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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29691110/what-you-see-is-how-you-communicate-medical-students-meaning-making-of-a-patient-s-vignette
#1
Orit Karnieli-Miller, Keren Michael, Shmuel Eidelman, Dafna Meitar
OBJECTIVES: To examine how medical students notice issues in a vignette and construct their meaning, and how this construction influences their plan to communicate with the patient. METHODS: Following a breaking bad news course for 112 senior medical students, we qualitatively analyzed the participants' written descriptions of the issues they noticed as requiring special attention, using an Immersion/Crystallization iterative consensus process. RESULTS: Different students noticed different issues, but no-one noticed all 19 planted issues (Mean of issues noticed by students = 6...
April 10, 2018: Patient Education and Counseling
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29672937/see-reflect-learn-more-qualitative-analysis-of-breaking-bad-news-reflective-narratives
#2
Orit Karnieli-Miller, Michal Palombo, Dafna Meitar
CONTEXT: Breaking bad news (BBN) is a challenge that requires multiple professional competencies. BBN teaching often includes didactic and group role-playing sessions. Both are useful and important, but exclude another critical component of students' learning: day-to-day role-model observation in the clinics. Given the importance of observation and the potential benefit of reflective writing in teaching, we have incorporated reflective writing into our BBN course. The aim of this study was to enhance our understanding of the learning potential in reflective writing about BBN encounters and the ability to identify components that inhibit this learning...
May 2018: Medical Education
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29558944/intelligent-judgements-over-health-risks-in-a-spatial-agent-based-model
#3
Shaheen A Abdulkareem, Ellen-Wien Augustijn, Yaseen T Mustafa, Tatiana Filatova
BACKGROUND: Millions of people worldwide are exposed to deadly infectious diseases on a regular basis. Breaking news of the Zika outbreak for instance, made it to the main media titles internationally. Perceiving disease risks motivate people to adapt their behavior toward a safer and more protective lifestyle. Computational science is instrumental in exploring patterns of disease spread emerging from many individual decisions and interactions among agents and their environment by means of agent-based models...
March 20, 2018: International Journal of Health Geographics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29536795/actrims-2018-late-breaking-news-posters
#4
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2018: Multiple Sclerosis: Clinical and Laboratory Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29517872/-a-virtual-patient-to-improve-doctor-patient-communication-reality-or-fiction
#5
I Bragard, M Guillaume, A Ghuysen, J C Servotte, I Ortiz, B Pétré
The transformations of the health system and the preferences of the patients themselves have led healthcare professionals to rethink the place and role of the patient in the healthcare system, putting the caregivercare relationship and communication at the heart of public health issues. The literature shows that empathic communication is associated with better adherence to treatment, better patient satisfaction and less litigation. However, the initial training programs of health professionals are little oriented towards this field...
February 2018: Revue Médicale de Liège
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29501215/the-learning-effects-of-different-presentations-of-worked-examples-on-medical-students-breaking-bad-news-skills-a-randomized-and-blinded-field-trial
#6
Felix Michael Schmitz, Kai Philipp Schnabel, Daniel Bauer, Cadja Bachmann, Ulrich Woermann, Sissel Guttormsen
OBJECTIVES: Effective instructional approaches are needed to enable undergraduates to optimally prepare for the limited training time they receive with simulated patients (SPs). This study examines the learning effects of different presentation formats of a worked example on student SP communication. METHODS: Sixty-seven fourth-year medical students attending a mandatory communication course participated in this randomized field trial. Prior to the course, they worked through an e-learning module that introduced the SPIKES protocol for delivering bad news to patients...
February 24, 2018: Patient Education and Counseling
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29490528/persistent-influence-of-a-narrative-educational-program-on-physician-attitudes-regarding-patient-care
#7
Jennifer N Stojan, Eleanor Y Sun, Arno K Kumagai
PURPOSE: Educational approaches involving patient stories aim at enhancing empathy and patient-centered care; however, it is not known whether the influence of such programs on physician attitudes persists beyond medical school. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The Family Centered Experience (FCE) paired preclinical medical students with patient families over two years and engaged students in reflective dialogs about the volunteers' stories. This study examined possible long-term influences on attitudes toward medicine and doctoring...
