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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29341130/mitochondrial-function-and-autophagy-integrating-proteotoxic-redox-and-metabolic-stress-in-parkinson-s-disease
#1
REVIEW
Jianhua Zhang, M Lillian Culp, Jason G Craver, Victor Darley-Usmar
Parkinson's disease (PD) is a movement disorder with widespread neurodegeneration in the brain. Significant oxidative, reductive, metabolic, and proteotoxic alterations have been observed in PD postmortem brains. The alterations of mitochondrial function resulting in decreased bioenergetic health is important and needs to be further examined to help develop biomarkers for PD severity and prognosis. It is now becoming clear that multiple hits on metabolic and signaling pathways are likely to exacerbate PD pathogenesis...
January 17, 2018: Journal of Neurochemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29340928/microbiota-signaling-pathways-that-influence-neurologic-disease
#2
REVIEW
Laura M Cox, Howard L Weiner
Though seemingly distinct and autonomous, emerging evidence suggests there is a bidirectional interaction between the intestinal microbiota and the brain. This crosstalk may play a substantial role in neurologic diseases, including anxiety, depression, autism, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and, potentially, Alzheimer's disease. Long hypothesized by Metchnikoff and others well over 100 years ago, investigations into the mind-microbe axis is now seeing a rapid resurgence of research. If specific pathways and mechanisms of interaction are understood, it could have broad therapeutic potential, as the microbiome is environmentally acquired and can be modified to promote health...
January 16, 2018: Neurotherapeutics: the Journal of the American Society for Experimental NeuroTherapeutics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29338008/interactions-between-species-introduce-spurious-associations-in-microbiome-studies
#3
Rajita Menon, Vivek Ramanan, Kirill S Korolev
Microbiota contribute to many dimensions of host phenotype, including disease. To link specific microbes to specific phenotypes, microbiome-wide association studies compare microbial abundances between two groups of samples. Abundance differences, however, reflect not only direct associations with the phenotype, but also indirect effects due to microbial interactions. We found that microbial interactions could easily generate a large number of spurious associations that provide no mechanistic insight. Using techniques from statistical physics, we developed a method to remove indirect associations and applied it to the largest dataset on pediatric inflammatory bowel disease...
January 16, 2018: PLoS Computational Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29335694/the-seventh-biennial-berry-health-benefits-symposium
#4
EDITORIAL
Navindra P Seeram, Britt Burton-Freeman
Research advancing current scientific understanding of the health benefits of berries continues to increase. The Berry Health Benefits Symposium (BHBS) is a biennial meeting highlighting the most recent berry health benefits research from all over the world. Pismo Beach, California was the venue for the seventh biennial BHBS in 2017, and featured oral invited papers on heart health and healthy aging, gut/microbiome health, brain aging, inflammation, cancer prevention, berry special topics, technology and chemistry...
January 16, 2018: Food & Function
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29317592/gut-microbiome-populations-are-associated-with-structure-specific-changes-in-white-matter-architecture
#5
Irene M Ong, Jose G Gonzalez, Sean J McIlwain, Emily A Sawin, Andrew J Schoen, Nagesh Adluru, Andrew L Alexander, John-Paul J Yu
Altered gut microbiome populations are associated with a broad range of neurodevelopmental disorders including autism spectrum disorder and mood disorders. In animal models, modulation of gut microbiome populations via dietary manipulation influences brain function and behavior and has been shown to ameliorate behavioral symptoms. With striking differences in microbiome-driven behavior, we explored whether these behavioral changes are also accompanied by corresponding changes in neural tissue microstructure...
