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Microbiome brain

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29776865/gut-microbiota-in-patients-with-parkinson-s-disease-in-southern-china
#1
Aiqun Lin, Wenxia Zheng, Yan He, Wenli Tang, Xiaobo Wei, Rongni He, Wei Huang, Yuying Su, Yaowei Huang, Hongwei Zhou, Huifang Xie
INTRODUCTION: Accumulating evidence has revealed alterations in the communication between the gut and brain in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), and previous studies have confirmed that alterations in the gut microbiome play an important role in the pathogenesis of numerous diseases, including PD. The aim of this study was to determine whether the faecal microbiome of PD patients in southern China differs from that of control subjects and whether the gut microbiome composition alters among different PD motor phenotypes...
May 16, 2018: Parkinsonism & related Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29763437/postnatal-colonization-with-human-infant-type-bifidobacterium-species-alters-behavior-of-adult-gnotobiotic-mice
#2
Berkley Luk, Surabi Veeraragavan, Melinda Engevik, Miriam Balderas, Angela Major, Jessica Runge, Ruth Ann Luna, James Versalovic
Accumulating studies have defined a role for the intestinal microbiota in modulation of host behavior. Research using gnotobiotic mice emphasizes that early microbial colonization with a complex microbiota (conventionalization) can rescue some of the behavioral abnormalities observed in mice that grow to adulthood completely devoid of bacteria (germ-free mice). However, the human infant and adult microbiomes vary greatly, and effects of the neonatal microbiome on neurodevelopment are currently not well understood...
2018: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29761610/pathways-and-mechanisms-linking-dietary-components-to-cardiometabolic-disease-thinking-beyond-calories
#3
REVIEW
K L Stanhope, M I Goran, A Bosy-Westphal, J C King, L A Schmidt, J-M Schwarz, E Stice, A C Sylvetsky, P J Turnbaugh, G A Bray, C D Gardner, P J Havel, V Malik, A E Mason, E Ravussin, M Rosenbaum, J A Welsh, C Allister-Price, D M Sigala, M R C Greenwood, A Astrup, R M Krauss
Calories from any food have the potential to increase risk for obesity and cardiometabolic disease because all calories can directly contribute to positive energy balance and fat gain. However, various dietary components or patterns may promote obesity and cardiometabolic disease by additional mechanisms that are not mediated solely by caloric content. Researchers explored this topic at the 2017 CrossFit Foundation Academic Conference 'Diet and Cardiometabolic Health - Beyond Calories', and this paper summarizes the presentations and follow-up discussions...
May 14, 2018: Obesity Reviews: An Official Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29751747/a-fatal-case-associated-with-respiratory-syncytial-virus-infection-in-a-young-child
#4
Lili Xu, Hengmiao Gao, Jiansheng Zeng, Jun Liu, Cong Lu, Xiaolei Guan, Suyun Qian, Zhengde Xie
BACKGROUND: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common viral cause of pediatric bronchiolitis and pneumonia worldwide. Risk factors for high mortality and prolonged morbidity after RSV infection include premature birth, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, congenital heart disease, and Down syndrome. However, some previously healthy, full-term children who are infected with RSV also require hospitalization and even experience severe sequelae or death. CASE PRESENTATION: In this report, we present the case of an RSV-associated death of a child who was born at full-term and developed normally up to the age of 2 years old...
May 11, 2018: BMC Infectious Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29748817/the-role-of-the-microbiome-for-human-health-from-basic-science-to-clinical-applications
#5
M Hasan Mohajeri, Robert J M Brummer, Robert A Rastall, Rinse K Weersma, Hermie J M Harmsen, Marijke Faas, Manfred Eggersdorfer
The 2017 annual symposium organized by the University Medical Center Groningen in The Netherlands focused on the role of the gut microbiome in human health and disease. Experts from academia and industry examined interactions of prebiotics, probiotics, or vitamins with the gut microbiome in health and disease, the development of the microbiome in early-life and the role of the microbiome on the gut-brain axis. The gut microbiota changes dramatically during pregnancy and intrinsic factors (such as stress), in addition to extrinsic factors (such as diet, and drugs) influence the composition and activity of the gut microbiome throughout life...
