at nine pediatric EDs...
February 10, 2018: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29396245/combined-immunosuppression-and-radiotherapy-in-thyroid-eye-disease-cirted-a-multicentre-2-%C3%A3-2-factorial-double-blind-randomised-controlled-trial
#14
Rathie Rajendram, Peter N Taylor, Victoria J Wilson, Nicola Harris, Olivia C Morris, Marjorie Tomlinson, Sue Yarrow, Helen Garrott, Helen M Herbert, Andrew D Dick, Anne Cook, Rao Gattamaneni, Rajni Jain, Jane Olver, Steven J Hurel, Fion Bremner, Suzannah R Drummond, Ewan Kemp, Diana M Ritchie, Nichola Rumsey, Daniel Morris, Carol Lane, Nachi Palaniappan, Chunhei Li, Julie Pell, Robert Hills, Daniel G Ezra, Mike J Potts, Sue Jackson, Geoffrey E Rose, Nicholas Plowman, Catey Bunce, Jimmy M Uddin, Richard W J Lee, Colin M Dayan
BACKGROUND: Standard treatment for thyroid eye disease is with systemic corticosteroids. We aimed to establish whether orbital radiotherapy or antiproliferative immunosuppression would confer any additional benefit. METHODS: CIRTED was a multicentre, double-blind, randomised controlled trial with a 2 × 2 factorial design done at six centres in the UK. Adults with active moderate-to-severe thyroid eye disease associated with proptosis or ocular motility restriction were recruited to the trial...
April 2018: Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29346569/controlled-antenatal-thyroid-screening-ii-effect-of-treating-maternal-sub-optimal-thyroid-function-on-child-cognition
#15
Charlotte Hales, Peter N Taylor, Sue Channon, Ruth Paradice, Kirsten McEwan, Lei Zhang, Michael Gyedu, Ameen Bakhsh, Onyebuchi Okosieme, Ilaria Muller, Mohd S Draman, John W Gregory, Colin Dayan, John H Lazarus, D Aled Rees, Marian Ludgate
Context & Objective: The Controlled Antenatal Thyroid Screening (CATS) study investigated treatment for suboptimal gestational thyroid function (SGTF) on childhood cognition and found no difference in IQ at 3 years between children of treated and untreated SGTF mothers. We have measured IQ in the same children at age 9.5-years and included children from normal-GTF mothers. Design, Setting & Participants: One examiner, blinded to participant group, assessed children's IQ (WISC-IV), long-term memory and motor function (NEPSY-II) from children of 119 treated and 98 untreated SGTF mothers plus children of 232 mothers with normal-GTF...
January 15, 2018: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29339564/accuracy-of-the-urinalysis-for-urinary-tract-infections-in-febrile-infants-60-days-and-younger
#16
Leah Tzimenatos, Prashant Mahajan, Peter S Dayan, Melissa Vitale, James G Linakis, Stephen Blumberg, Dominic Borgialli, Richard M Ruddy, John Van Buren, Octavio Ramilo, Nathan Kuppermann
OBJECTIVES: Reports of the test accuracy of the urinalysis for diagnosing urinary tract infections (UTIs) in young febrile infants have been variable. We evaluated the test characteristics of the urinalysis for diagnosing UTIs, with and without associated bacteremia, in young febrile infants. METHODS: We performed a planned secondary analysis of data from a prospective study of febrile infants ≤60 days old at 26 emergency departments in the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network...
February 2018: Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29338004/interrupting-behaviour-minimizing-decision-costs-via-temporal-commitment-and-low-level-interrupts
#17
Kevin Lloyd, Peter Dayan
Ideal decision-makers should constantly assess all sources of information about opportunities and threats, and be able to redetermine their choices promptly in the face of change. However, perpetual monitoring and reassessment impose inordinate sensing and computational costs, making them impractical for animals and machines alike. The obvious alternative of committing for extended periods of time to limited sensory strategies associated with particular courses of action can be dangerous and wasteful. Here, we explore the intermediate possibility of making provisional temporal commitments whilst admitting interruption based on limited broader observation...
January 2018: PLoS Computational Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29297512/the-protective-action-encoding-of-serotonin-transients-in-the-human-brain
#18
Rosalyn J Moran, Kenneth T Kishida, Terry Lohrenz, Ignacio Saez, Adrian W Laxton, Mark R Witcher, Stephen B Tatter, Thomas L Ellis, Paul Em Phillips, Peter Dayan, P Read Montague
The role of serotonin in human brain function remains elusive due, at least in part, to our inability to measure rapidly the local concentration of this neurotransmitter. We used fast-scan cyclic voltammetry to infer serotonergic signaling from the striatum of 14 brains of human patients with Parkinson's disease. Here we report these novel measurements and show that they correlate with outcomes and decisions in a sequential investment game. We find that serotonergic concentrations transiently increase as a whole following negative reward prediction errors, while reversing when counterfactual losses predominate...
January 3, 2018: Neuropsychopharmacology: Official Publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29249811/increased-decision-thresholds-trigger-extended-information-gathering-across-the-compulsivity-spectrum
#19
Tobias U Hauser, Michael Moutoussis, Peter Dayan, Raymond J Dolan
Indecisiveness and doubt are cognitive phenotypes of compulsive disorders, including obsessive-compulsive disorder. Little is known regarding the cognitive mechanisms that drive these behaviours across a compulsivity spectrum. Here, we used a sequential information gathering task to study indecisiveness in subjects with high and low obsessive-compulsive scores. These subjects were selected from a large population-representative database, and matched for intellectual and psychiatric factors. We show that high compulsive subjects sampled more information and performed better when sampling was cost-free...
December 18, 2017: Translational Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29146619/urinary-neutrophil-gelatinase-associated-lipocalin-for-the-diagnosis-of-urinary-tract-infections
#20
Tamar R Lubell, Jonathan M Barasch, Katherine Xu, Maria Ieni, Keven I Cabrera, Peter S Dayan
OBJECTIVES: To determine the accuracy of the novel biomarker urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (uNGAL) to diagnose urinary tract infections (UTIs) in febrile infants and young children. METHODS: Prospective cross-sectional study of febrile infants <3 months ( ≥ 38.0°C) and children 3 to 24 months (≥ 39.0°C) evaluated for UTIs. uNGAL levels, urinalysis, Gram-stain and culture were obtained. UTI was defined by colony counts. RESULTS: Of 260 patients, 35 (13...
December 2017: Pediatrics
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