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Peter Dayan

Anupam B Kharbanda, Gabriela Vazquez-Benitez, Dustin W Ballard, David R Vinson, Uli K Chettipally, Mamata V Kene, Steven P Dehmer, Richard G Bachur, Peter S Dayan, Nathan Kuppermann, Patrick J O'Connor, Elyse O Kharbanda
OBJECTIVES: We sought to develop and validate a clinical calculator that can be used to quantify risk for appendicitis on a continuous scale for patients with acute abdominal pain. METHODS: The pediatric appendicitis risk calculator (pARC) was developed and validated through secondary analyses of 3 distinct cohorts. The derivation sample included visits to 9 pediatric emergency departments between March 2009 and April 2010. The validation sample included visits to a single pediatric emergency department from 2003 to 2004 and 2013 to 2015...
March 13, 2018: Pediatrics
Rosie Dew, Kathryn King, Onyebuchi E Okosieme, Simon H Pearce, Gemma Donovan, Peter N Taylor, Janis Hickey, Colin M Dayan, Graham Leese, Salman Razvi, Scott Wilkes
OBJECTIVE: To explore the attitudes and perceptions of health professionals towards management of hypothyroidism that contributes to the suboptimal treatment of hypothyroidism in general practice. DESIGN: A qualitative interview study using semistructured interviews. PARTICIPANTS: Sixteen participants were interviewed between March and August 2016 comprising nine general practitioners (GPs), four pharmacists, two practice nurses and one nurse practitioner...
February 21, 2018: BMJ Open
Andreas Hula, Iris Vilares, Terry Lohrenz, Peter Dayan, P Read Montague
Cooperation and competition between human players in repeated microeconomic games offer a window onto social phenomena such as the establishment, breakdown and repair of trust. However, although a suitable starting point for the quantitative analysis of such games exists, namely the Interactive Partially Observable Markov Decision Process (I-POMDP), computational considerations and structural limitations have limited its application, and left unmodelled critical features of behavior in a canonical trust task...
February 15, 2018: PLoS Computational Biology
Dorothea Hämmerer, Martina F Callaghan, Alexandra Hopkins, Julian Kosciessa, Matthew Betts, Arturo Cardenas-Blanco, Martin Kanowski, Nikolaus Weiskopf, Peter Dayan, Raymond J Dolan, Emrah Düzel
The locus coeruleus (LC) is the principal origin of noradrenaline in the brain. LC integrity varies considerably across healthy older individuals, and is suggested to contribute to altered cognitive functions in aging. Here we test this hypothesis using an incidental memory task that is known to be susceptible to noradrenergic modulation. We used MRI neuromelanin (NM) imaging to assess LC structural integrity and pupillometry as a putative index of LC activation in both younger and older adults. We show that older adults with reduced structural LC integrity show poorer subsequent memory...
February 12, 2018: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Anupam B Kharbanda, Eric W Christensen, Nanette C Dudley, Lalit Bajaj, Michelle D Stevenson, Charles G Macias, Manoj K Mittal, Richard G Bachur, Jonathan E Bennett, Kelly Sinclair, Brianna McMichael, Peter S Dayan
OBJECTIVE: The use of computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound (US) in patients with acute abdominal pain has substantial variation across pediatric emergency departments (ED). This study compares the cost of diagnosing and treating suspected appendicitis across a multi-center network of children's hospitals. METHODS: This study is a secondary analysis using de-identified data of a prospective, observational study of patients with suspected appendicitis at nine pediatric EDs...
February 10, 2018: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
Rathie Rajendram, Peter N Taylor, Victoria J Wilson, Nicola Harris, Olivia C Morris, Marjorie Tomlinson, Sue Yarrow, Helen Garrott, Helen M Herbert, Andrew D Dick, Anne Cook, Rao Gattamaneni, Rajni Jain, Jane Olver, Steven J Hurel, Fion Bremner, Suzannah R Drummond, Ewan Kemp, Diana M Ritchie, Nichola Rumsey, Daniel Morris, Carol Lane, Nachi Palaniappan, Chunhei Li, Julie Pell, Robert Hills, Daniel G Ezra, Mike J Potts, Sue Jackson, Geoffrey E Rose, Nicholas Plowman, Catey Bunce, Jimmy M Uddin, Richard W J Lee, Colin M Dayan
BACKGROUND: Standard treatment for thyroid eye disease is with systemic corticosteroids. We aimed to establish whether orbital radiotherapy or antiproliferative immunosuppression would confer any additional benefit. METHODS: CIRTED was a multicentre, double-blind, randomised controlled trial with a 2 × 2 factorial design done at six centres in the UK. Adults with active moderate-to-severe thyroid eye disease associated with proptosis or ocular motility restriction were recruited to the trial...