May 10, 2018: European Journal of Nutrition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29743478/transcriptome-analysis-in-whole-blood-reveals-increased-microbial-diversity-in-schizophrenia
#6
Loes M Olde Loohuis, Serghei Mangul, Anil P S Ori, Guillaume Jospin, David Koslicki, Harry Taegyun Yang, Timothy Wu, Marco P Boks, Catherine Lomen-Hoerth, Martina Wiedau-Pazos, Rita M Cantor, Willem M de Vos, René S Kahn, Eleazar Eskin, Roel A Ophoff
The role of the human microbiome in health and disease is increasingly appreciated. We studied the composition of microbial communities present in blood across 192 individuals, including healthy controls and patients with three disorders affecting the brain: schizophrenia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and bipolar disorder. By using high-quality unmapped RNA sequencing reads as candidate microbial reads, we performed profiling of microbial transcripts detected in whole blood. We were able to detect a wide range of bacterial and archaeal phyla in blood...
May 10, 2018: Translational Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29742478/autoimmune-phenotypes-in-schizophrenia-reveal-novel-treatment-targets
#7
REVIEW
Emily G Severance, Faith B Dickerson, Robert H Yolken
Typical and atypical antipsychotics are the first-line treatments for schizophrenia, but these classes of drugs are not universally effective, and they can have serious side effects that impact compliance. Antipsychotic drugs generally target the dopamine pathways with some variation. As research of schizophrenia pathophysiology has shifted away from a strictly dopamine-centric focus, the development of new pharmacotherapies has waned. A field of inquiry with centuries-old roots is gaining traction in psychiatric research circles and may represent a new frontier for drug discovery in schizophrenia...
May 6, 2018: Pharmacology & Therapeutics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29723105/probiotics-drive-gut-microbiome-triggering-emotional-brain-signatures
#8
Deepika Bagga, Johanna Louise Reichert, Karl Koschutnig, Christoph Stefan Aigner, Peter Holzer, Kaisa Koskinen, Christine Moissl Eichinger, Veronika Schöpf
Experimental manipulation of the gut microbiome was found to modify emotional and cognitive behavior, neurotransmitter expression and brain function in rodents, but corresponding human data remain scarce. The present double-blind, placebo-controlled randomised study aimed at investigating the effects of 4 weeks' probiotic administration on behavior, brain function and gut microbial composition in healthy volunteers. Forty-five healthy participants divided equally into three groups (probiotic, placebo and no intervention) underwent functional MRI (emotional decision-making and emotional recognition memory tasks)...
May 3, 2018: Gut Microbes
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29721973/the-role-of-microbiota-in-retinal-disease
#9
Sheldon Rowan, Allen Taylor
The ten years since the first publications on the human microbiome project have brought enormous attention and insight into the role of the human microbiome in health and disease. Connections between populations of microbiota and ocular disease are now being established, and increased accessibility to microbiome research and insights into other diseases is expected to yield enormous information in the coming years. With the characterization of the ocular microbiome, important insights have already been made regarding corneal and conjunctival tissues...
2018: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29705711/alcohol-microbiome-and-their-effect-on-psychiatric-disorders
#10
REVIEW
Thomas Hillemacher, Oliver Bachmann, Kai G Kahl, Helge Frieling
There is accumulating evidence that alcohol consumption and especially alcohol withdrawal increase brain levels of known innate immune signaling molecules and cause neuroinflammation. It has been shown that microbiota play a pivotal role in this process and affect central neurochemistry and behavior. Disruption of or alterations in the intimate cross-talk between microbiome and brain may be a significant factor in many psychiatric disorders. Alterations in the composition of the microbiome, so called dysbiosis, may result in detrimental distortion of microbe-host homeostasis modulating the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis...