February 28, 2018: Medical Teacher
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29468497/effectiveness-of-integrating-simulation-with-art-based-teaching-strategies-on-oncology-fellows-performance-regarding-breaking-bad-news
#8
Afsaneh Yakhforoshha, Seyed Amir Hossein Emami, Farhad Shahi, Saeed Shahsavari, Mohammadali Cheraghi, Rita Mojtahedzadeh, Behrooz Mahmoodi-Bakhtiari, Mandana Shirazi
The task of breaking bad news (BBN) may be improved by incorporating simulation with art-based teaching methods. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of an integrating simulation with art-based teaching strategies, on fellows' performance regarding BBN, in Iran. The study was carried out using quasi-experimental methods, interrupted time series. The participants were selected from medical oncology fellows at two teaching hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Iran. Participants were trained through workshop, followed by engaging participants with different types of art-based teaching methods...
February 21, 2018: Journal of Cancer Education: the Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Education
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29440814/effectiveness-of-the-certificate-course-in-essentials-of-palliative-care-program-on-the-knowledge-in-palliative-care-among-the-participants-a-cross-sectional-interventional-study
#9
Sushma Bhatnagar, Anuradha Patel
Background: Palliative medicine is an upcoming new specialty aimed at relieving suffering, improving quality of life and comfort care. There are many challenges and barriers in providing palliative care to our patients. The major challenge is lack of knowledge, attitude and skills among health-care providers. Objectives: Evaluate the effectiveness of the certificate course in essentials of palliative care (CCEPC) program on the knowledge in palliative care among the participants...
January 2018: Indian Journal of Palliative Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29399734/oncologists-and-breaking-bad-news-from-the-informed-patients-point-of-view-the-evaluation-of-the-spikes-protocol-implementation
#10
Paweł Marschollek, Katarzyna Bąkowska, Wojciech Bąkowski, Karol Marschollek, Radosław Tarkowski
The way that bad news is disclosed to a cancer patient has a crucial impact on physician-patient cooperation and trust. Consensus-based guidelines provide widely accepted tools for disclosing unfavorable information. In oncology, the most popular one is called the SPIKES protocol. A 17-question survey was administered to a group of 226 patients with cancer (mean age 59.6 years) in order to determine a level of SPIKES implementation during first cancer disclosure. In our assessment, the patients felt that the highest compliance with the SPIKES protocol was with Setting up (70...
February 5, 2018: Journal of Cancer Education: the Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Education
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29380222/cross-cultural-medical-care-training-and-education-a-national-survey-of-pediatric-hematology-oncology-fellows-in-training-and-fellowship-program-directors
#11
Amulya A Nageswara Rao, Deepti M Warad, Amy L Weaver, Cathy D Schleck, Vilmarie Rodriguez
Pediatric hematologists/oncologists face complex situations such as breaking bad news, treatment/clinical trials discussions, and end-of-life/hospice care. With increasing diversity in patient and physician populations, cultural competency and sensitivity training covering different aspects of pediatric hematology/oncology (PDHO) care can help improve health care delivery and reduce disparities. Though it is considered a required component of fellowship training, there is no clearly defined curriculum meant specifically for PDHO fellows-in-training (PDHO-F)...
January 27, 2018: Journal of Cancer Education: the Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Education
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29361953/breaking-bad-news-to-antenatal-patients-with-strategies-to-lessen-the-pain-a-qualitative-study
#12
José Atienza-Carrasco, Manuel Linares-Abad, María Padilla-Ruiz, Isabel María Morales-Gil
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 23, 2018: Reproductive Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29342495/improving-perinatology-residents-skills-in-breaking-bad-news-a-randomized-intervention-study
#13
Maria Silvia Vellutini Setubal, Maria Ângela Reis Goes Monteiro Antonio, Eliana Martorano Amaral, John Boulet
OBJECTIVE:  Breaking bad news (BBN) is particularly difficult in perinatology. Previous research has shown that BBN skills can be learned and improved when taught and practiced. This project evaluated whether a structured training session would enhance perinatology residents' skills in BBN. METHODS:  This was a randomized controlled intervention study with year 1 to 4 Perinatology residents from a medical school in Brazil, during the 2014/15 school year. A total of 61 out of 100 (61%) eligible residents volunteered to a structured training program involving communicating a perinatal loss to a simulated patient (SP) portraying the mother followed by the SP's immediate feedback, both video recorded...
