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Aaron J Done, Tinna Traustadóttir
The primary aim of this review is to summarize the current literature on the effects of acute exercise and regular exercise on nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) activity and downstream targets of Nrf2 signaling. Nrf2 (encoded in humans by the NFE2L2 gene) is the master regulator of antioxidant defenses, a transcription factor that regulates expression of more than 200 cytoprotective genes. Increasing evidence indicates that Nrf2 signaling plays a key role in how oxidative stress mediates the beneficial effects of exercise...
October 14, 2016: Redox Biology
Taewoong Oh, Sakura Tanaka, Tatsuki Naka, Shoji Igawa
PURPOSE: This study was performed to assess the effects of high-intensity intermittent swimming training(HIT) on bone in ovariectomized rats. METHODS: Six-week-old female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to either sham operation or bilateral ovariectomy. After surgery, they were divided into the following four groups: 1) sham-operated sedentary (S), 2) sham-operated exercise training (SE), 3) OVX sedentary (O), 4) OVX exercise training (OE) 5) OVX given 17β-estradiol (OE2) and 6) OVX exercise training and given 17β-estradiol (OEE)...
September 2016: Journal of Exercise Nutrition & Biochemistry
Andrew M Murray, Thomas W Jones, Cosmin Horobeanu, Anthony P Turner, John Sproule
BACKGROUND: Physiotherapists and other practitioners commonly prescribe foam rolling as an intervention, but the mechanistic effects of this intervention are not known. PURPOSE: The aim of this investigation was to establish if a single bout of foam rolling affects flexibility, skeletal muscle contractility and reflected temperature. METHODS: Twelve adolescent male squash players were evaluated on two separate occasions (treatment and control visits) and were tested on both legs for flexibility of the hip flexors and quadriceps, muscle contractility (as measured by tensiomyography) and temperature of the quadriceps (assessed via thermography) at repeated time points pre- and post a 60s rolling intervention (pre-, immediately post, 5, 10, 15, and 30 minutes post)...
October 2016: International Journal of Sports Physical Therapy
Kristine Coleman, Nicola D Robertson, Gregory A Dissen, Martha D Neuringer, L Drew Martin, Verginia C Cuzon Carlson, Christopher Kroenke, Damien Fair, Ansgar M Brambrink
BACKGROUND: Experimental evidence correlates anesthetic exposure during early development with neuronal and glial injury and death, as well as behavioral and cognitive impairments, in young animals. Several, although not all, retrospective human studies of neurocognitive and behavioral disorders after childhood exposure to anesthesia suggest a similar association. Few studies have specifically investigated the effects of infant anesthesia exposure on subsequent neurobehavioral development...
October 5, 2016: Anesthesiology
Martin J MacInnis, Martin J Gibala
Interval exercise typically involves repeated bouts of relatively intense exercise interspersed by short periods of recovery. A common classification scheme subdivides this method into high-intensity interval training (HIIT; 'near maximal' efforts) and sprint interval training (SIT; 'supramaximal' efforts). Both forms of interval training induce the classic physiological adaptations characteristic of moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) such as increased aerobic capacity (VO2max ) and mitochondrial content...
October 17, 2016: Journal of Physiology
Francesco Giallauria, Neil Andrew Smart, Antonio Cittadini, Carlo Vigorito
Exercise training (ET) is strongly recommended in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Moderate-intensity aerobic continuous ET is the best established training modality in CHF patients. In the last decade, however, high-intensity interval exercise training (HIIT) has aroused considerable interest in cardiac rehabilitation community. Basically, HIIT consists of repeated bouts of high-intensity exercise alternated with recovery periods. In CHF patients, HIIT exerts larger improvements in exercise capacity compared to moderate-continuous ET...
October 14, 2016: Monaldi Archives for Chest Disease, Archivio Monaldi Per le Malattie del Torace
Panagiotis Pappas, Giorgos Dallas, Giorgos Paradisis
In research, the accurate and reliable measurement of leg and vertical stiffness could contribute to valid interpretations. The current study aimed at determining the intra-participant variability (i.e. intra-day and inter-day reliabilities) of leg and vertical stiffness, as well as related parameters, during high speed treadmill running, using the "sine-wave" method. Thirty-one males ran on a treadmill at 6.67 m∙s(-1), and the contact and flight times were measured. To determine the intra-day reliability three 10-s running bouts with 10-min recovery were performed...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Applied Biomechanics
Yoshiaki Takahashi, Toshiharu Matsuura, Yusuke Yanagi, Koichiro Yoshimaru, Tomoaki Taguchi
BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: There is currently no unified view regarding whether liver transplantation or splenectomy should be performed for hypersplenism before liver transplantation in biliary atresia (BA) patients. We herein describe the efficacy of splenectomy before liver transplantation. METHODS: Splenectomy was performed in ten patients with hypersplenism associated with BA. We retrospectively reviewed their perioperative and postoperative courses, the number of leukocytes and thrombocytes, and the MELD score...