April 26, 2018: Progress in Neuro-psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29703936/ketogenic-diet-enhances-neurovascular-function-with-altered-gut-microbiome-in-young-healthy-mice
#11
David Ma, Amy C Wang, Ishita Parikh, Stefan J Green, Jared D Hoffman, George Chlipala, M Paul Murphy, Brent S Sokola, Björn Bauer, Anika M S Hartz, Ai-Ling Lin
Neurovascular integrity, including cerebral blood flow (CBF) and blood-brain barrier (BBB) function, plays a major role in determining cognitive capability. Recent studies suggest that neurovascular integrity could be regulated by the gut microbiome. The purpose of the study was to identify if ketogenic diet (KD) intervention would alter gut microbiome and enhance neurovascular functions, and thus reduce risk for neurodegeneration in young healthy mice (12-14 weeks old). Here we show that with 16 weeks of KD, mice had significant increases in CBF and P-glycoprotein transports on BBB to facilitate clearance of amyloid-beta, a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD)...
April 27, 2018: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29701810/relationship-between-the-gut-microbiome-and-brain-function
#12
M Hasan Mohajeri, Giorgio La Fata, Robert E Steinert, Peter Weber
It has become increasingly evident in recent years that the gut microbiome and the brain communicate in a bidirectional manner, with each possibly affecting the other's functions. Substantial research has aimed to understand the mechanisms of this interaction and to outline strategies for preventing or treating nervous system-related disturbances. This review explores the evidence demonstrating how the gut microbiome may affect brain function in adults, thereby having an impact on stress, anxiety, depression, and cognition...
April 26, 2018: Nutrition Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29701156/diagnostic-issues-in-early-onset-obsessive-compulsive-disorder-and-their-treatment-implications
#13
Elisabetta Burchi, Stefano Pallanti
BACKGROUND: The lifespan approach and recent shift in the conceptualization of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) promoted by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fifth Edition (DSM5) along with novel insights into the pathogenesis of this heterogeneous disorder are driving the development of new outcome measures and new treatments for a disease that, on the other hand, is characterized by high rates of refractoriness. OBJECTIVE AND METHODS: The aim of this review is to provide a discussion of the translational evidence about Early Onset OCD (EO) in compliance with a neurodevelopmental and RdoC perspective...
April 26, 2018: Current Neuropharmacology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29697017/high-fat-diet-induces-depression-like-behaviour-in-mice-associated-with-changes-in-microbiome-neuropeptide-y-and-brain-metabolome
#14
Ahmed M Hassan, Giulia Mancano, Karl Kashofer, Esther E Fröhlich, Andrija Matak, Raphaela Mayerhofer, Florian Reichmann, Marta Olivares, Audrey M Neyrinck, Nathalie M Delzenne, Sandrine P Claus, Peter Holzer
OBJECTIVES: The biological mechanisms linking diet-related obesity and depression remain unclear. Therefore, we examined the impact of high-fat diet (HFD) on murine behaviour, intestinal microbiome, brain metabolome, neuropeptide Y (NPY) expression, and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) activity. METHODS: Male C57Bl/6J mice were fed an HFD (60 kJ% from fat) or control diet (12 kJ% from fat) for 8 weeks, followed by behavioural phenotyping. Caecal microbiome was analysed by 16S rDNA sequencing, brain metabolome by 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance, NPY expression by PCR and immunoassay, and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) activity by enzymatic assay...
April 26, 2018: Nutritional Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29693607/harnessing-the-power-of-microbiome-assessment-tools-as-part-of-neuroprotective-nutrition-and-lifestyle-medicine-interventions
#15
REVIEW
Miguel Toribio-Mateas
An extensive body of evidence documents the importance of the gut microbiome both in health and in a variety of human diseases. Cell and animal studies describing this relationship abound, whilst clinical studies exploring the associations between changes in gut microbiota and the corresponding metabolites with neurodegeneration in the human brain have only begun to emerge more recently. Further, the findings of such studies are often difficult to translate into simple clinical applications that result in measurable health outcomes...