January 10, 2018: Translational Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29316320/human-microbiota-blood-group-antigens-and-disease
#6
REVIEW
D Rose Ewald, Susan C J Sumner
Far from being just "bugs in our guts," the microbiota interacts with the body in previously unimagined ways. Research into the genome and the microbiome has revealed that the human body and the microbiota have a long-established but only recently recognized symbiotic relationship; homeostatic balance between them regulates body function. That balance is fragile, easily disturbed, and plays a fundamental role in human health-our very survival depends on the healthy functioning of these microorganisms. Increasing rates of cardiovascular, autoimmune, and inflammatory diseases, as well as epidemics in obesity and diabetes in recent decades are believed to be explained, in part, by unintended effects on the microbiota from vaccinations, poor diets, environmental chemicals, indiscriminate antibiotic use, and "germophobia...
January 9, 2018: Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews. Systems Biology and Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29315562/hfe-genotype-restricts-the-response-to-paraquat-in-a-mouse-model-of-neurotoxicity
#7
Anne M Nixon, Mark D Meadowcroft, Elizabeth B Neely, Amanda M Snyder, Carson J Purnell, Justin Wright, Regina Lamendella, Wint Nandar, Xuemei Huang, James R Connor
Parkinson's disease (PD) is marked clinically by motor dysfunction and pathologically by dopaminergic cell loss in the substantia nigra (SN) and iron accumulation in the substantia nigra. The driver underlying iron accumulation is unknown and could be genetic or environmental. The HFE protein is critical for the regulation of cellular iron uptake. Mutations within this protein are associated with increased iron accumulation including in the brain. We have focused on the commonly occurring H63D variant of the HFE gene as a disease modifier in a number of neurodegenerative diseases...
January 8, 2018: Journal of Neurochemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29301380/the-gut-brain-axis-and-the-microbiome-clues-to-pathophysiology-and-opportunities-for-novel-management-strategies-in-irritable-bowel-syndrome-ibs
#8
REVIEW
Eamonn M M Quigley
Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common of all medical disorders worldwide and, while for some it represents no more than a nuisance, for others it imposes significant negative impacts on daily life and activities. IBS is a heterogeneous disorder and may well have a number of causes which may lie anywhere from the external environment to the contents of the gut lumen and from the enteric neuromuscular apparatus and the gut immune system to the central nervous system. Consequently, the paradigm of the gut-brain axis, which includes the participation of these various factors, has proven a useful model to assist clinicians and patients alike in understanding the genesis of symptoms in IBS...
January 3, 2018: Journal of Clinical Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29290328/human-intestinal-microbiota-interaction-between-parasites-and-the-host-immune-response
#9
REVIEW
Oswaldo Partida-Rodríguez, Angélica Serrano-Vázquez, Miriam E Nieves-Ramírez, Patricia Moran, Liliana Rojas, Tobias Portillo, Enrique González, Eric Hernández, B Brett Finlay, Cecilia Ximenez
The human gut is a highly complex ecosystem with an extensive microbial community, and the influence of the intestinal microbiota reaches the entire host organism. For example, the microbiome regulates fat storage, stimulates or renews epithelial cells, and influences the development and maturation of the brain and the immune system. Intestinal microbes can protect against infection by pathogenic bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites. Hence, the maintenance of homeostasis between the gut microbiota and the rest of the body is crucial for health, with dysbiosis affecting disease...
December 28, 2017: Archives of Medical Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29282673/the-microbiome-gut-behavior-axis-crosstalk-between-the-gut-microbiome-and-oligodendrocytes-modulates-behavioral-responses
#10
REVIEW
Achilles Ntranos, Patrizia Casaccia
Environmental and dietary stimuli have always been implicated in brain development and behavioral responses. The gut, being the major portal of communication with the external environment, has recently been brought to the forefront of this interaction with the establishment of a gut-brain axis in health and disease. Moreover, recent breakthroughs in germ-free and antibiotic-treated mice have demonstrated the significant impact of the microbiome in modulating behavioral responses in mice and have established a more specific microbiome-gut-behavior axis...