September 26, 2016: Journal of Pediatric Surgery
T S Nobre, R V Groehs, L F Azevedo, L M Antunes-Correa, D G Martinez, M J N N Alves, C E Negrao
It remains unknown whether or not a reduction in muscle sympathetic nerve activity in heart failure patients is associated over time with the effects of long- or short-term repeated exercise. 10 chronic heart failure patients, age 49±3 years old, functional class I-III NYHA, ejection fraction <40% were randomly submitted to either an acute bout of moderate continuous exercise OR high-intensity interval exercise. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (microneurography) and forearm blood flow (venous occlusion plethysmography) were evaluated pre- and post-exercise sessions...
September 27, 2016: International Journal of Sports Medicine
Antony P McNamee, Geoff D Tansley, Surendran Sabapathy, Michael J Simmonds
INTRODUCTION: Despite current generation mechanical assist devices being designed to limit shear stresses and minimise damage to formed elements in blood, severe secondary complications suggestive of impaired rheological functioning are still observed. At present, the precise interactions between the magnitude-duration of shear stress exposure and the deformability of red blood cells (RBC) remain largely undescribed for repeated subhaemolytic shear stress duty-cycles of less than 15 s...
September 20, 2016: Biorheology
Hui C Choo, Kazunori Nosaka, Jeremiah J Peiffer, Mohammed Ihsan, Chow C Yeo, Chris R Abbiss
This study examined the test-retest reliability of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) and Doppler ultrasound to assess exercise-induced haemodynamics. Nine men completed two identical trials consisting of 25-min submaximal cycling at first ventilatory threshold followed by repeated 30-s bouts of high-intensity (90% of peak power) cycling in 32.8 ± 0.4°C and 32 ± 5% relative humidity (RH). NIRS (tissue oxygenation index [TOI] and total haemoglobin [tHb]) and LDF (perfusion units [PU]) signals were monitored continuously during exercise, and leg blood flow was assessed by Doppler ultrasound at baseline and after exercise...
September 21, 2016: Journal of Sports Sciences
Yael Netz, Mona Abu-Rukun, Sharon Tsuk, Tzvi Dwolatzky, Raffi Carasso, Oron Levin, Ayelet Dunsky
Acute exercise appears to facilitate certain aspects of cognitive processing. The possibility that exercise may lead to more efficient inhibitory processes is of particular interest, owing to the wide range of cognitive and motor functions that inhibition may underlie. The purpose of the present study was to examine the immediate and the delayed effect of acute aerobic exercise on response inhibition, motor planning, and eye-hand coordination in healthy active adults. Forty healthy and active participants (10 females) with a mean age of 51...
September 16, 2016: Brain and Cognition
Albertas Skurvydas, Gediminas Mamkus, Sigitas Kamandulis, Vilma Dudoniene, Dovile Valanciene, Håkan Westerblad
PURPOSE: Force production frequently remains depressed for several hours or even days after various types of strenuous physical exercise. We hypothesized that the pattern of force changes during the first hour after exercise can be used to reveal muscular mechanisms likely to underlie the decline in muscle performance during exercise as well as factors involved in the triggering the prolonged force depression after exercise. METHODS: Nine groups of recreationally active male volunteers performed one of the following types of exercise: single prolonged or repeated short maximum voluntary contractions (MVCs); single or repeated all-out cycling bouts; repeated drop jumps...
September 16, 2016: European Journal of Applied Physiology
Jonathan M Oliver, Anthony L Almada, Leighsa E Van Eck, Meena Shah, Joel B Mitchell, Margaret T Jones, Andrew R Jagim, David S Rowlands
Athletes in sports demanding repeat maximal work outputs frequently train concurrently utilizing sequential bouts of intense endurance and resistance training sessions. On a daily basis, maximal work within subsequent bouts may be limited by muscle glycogen availability. Recently, the ingestion of a unique high molecular weight (HMW) carbohydrate was found to increase glycogen re-synthesis rate and enhance work output during subsequent endurance exercise, relative to low molecular weight (LMW) carbohydrate ingestion...