January 17, 2018: Revista Brasileira de Ginecologia e Obstetrícia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29305342/social-media-impact-of-the-food-and-drug-administration-s-drug-safety-communication-messaging-about-zolpidem-mixed-methods-analysis
#14
Michael S Sinha, Clark C Freifeld, John S Brownstein, Macarius M Donneyong, Paula Rausch, Brian M Lappin, Esther H Zhou, Gerald J Dal Pan, Ajinkya M Pawar, Thomas J Hwang, Jerry Avorn, Aaron S Kesselheim
BACKGROUND: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issues drug safety communications (DSCs) to health care professionals, patients, and the public when safety issues emerge related to FDA-approved drug products. These safety messages are disseminated through social media to ensure broad uptake. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to assess the social media dissemination of 2 DSCs released in 2013 for the sleep aid zolpidem. METHODS: We used the MedWatcher Social program and the DataSift historic query tool to aggregate Twitter and Facebook posts from October 1, 2012 through August 31, 2013, a period beginning approximately 3 months before the first DSC and ending 3 months after the second...
January 5, 2018: JMIR Public Health and Surveillance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29283871/resources-for-educating-training-and-mentoring-all-physicians-providing-palliative-care
#15
James Downar
This article presents a rapid review of the published literature and available resources for educating Canadian physicians to provide palliative and end-of-life care. Several key messages emerge from the review. First, there are many palliative care educational resources already available for Canadian physicians. Second, the many palliative care education resources are often not used in physician training. Third, we know that some palliative care educational interventions are inexpensive and scalable, while others are costly and time-consuming; we know very little about which palliative care educational interventions impact physician behavior and patient care...
January 2018: Journal of Palliative Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29274068/individual-supervision-to-enhance-reflexivity-and-the-practice-of-patient-centered-care-experience-at-the-undergraduate-level
#16
Alexandre Berney, Céline Bourquin
This article reports on what is at work during individual supervision of medical students in the context of teaching breaking bad news (BBN). Surprisingly, there is a relative lack of research and report on the topic of supervision, even though it is regularly used in medical training. Building on our research and teaching experience on BBN at the undergraduate level, as well as interviews of supervisors, the following key elements have been identified: learning objectives (e.g., raising student awareness of structural elements of the interview, emotion (patients and students) handling), pedagogical approach (being centered on student's needs and supportive to promote already existing competences), essentials (e...
December 22, 2017: Journal of Cancer Education: the Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Education
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29242920/delivering-bad-news-attitudes-feelings-and-practice-characteristics-among-speech-language-pathologists
#17
Rinat Gold, Azgad Gold
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes, feelings, and practice characteristics of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) in Israel regarding the subject of delivering bad news. Method: One hundred and seventy-three Israeli SLPs answered an online survey. Respondents represented SLPs in Israel in all stages of vocational experience, with varying academic degrees, from a variety of employment settings. The survey addressed emotions involved in the process of delivering bad news, training on this subject, and background information of the respondents...
February 6, 2018: American Journal of Speech-language Pathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29190867/-breaking-bad-news-in-the-emergency-room-suggestions-and-future-challenges
#18
Edgar Landa-Ramírez, Antonio López-Gómez, Irma Jiménez-Escobar, Juan José Sánchez-Sosaa Sánchez-Sosaa
The aim of this paper is to describe educational programs that reportedly teach how to break bad news in the emergency department. We also suggest some recommendations on how to communicate bad news based on the research of evidence available in the field. The examined evidence points toward six major components with which physicians should familiarize when communicating bad news: 1) doctor-patient empathic communication, 2) establishing a proper space to give the news, 3) identifying characteristics of the person who receives the news, 4) essential aspects for communicating the news; 5) emotional support, and 6) medical and administrative aspects of the encounter...
November 2017: Revista Médica del Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29146564/breaking-health-insurance-knowledge-barriers-through-games-pilot-test-of-health-care-america
#19
Sara Champlin, Juli James
BACKGROUND: Having health insurance is associated with a number of beneficial health outcomes. However, previous research suggests that patients tend to avoid health insurance information and often misunderstand or lack knowledge about many health insurance terms. Health insurance knowledge is particularly low among young adults. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to design and test an interactive newsgame (newsgames are games that apply journalistic principles in their creation, for example, gathering stories to immerse the player in narratives) about health insurance...
November 16, 2017: JMIR Serious Games
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29065759/late-breaking-news-abstracts
#20
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2017: Multiple Sclerosis: Clinical and Laboratory Research
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