December 27, 2017: Neurotherapeutics: the Journal of the American Society for Experimental NeuroTherapeutics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29277311/targeting-gut-microbiome-a-novel-and-potential-therapy-for-autism
#11
REVIEW
Yongshou Yang, Jinhu Tian, Bo Yang
Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a severely neurodevelopmental disorder that impairs a child's ability to communicate and interact with others. Children with neurodevelopmental disorder, including ASD, are regularly affected by gastrointestinal problems and dysbiosis of gut microbiota. On the other hand, humans live in a co-evolutionary association with plenty of microorganisms that resident on the exposed and internal surfaces of our bodies. The microbiome, refers to the collection of microbes and their genetic material, confers a variety of physiologic benefits to the host in many key aspects of life as well as being responsible for some diseases...
December 22, 2017: Life Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29276734/stress-the-gut-brain-axis-regulation-by-the-microbiome
#12
REVIEW
Jane A Foster, Linda Rinaman, John F Cryan
The importance of the gut-brain axis in regulating stress-related responses has long been appreciated. More recently, the microbiota has emerged as a key player in the control of this axis, especially during conditions of stress provoked by real or perceived homeostatic challenge. Diet is one of the most important modifying factors of the microbiota-gut-brain axis. The routes of communication between the microbiota and brain are slowly being unravelled, and include the vagus nerve, gut hormone signaling, the immune system, tryptophan metabolism, and microbial metabolites such as short chain fatty acids...
December 2017: Neurobiology of Stress
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29275859/microbiome-influences-prenatal-and-adult-microglia-in-a-sex-specific-manner
#13
Morgane Sonia Thion, Donovan Low, Aymeric Silvin, Jinmiao Chen, Pauline Grisel, Jonas Schulte-Schrepping, Ronnie Blecher, Thomas Ulas, Paola Squarzoni, Guillaume Hoeffel, Fanny Coulpier, Eleni Siopi, Friederike Sophie David, Claus Scholz, Foo Shihui, Josephine Lum, Arlaine Anne Amoyo, Anis Larbi, Michael Poidinger, Anne Buttgereit, Pierre-Marie Lledo, Melanie Greter, Jerry Kok Yen Chan, Ido Amit, Marc Beyer, Joachim Ludwig Schultze, Andreas Schlitzer, Sven Pettersson, Florent Ginhoux, Sonia Garel
Microglia are embryonically seeded macrophages that contribute to brain development, homeostasis, and pathologies. It is thus essential to decipher how microglial properties are temporally regulated by intrinsic and extrinsic factors, such as sexual identity and the microbiome. Here, we found that microglia undergo differentiation phases, discernable by transcriptomic signatures and chromatin accessibility landscapes, which can diverge in adult males and females. Remarkably, the absence of microbiome in germ-free mice had a time and sexually dimorphic impact both prenatally and postnatally: microglia were more profoundly perturbed in male embryos and female adults...
December 21, 2017: Cell
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29249963/exploring-the-association-between-alzheimer-s-disease-oral-health-microbial-endocrinology-and-nutrition
#14
REVIEW
Alice Harding, Ulrike Gonder, Sarita J Robinson, StJohn Crean, Sim K Singhrao
Longitudinal monitoring of patients suggests a causal link between chronic periodontitis and the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the explanation of how periodontitis can lead to dementia remains unclear. A working hypothesis links extrinsic inflammation as a secondary cause of AD. This hypothesis suggests a compromised oral hygiene leads to a dysbiotic oral microbiome whereby Porphyromonas gingivalis, a keystone periodontal pathogen, with its companion species, orchestrates immune subversion in the host...
2017: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29249928/the-antioxidant-cofactor-alpha-lipoic-acid-may-control-endogenous-formaldehyde-metabolism-in-mammals
#15
Anastasia V Shindyapina, Tatiana V Komarova, Ekaterina V Sheshukova, Natalia M Ershova, Vadim N Tashlitsky, Alexander V Kurkin, Ildar R Yusupov, Garik V Mkrtchyan, Murat Y Shagidulin, Yuri L Dorokhov
The healthy human body contains small amounts of metabolic formaldehyde (FA) that mainly results from methanol oxidation by pectin methylesterase, which is active in a vegetable diet and in the gastrointestinal microbiome. With age, the ability to maintain a low level of FA decreases, which increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease and dementia. It has been shown that 1,2-dithiolane-3-pentanoic acid or alpha lipoic acid (ALA), a naturally occurring dithiol and antioxidant cofactor of mitochondrial α-ketoacid dehydrogenases, increases glutathione (GSH) content and FA metabolism by mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) thus manifests a therapeutic potential beyond its antioxidant property...