January 30, 2018: Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology
Charlotte Hales, Peter N Taylor, Sue Channon, Ruth Paradice, Kirsten McEwan, Lei Zhang, Michael Gyedu, Ameen Bakhsh, Onyebuchi Okosieme, Ilaria Muller, Mohd S Draman, John W Gregory, Colin Dayan, John H Lazarus, D Aled Rees, Marian Ludgate
Context & Objective: The Controlled Antenatal Thyroid Screening (CATS) study investigated treatment for suboptimal gestational thyroid function (SGTF) on childhood cognition and found no difference in IQ at 3 years between children of treated and untreated SGTF mothers. We have measured IQ in the same children at age 9.5-years and included children from normal-GTF mothers. Design, Setting & Participants: One examiner, blinded to participant group, assessed children's IQ (WISC-IV), long-term memory and motor function (NEPSY-II) from children of 119 treated and 98 untreated SGTF mothers plus children of 232 mothers with normal-GTF...
January 15, 2018: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Leah Tzimenatos, Prashant Mahajan, Peter S Dayan, Melissa Vitale, James G Linakis, Stephen Blumberg, Dominic Borgialli, Richard M Ruddy, John Van Buren, Octavio Ramilo, Nathan Kuppermann
OBJECTIVES: Reports of the test accuracy of the urinalysis for diagnosing urinary tract infections (UTIs) in young febrile infants have been variable. We evaluated the test characteristics of the urinalysis for diagnosing UTIs, with and without associated bacteremia, in young febrile infants. METHODS: We performed a planned secondary analysis of data from a prospective study of febrile infants ≤60 days old at 26 emergency departments in the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network...
January 16, 2018: Pediatrics
Kevin Lloyd, Peter Dayan
Ideal decision-makers should constantly assess all sources of information about opportunities and threats, and be able to redetermine their choices promptly in the face of change. However, perpetual monitoring and reassessment impose inordinate sensing and computational costs, making them impractical for animals and machines alike. The obvious alternative of committing for extended periods of time to limited sensory strategies associated with particular courses of action can be dangerous and wasteful. Here, we explore the intermediate possibility of making provisional temporal commitments whilst admitting interruption based on limited broader observation...
January 16, 2018: PLoS Computational Biology
Rosalyn J Moran, Kenneth T Kishida, Terry Lohrenz, Ignacio Saez, Adrian W Laxton, Mark R Witcher, Stephen B Tatter, Thomas L Ellis, Paul Em Phillips, Peter Dayan, P Read Montague
The role of serotonin in human brain function remains elusive due, at least in part, to our inability to measure rapidly the local concentration of this neurotransmitter. We used fast-scan cyclic voltammetry to infer serotonergic signaling from the striatum of fourteen brains of human patients with Parkinson's disease. Here we report these novel measurements and show that they correlate with outcomes and decisions in a sequential investment game. We find that serotonergic concentrations transiently increase as a whole following negative reward prediction errors, while reversing when counterfactual losses predominate...
January 3, 2018: Neuropsychopharmacology: Official Publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology
Tobias U Hauser, Michael Moutoussis, Peter Dayan, Raymond J Dolan
Indecisiveness and doubt are cognitive phenotypes of compulsive disorders, including obsessive-compulsive disorder. Little is known regarding the cognitive mechanisms that drive these behaviours across a compulsivity spectrum. Here, we used a sequential information gathering task to study indecisiveness in subjects with high and low obsessive-compulsive scores. These subjects were selected from a large population-representative database, and matched for intellectual and psychiatric factors. We show that high compulsive subjects sampled more information and performed better when sampling was cost-free...
December 18, 2017: Translational Psychiatry
Tamar R Lubell, Jonathan M Barasch, Katherine Xu, Maria Ieni, Keven I Cabrera, Peter S Dayan
OBJECTIVES: To determine the accuracy of the novel biomarker urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (uNGAL) to diagnose urinary tract infections (UTIs) in febrile infants and young children. METHODS: Prospective cross-sectional study of febrile infants <3 months ( ≥ 38.0°C) and children 3 to 24 months (≥ 39.0°C) evaluated for UTIs. uNGAL levels, urinalysis, Gram-stain and culture were obtained. UTI was defined by colony counts. RESULTS: Of 260 patients, 35 (13...