2016: PloS One
Richard M Pulsford, James Blackwell, Melvyn Hillsdon, Katarina Kos
OBJECTIVES: Interrupting prolonged periods of sitting may improve postprandial insulin and glucose although it is unclear whether interruptions need to involve physical activity or simply a change in posture (from sitting to standing) to benefit adults without metabolic impairment. This study examined effects of interrupting sitting with intermittent walking, and intermittent standing on dynamic insulin and glucose responses in men without known metabolic impairment. DESIGN: A randomised three-arm, cross-over experimental study comprising three seven-hour days of sustained sitting...
August 27, 2016: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport
Yuri Hosokawa, William M Adams, Douglas J Casa
CONTEXT: It is unknown how valid esophageal, rectal, and gastrointestinal temperatures (TES, TRE, and TGI) compare after exercise-induced hyperthermia in various hydration states. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to examine the differences between TES, TRE, and TGI during passive rest following exercise-induced hyperthermia under two different hydration states: euhydrated (EU) and hypohydrated (HY). DESIGN: Randomized-crossover design...
August 24, 2016: Journal of Sport Rehabilitation
Lisa Chinn, Kimberly S Peer, Lauren Miller
CONTEXT: Muscle fatigue and acute muscle soreness occur following exercise. Application of a local vibration intervention may be a modality to reduce the consequences of fatigue and soreness. OBJECTIVE: To examine the effects of a local vibration intervention following a bout of exercise on balance, power, and self-reported pain. DESIGN: Single-blind, crossover study. SETTING: Laboratory. PARTICIPANTS: Nineteen healthy, moderately active subjects completed the study...
August 24, 2016: Journal of Sport Rehabilitation
Ned Brophy-Williams, Matthew W Driller, Cecilia M Kitic, James W Fell, Shona L Halson
PURPOSE: To determine the effect of wearing compression socks between repeated running bouts on perceptual, physiological and performance-based parameters. METHODS: Twelve well-trained male runners (mean ± SD; 5km time 19:24 ± 1:19 mm:ss) recorded their perceptions on the efficacy of compression socks for recovery prior to completion of two experimental sessions. Each session consisted of two 5km running time trials (TT1 and TT2) on a treadmill, with a one-hour recovery period between each TT...
September 15, 2016: International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
Wonder Passoni Higino, Renato Aparecido de Souza, Fabio de Sousa Cavalcanti, Anderlei Dos Santos Cardoso, Murilo Victor Vasconcelos, Fabiano Fernandes da Silva, José Alexandre C A Leme
[Purpose] It is believed that eccentric high-intensity exercise can decrease performance in subsequent exercise. However, with repetition, the deleterious effects can be minimized. Thus, this study evaluated the influence of repeated bouts of eccentric exercise on subsequent high-intensity aerobic performance. [Subjects and Methods] Seven healthy and sedentary male volunteers were recruited. a) Visit 1: determination of maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max) and speed associated with maximum oxygen uptake (vVO2max) in incremental treadmill testing; b) Visit 2: run to exhaustion at vVO2max (Tlim control); c) Visit 3: 10 sets of 10 depth jumps, followed by a run to exhaustion at vVO2max (Tlim 1); d) Visit 4: after 6 weeks without any physical training, the volunteers carried out the same procedures as on the third visit (Tlim 2)...
August 2016: Journal of Physical Therapy Science
Jane M Black, Eric J Stöhr, Keeron Stone, Christopher J A Pugh, Mike Stembridge, Rob Shave, Joseph I Esformes
Arterial wall mechanics likely play an integral role in arterial responses to acute physiological stress. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the impact of low and moderate intensity double-leg press exercise on common carotid artery (CCA) wall mechanics using 2D vascular strain imaging. Short-axis CCA ultrasound images were collected in 15 healthy men (age: 21 ± 3 years; stature: 176.5 ± 6.2 cm; body mass; 80.6 ± 15.3 kg) before, during, and immediately after short-duration isometric double-leg press exercise at 30% and 60% of participants' one-repetition maximum (1RM: 317 ± 72 kg)...
September 2016: Physiological Reports
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