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Michael D Nevarez, Johanna C Malone, Dorene M Rentz, Robert J Waldinger
OBJECTIVE: Identifying adaptive ways to cope with extreme stress is essential to promoting long-term health. Memory systems are highly sensitive to stress, and combat exposure during war has been shown to have deleterious effects on cognitive processes, such as memory, decades later. No studies have examined coping styles used by combat veterans and associations with later-life cognitive functioning. Defenses are coping mechanisms that manage difficult memories and feelings, with some more closely related to memory processes (e...
October 7, 2016: Comprehensive Psychiatry
A M Cardoso, M G Alves, P P Mathur, P F Oliveira, J E Cavaco, L Rato
In the last decades, several studies evidenced a decrease in male fertility in developed countries. Although the aetiology of this trend in male reproductive health remains a matter of debate, environmental compounds that predispose to weight gain, namely obesogens, are appointed as contributors because of their action as endocrine disruptors. Obesogens favour adipogenesis by an imbalance of metabolic processes and can be found virtually everywhere. These compounds easily accumulate in tissues with high lipid content...
October 24, 2016: Obesity Reviews: An Official Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity
Eleanor E Friedman, Wayne A Duffus
OBJECTIVES: To examine sociodemographic factors and chronic health conditions of people living with HIV (PLWHIV/HIV+) at least 65 years old and compare their chronic disease prevalence with beneficiaries without HIV. DESIGN: National fee-for-service Medicare claims data (parts A and B) from 2006 to 2009 were used to create a retrospective cohort of beneficiaries at least 65 years old. METHODS: Beneficiaries with an inpatient or skilled nursing facility claim, or outpatient claims with HIV diagnosis codes were considered HIV+...
October 23, 2016: AIDS
Brian E Lacy, Michael D Crowell, Carole Mathis, David Bauer, Leslie J Heinberg
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Gastroparesis (GP) patients suffer from recurrent symptoms of nausea, vomiting, early satiety, and abdominal pain. The impact of GP on quality of life (QoL), health care utilization and daily activities is not well understood. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Part 1: 398 adult patients (≥18 y) with documented GP (symptoms >6 mo) were surveyed to assess QoL and pain using the Short Form 36 and McGill pain questionnaires. Part 2: 491 adult GP patients were surveyed to evaluate employment status, work and daily activities, medication use, physician visits, diagnostic testing, emergency room visits, and hospitalizations related to their GP symptoms...
October 21, 2016: Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology
Peter de Jonge, Annelieke M Roest, Carmen C W Lim, Silvia E Florescu, Evelyn J Bromet, Dan J Stein, Meredith Harris, Vladimir Nakov, Jose Miguel Caldas-de-Almeida, Daphna Levinson, Ali O Al-Hamzawi, Josep Maria Haro, Maria Carmen Viana, Guilherme Borges, Siobhan O'Neill, Giovanni de Girolamo, Koen Demyttenaere, Oye Gureje, Noboru Iwata, Sing Lee, Chiyi Hu, Aimee Karam, Jacek Moskalewicz, Viviane Kovess-Masfety, Fernando Navarro-Mateu, Mark Oakley Browne, Marina Piazza, José Posada-Villa, Yolanda Torres, Margreet L Ten Have, Ronald C Kessler, Kate M Scott
CONTEXT: The scarcity of cross-national reports and the changes in Diagnostic and Statistical Manual version 5 (DSM-5) regarding panic disorder (PD) and panic attacks (PAs) call for new epidemiological data on PD and PAs and its subtypes in the general population. OBJECTIVE: To present representative data about the cross-national epidemiology of PD and PAs in accordance with DSM-5 definitions. DESIGN AND SETTING: Nationally representative cross-sectional surveys using the World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview version 3...
October 24, 2016: Depression and Anxiety
Anna D Sinaiko, Karen E Joynt, Meredith B Rosenthal
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 24, 2016: JAMA Internal Medicine
Nayara Halimy Maran, Bruno do Amaral Crispim, Stephanie Ramirez Iahnn, Renata Pires de Araújo, Alexeia Barufatti Grisolia, Kelly Mari Pires de Oliveira
Use of groundwater from private wells in households has increased considerably, owing to a better cost/benefit ratio than that of water provided by local utilities for a fee. However, this water is usually untreated, which makes it a vehicle for diseases. Thus, monitoring this water is necessary to ensure its integrity and quality. We aimed to evaluate the physical, chemical, and microbiological parameters of untreated groundwater drawn from different types of wells, and the antimicrobial susceptibility profile of the bacteria isolated from this water...