2017: Frontiers in Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29237568/radiomicrobiomics-advancing-along-the-gut-brain-axis-through-big-data-analysis
#16
Silvia De Santis, David Moratal, Santiago Canals
The gut-brain axis communicates the brain with the gut microbiota, a bidirectional conduit that has received increasing attention in recent years thanks to its emerging role in brain development and function. Alterations in microbiota composition have been associated to neurological and psychiatric disorders, and several studies suggest that the immune system plays a fundamental role in the gut-brain interaction. Recent advances in brain imaging and in microbiome sequencing have generated a large amount of information, yet the data from both these sources need to be combined efficiently to extract biological meaning, and any diagnostic and/or prognostic benefit from these tools...
December 10, 2017: Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29220570/neuromicrobiology-how-microbes-influence-the-brain
#17
Cesar de la Fuente-Nunez, Beatriz Torres Meneguetti, Octávio Luiz Franco, Timothy K Lu
We review here recent discoveries in the exciting new field of neuromicrobiology. This field encompasses the interactions between the microbiome and the central nervous system. The microbiome has a tremendous impact on human health. In particular, the gut microbiota may play a key role in many essential processes in health and disease via the activity of the gut-brain axis, possibly contributing to autism spectrum disorders, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, depression, and anxiety disorder. Gut microbes may also be involved in nociception, complex host behaviors, and brain development...
December 28, 2017: ACS Chemical Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29186317/computational-profiling-of-the-gut-brain-axis-microflora-dysbiosis-insights-to-neurological-disorders
#18
Nikolas Dovrolis, George Kolios, George M Spyrou, Ioanna Maroulakou
Almost 2500 years after Hippocrates' observations on health and its direct association to the gastrointestinal tract, a paradigm shift has recently occurred, making the gut and its symbionts (bacteria, fungi, archaea and viruses) a point of convergence for studies. It is nowadays well established that the gut microflora's compositional diversity regulates via its genes (the microbiome) the host's health and provides preliminary insights into disease progression and regulation. The microbiome's involvement is evident in immunological and physiological studies that link changes in its biodiversity to its contributions to the host's phenotype but also in neurological investigations, substantiating the aptly named gut-brain axis...
November 27, 2017: Briefings in Bioinformatics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29173525/the-brain-gut-axis-and-stress-in-inflammatory-bowel-disease
#19
REVIEW
Charles N Bernstein
The brain-gut axis serves as a circuit that incorporates the human experience, the state of mind, the gut microbiome, and the immune response that ultimately drives the phenotypic expression of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). There are several biological pathways through which stress can play a deleterious role, including through increasing intestinal permeability, which can facilitate intestinal translocation of bacteria. Stress has an impact on symptoms in IBD; however, there is limited evidence that stress triggers increased intestinal inflammation...
December 2017: Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29169241/gut-reactions-how-the-blood-brain-barrier-connects-the-microbiome-and-the-brain
#20
Aric F Logsdon, Michelle A Erickson, Elizabeth M Rhea, Therese S Salameh, William A Banks
A growing body of evidence indicates that the microbiome interacts with the central nervous system (CNS) and can regulate many of its functions. One mechanism for this interaction is at the level of the blood-brain barriers (BBBs). In this minireview, we examine the several ways the microbiome is known to interact with the CNS barriers. Bacteria can directly release factors into the systemic circulation or can translocate into blood. Once in the blood, the microbiome and its factors can alter peripheral immune cells to promote interactions with the BBB and ultimately with other elements of the neurovascular unit...
January 1, 2017: Experimental Biology and Medicine
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