April 25, 2018: Microorganisms
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29691482/why-does-the-microbiome-affect-behaviour
#16
REVIEW
Katerina V-A Johnson, Kevin R Foster
Growing evidence indicates that the mammalian microbiome can affect behaviour, and several symbionts even produce neurotransmitters. One common explanation for these observations is that symbionts have evolved to manipulate host behaviour for their benefit. Here, we evaluate the manipulation hypothesis by applying evolutionary theory to recent work on the gut-brain axis. Although the theory predicts manipulation by symbionts under certain conditions, these appear rarely satisfied by the genetically diverse communities of the mammalian microbiome...
April 24, 2018: Nature Reviews. Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29686603/indole-a-signaling-molecule-produced-by-the-gut-microbiota-negatively-impacts-emotional-behaviors-in-rats
#17
Mathilde Jaglin, Moez Rhimi, Catherine Philippe, Nicolas Pons, Aurélia Bruneau, Bénédicte Goustard, Valérie Daugé, Emmanuelle Maguin, Laurent Naudon, Sylvie Rabot
Gut microbiota produces a wide and diverse array of metabolites that are an integral part of the host metabolome. The emergence of the gut microbiome-brain axis concept has prompted investigations on the role of gut microbiota dysbioses in the pathophysiology of brain diseases. Specifically, the search for microbe-related metabolomic signatures in human patients and animal models of psychiatric disorders has pointed out the importance of the microbial metabolism of aromatic amino acids. Here, we investigated the effect of indole on brain and behavior in rats...
2018: Frontiers in Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29686534/the-neurodevelopmental-perspective-of-surgical-necrotizing-enterocolitis-the-role-of-the-gut-brain-axis
#18
REVIEW
Chariton Moschopoulos, Panagiotis Kratimenos, Ioannis Koutroulis, Bhairav V Shah, Anja Mowes, Vineet Bhandari
This state-of-the-art review article aims to highlight the most recent evidence about the therapeutic options of surgical necrotizing enterocolitis, focusing on the molecular basis of the gut-brain axis in relevance to the neurodevelopmental outcomes of primary peritoneal drainage and primary laparotomy. Current evidence favors primary laparotomy over primary peritoneal drainage as regards neurodevelopment in the surgical treatment of necrotizing enterocolitis. The added exposure to inhalational anesthesia in infants undergoing primary laparotomy is an additional confounding variable but requires further study...
2018: Mediators of Inflammation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29673577/profiling-of-g-protein-coupled-receptors-in-vagal-afferents-reveals-novel-gut-to-brain-sensing-mechanisms
#19
Kristoffer L Egerod, Natalia Petersen, Pascal N Timshel, Jens C Rekling, Yibing Wang, Qinghua Liu, Thue W Schwartz, Laurent Gautron
OBJECTIVES: G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) act as transmembrane molecular sensors of neurotransmitters, hormones, nutrients, and metabolites. Because unmyelinated vagal afferents richly innervate the gastrointestinal mucosa, gut-derived molecules may directly modulate the activity of vagal afferents through GPCRs. However, the types of GPCRs expressed in vagal afferents are largely unknown. Here, we determined the expression profile of all GPCRs expressed in vagal afferents of the mouse, with a special emphasis on those innervating the gastrointestinal tract...
April 3, 2018: Molecular Metabolism
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29673295/gut-microbiota-metabolism-and-psychopathology-a-critical-review-and-novel-perspectives
#20
Robin N Groen, Nicolien C de Clercq, Max Nieuwdorp, H J Rogier Hoenders, Albert K Groen
Psychiatric disorders are often associated with metabolic comorbidities. However, the mechanisms through which metabolic and psychiatric disorders are connected remain unclear. Pre-clinical studies in rodents indicate that the bidirectional signaling between the intestine and the brain, the so-called microbiome-gut-brain axis, plays an important role in the regulation of both metabolism and behavior. The gut microbiome produces a vast number of metabolites that may be transported into the host and play a part in homeostatic control of metabolism as well as brain function...
April 20, 2018: Critical Reviews in Clinical Laboratory Sciences
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