December 2017: Pediatrics
Daniel S Tsze, Carl L von Baeyer, Vartan Pahalyants, Peter S Dayan
STUDY OBJECTIVE: The Verbal Numerical Rating Scale is the most commonly used self-report measure of pain intensity. It is unclear how the validity and reliability of the scale scores vary across children's ages. We aimed to determine the validity and reliability of the scale for children presenting to the emergency department across a comprehensive spectrum of age. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study of children aged 4 to 17 years. Children self-reported their pain intensity, using the Verbal Numerical Rating Scale and Faces Pain Scale-Revised at 2 serial assessments...
October 26, 2017: Annals of Emergency Medicine
Leah R Goldberg, Catherine G Kernie, Kathleen Lillis, Jonathan Bennett, Gregory Conners, Charles G Macias, James Callahan, Cigdem Akman, W Allen Hauser, Nathan Kuppermann, Peter S Dayan
OBJECTIVES: The risk of early seizure recurrences after first unprovoked seizures in children is largely unknown. We aimed to determine the rate of seizure recurrence within 14 days of first unprovoked seizures in children and identify associated risk factors. Secondarily, we aimed to determine the risk of recurrence at 48 hours and 4 months. METHODS: We conducted a secondary analysis of a multicenter cohort study of children 29 days to 18 years with first unprovoked seizures...
November 4, 2017: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
Lauren S Chernick, Melissa S Stockwell, Mengfei Wu, Paula M Castaño, Rebecca Schnall, Carolyn L Westhoff, John Santelli, Peter S Dayan
PURPOSE: To evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of a text messaging intervention to increase contraception among adolescent emergency department patients. METHODS: A pilot randomized controlled trial of sexually active females aged 14-19 receiving 3 months of theory-based, unidirectional educational and motivational texts providing reproductive health information versus standardized discharge instructions. Blinded assessors measured contraception initiation via telephone follow-up and health record review at 3 months...
December 2017: Journal of Adolescent Health: Official Publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine
Tor Tarantola, Dharshan Kumaran, Peter Dayan, Benedetto De Martino
Our personal preferences affect a broad array of social behaviors. This includes the way we learn the preferences of others, an ability that often relies on limited or ambiguous information. Here we report an egocentric influence on this type of social learning that is reflected in both performance and response times. Using computational models that combine inter-trial learning and intra-trial choice, we find transient effects of participants' preferences on the learning process, through the influence of priors, and persistent effects on the choice process...
October 10, 2017: Nature Communications
Francesco Rigoli, Benjamin Chew, Peter Dayan, Raymond J Dolan
Substantial evidence indicates that subjective value is adapted to the statistics of reward expected within a given temporal context. However, how these contextual expectations are learned is poorly understood. To examine such learning, we exploited a recent observation that participants performing a gambling task adjust their preferences as a function of context. We show that, in the absence of contextual cues providing reward information, an average reward expectation was learned from recent past experience...
January 2018: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
Níall Lally, Quentin J M Huys, Neir Eshel, Paul Faulkner, Peter Dayan, Jonathan P Roiser
Important real-world decisions are often arduous as they frequently involve sequences of choices, with initial selections affecting future options. Evaluating every possible combination of choices is computationally intractable, particularly for longer multistep decisions. Therefore, humans frequently use heuristics to reduce the complexity of decisions. We recently used a goal-directed planning task to demonstrate the profound behavioral influence and ubiquity of one such shortcut, namely aversive pruning, a reflexive Pavlovian process that involves neglecting parts of the decision space residing beyond salient negative outcomes...
October 18, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
Ross E F Harper, Maite Ogueta, Peter Dayan, Ralf Stanewsky, Joerg T Albert
In Drosophila, as in other animals, the circadian clock is a singular entity in name and concept only. In reality, clock functions emerge from multiple processes and anatomical substrates. One distinction has conventionally been made between a central clock (in the brain) and peripheral clocks (e.g., in the gut and the eyes). Both types of clock generate robust circadian oscillations, which do not require external input. Furthermore, the phases of these oscillations remain exquisitely sensitive to specific environmental cues, such as the daily changes of light and temperature...
September 1, 2017: Journal of Biological Rhythms
Lieke de Boer, Jan Axelsson, Katrine Riklund, Lars Nyberg, Peter Dayan, Lars Bäckman, Marc Guitart-Masip
Probabilistic reward learning is characterised by individual differences that become acute in aging. This may be due to age-related dopamine (DA) decline affecting neural processing in striatum, prefrontal cortex, or both. We examined this by administering a probabilistic reward learning task to younger and older adults, and combining computational modelling of behaviour, fMRI and PET measurements of DA D1 availability. We found that anticipatory value signals in ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) were attenuated in older adults...
September 5, 2017: ELife
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