October 21, 2016: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Miao Long, Yi Liu, Yu Cao, Nan Wang, Meng Dang, Jianbin He
Lead is harmful for human health and animals. Proanthocyanidins (PCs), a natural antioxidant, possess a broad spectrum of pharmacological and medicinal properties. However, its protective effects against lead-induced liver damage have not been clarified. This study was aimed to evaluate the protective effect of PCs on the hepatotoxicity of male Kunming mice induced by chronic lead exposure. A total of 70 healthy male Kunming mice were averagely divided into four groups: control group, i.e., the group exposed to lead, the group treated with PCs, and the group co-treated with lead and PCs...
October 21, 2016: Nutrients
Fereidoon Shahidi, Adriano Costa de Camargo
Edible oils are the major natural dietary sources of tocopherols and tocotrienols, collectively known as tocols. Plant foods with low lipid content usually have negligible quantities of tocols. However, seeds and other plant food processing by-products may serve as alternative sources of edible oils with considerable contents of tocopherols and tocotrienols. Tocopherols are among the most important lipid-soluble antioxidants in food as well as in human and animal tissues. Tocopherols are found in lipid-rich regions of cells (e...
October 20, 2016: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
Christian Trummer, Marlene Pandis, Nicolas Verheyen, Martin R Grübler, Martin Gaksch, Barbara Obermayer-Pietsch, Andreas Tomaschitz, Thomas R Pieber, Stefan Pilz, Verena Schwetz
Aside from its well-known effects on bone and mineral metabolism, vitamin D may also play an important role in extra-skeletal processes like immunologic diseases, cancer, or cardiovascular diseases. Even though meta-analyses showed that vitamin D supplementation reduces fractures, falls, and overall mortality, its potential benefits did not find universal acclaim. Several health care authorities published Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs) for vitamin D, most of them ranging from 600 to 800 international units (IU) per day, corresponding to a serum level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D of at least 20 ng/mL (50 nmol/L)...
October 19, 2016: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Nancy M Heddle, Richard J Cook, Donald M Arnold, Yang Liu, Rebecca Barty, Mark A Crowther, P J Devereaux, Jack Hirsh, Theodore E Warkentin, Kathryn E Webert, David Roxby, Magdalena Sobieraj-Teague, Andrea Kurz, Daniel I Sessler, Priscilla Figueroa, Martin Ellis, John W Eikelboom
Background Randomized, controlled trials have suggested that the transfusion of blood after prolonged storage does not increase the risk of adverse outcomes among patients, although most of these trials were restricted to high-risk populations and were not powered to detect small but clinically important differences in mortality. We sought to find out whether the duration of blood storage would have an effect on mortality after transfusion in a general population of hospitalized patients. Methods In this pragmatic, randomized, controlled trial conducted at six hospitals in four countries, we randomly assigned patients who required a red-cell transfusion to receive blood that had been stored for the shortest duration (short-term storage group) or the longest duration (long-term storage group) in a 1:2 ratio...
October 24, 2016: New England Journal of Medicine
Belinda Goodenough, Richard Fleming, Michael Young, Kim Burns, Cindy Jones, Fallon Forbes
Providing information about latest research via educational sessions to health professionals caring for people with dementia may be insufficient to drive change. This project explored self-reported impacts on practice change of adding information about knowledge translation (KT) to a national dementia education program. Six national workshop days were held. Each provided the option of participating in a Principles of KT and innovation implementation seminar in addition to a clinical topic update (sexualities and dementia, or managing behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia)...
October 24, 2016: Gerontology & Geriatrics Education
Lisa Groshong, Sonja A Wilhelm Stanis, Andrew T Kaczynski, J Aaron Hipp, Gina M Besenvi
BACKGROUND: Public parks hold promise for promoting population-level PA, but studies show a significant portion of park use is sedentary. Past research has documented the effectiveness of message-based strategies for influencing diverse behaviors in park settings and for increasing PA in non-park contexts. Therefore, to inform message-based interventions (e.g., point-of-decision prompts) to increase park-based PA, the purpose of this study was to elicit insights about key attitudes, perceived norms, and personal agency that affect park use and park-based PA in low-income urban neighborhoods...
October 24, 2016: Journal of Physical Activity & Health
Catherine E Mosher, Rebecca N Adams, Paul R Helft, Bert H O'Neil, Safi Shahda, Nicholas A Rattray, Victoria L Champion
OBJECTIVE: This study assessed positive changes in patients with advanced colorectal cancer and their family caregivers following diagnosis. We compared self-reported positive changes within patient-caregiver dyads as well as self-reports and patient reports of positive changes in caregivers. DESIGN: Individual, semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 23 patients with advanced colorectal cancer and 23 caregivers. A theoretical thematic analysis of interview transcripts was framed by posttraumatic growth theory...
October 24, 2016: Psychology & Health
Matthew Blake, Joanna M Waloszek, Orli Schwartz, Monika Raniti, Julian G Simmons, Laura Blake, Greg Murray, Ronald E Dahl, Richard Bootzin, Paul Dudgeon, John Trinder, Nicholas B Allen
Objective: Sleep problems are a major risk factor for the emergence of mental health problems in adolescence. The aim of this study was to investigate the post intervention effects of a cognitive-behavioral/mindfulness-based group sleep intervention on sleep and mental health among at-risk adolescents. Method: A randomized controlled trial (RCT) was conducted across High schools in Melbourne, Australia. One hundred forty-four adolescents (aged 12-17 years) with high levels of anxiety and sleeping difficulties, but without past or current depressive disorder, were randomized into either a sleep improvement intervention or an active control 'study skills' intervention...
October 24, 2016: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Ashley M Smith, Amanda Jensen-Doss
Improving mental health services for youth in usual care (UC) is one of the most critical issues in mental health services research. Identification of change groups in UC (e.g., recovery, improvement, no response, deterioration) can help researchers gain a richer understanding of UC and facilitate efforts to tailor UC to individuals who may not be responding well to treatment. This study used the reliable change index (RCI; Jacobson & Truax, 1991) to examine change groups within youth UC on two parent report outcome measures-symptom severity and functioning-using a large, naturalistic sample of youth (N = 672) treated in UC served at four clinics operating under a large county-wide public mental health authority...
October 24, 2016: Psychological Services
H T Banks, John E Banks, R A Everett, John D Stark
We develop statistical and mathematical based methodologies for determining (as the experiment progresses) the amount of information required to complete the estimation of stable population parameters with pre-specified levels of confidence. We do this in the context of life table models and data for growth/death for three species of Daphniids as investigated by J. Stark and J. Banks [17]. The ideas developed here also have wide application in the health and social sciences where experimental data are often expensive as well as difficult to obtain...
August 1, 2016: Mathematical Biosciences and Engineering: MBE
Irena Stepanikova, Gabriela R Oates, Lori Brand Bateman
OBJECTIVE: This study investigates the associations of body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) with markers of systemic inflammation in midlife by race and gender. DESIGN: Data were obtained from the Survey of Midlife in the United States, a cross-sectional, observational study of Americans 35 years old or older (White men: N = 410; White women: N = 490; Black men: N = 58; Black women: N = 117). Inflammation was measured by concentrations of fibrinogen and C-reactive protein (CRP) in fasting plasma and concentrations of E-selectin and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in fasting serum...
October 24, 2016: Ethnicity & Health
M H Kuniholm, X Xie, K Anastos, X Xue, L Reimers, A L French, S J Gange, S G Kassaye, A Kovacs, T Wang, B E Aouizerat, H D Strickler
Human leucocyte antigen (HLA) genes play a central role in response to pathogens and in autoimmunity. Research to understand the effects of HLA genes on health has been limited because HLA genotyping protocols are labour intensive and expensive. Recently, algorithms to impute HLA genotype data using genome-wide association study (GWAS) data have been published. However, imputation accuracy for most of these algorithms was based primarily on training data sets of European ancestry individuals. We considered performance of two HLA-dedicated imputation algorithms - SNP2HLA and HIBAG - in a multiracial population of n = 1587 women with HLA genotyping data by gold standard methods...
October 24, 2016: International Journal of Immunogenetics
Y S Choi, E J Lee
: WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Panic disorder patients display various panic-related physical symptoms and catastrophic misinterpretation of bodily sensations, which lower their quality of life by interfering with daily activities. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is a useful strategy for panic disorder patients to manage symptoms associated with inaccurate cognitive interpretation of situations resulting from the patient's cognitive vulnerability. In South Korea, however, despite the increasing prevalence of panic disorder, CBT is not a common element of nursing care plans for panic disorder patients...
October 24, 2016: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing
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