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Biomarkers in Concussion

Svetlana A Dambinova, Joseph C Maroon, Alicia M Sufrinko, John David Mullins, Eugenia V Alexandrova, Alexander A Potapov
Concussion is a complex, heterogeneous process affecting the brain. Accurate assessment and diagnosis and appropriate management of concussion are essential to ensure that athletes do not prematurely return to play or others to work or active military duty, risking re-injury. To date, clinical diagnosis relies primarily on evaluating subjects for functional impairment using instruments that include neurocognitive testing, subjective symptom report, and neurobehavioral assessments, such as balance and vestibular-ocular reflex testing...
2016: Frontiers in Neurology
William Peacock
Dear Editor I read with great interest the manuscript titled "A New Panel of Blood Biomarkers for the Diagnosis of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury/Concussion in Adults" by Shan R, et al, published in the January issue of the Journal. (1) I do have some questions. The key to marker discovery studies is a precise and accurate description of how the population was identified, including controls. I have significant concerns about the control population in the manuscript. In the presentation the characteristics of the control group are unclear, described only as "not patients in the ED" and with the same exclusion criteria of the other cohorts...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Neurotrauma
Michael W Collins, Anthony P Kontos, David O Okonkwo, Jon Almquist, Julian Bailes, Mark Barisa, Jeffrey Bazarian, O Josh Bloom, David Brody, Robert Cantu, Javier Cardenas, Jay Clugston, Randall Cohen, Ruben Echemendia, R J Elbin, Richard Ellenbogen, Janna Fonseca, Gerard Gioia, Kevin Guskiewicz, Robert Heyer, Gillian Hotz, Grant L Iverson, Barry Jordan, Geoffrey Manley, Joseph Maroon, Thomas McAllister, Michael McCrea, Anne Mucha, Elizabeth Pieroth, Kenneth Podell, Matthew Pombo, Teena Shetty, Allen Sills, Gary Solomon, Danny G Thomas, Tamara C Valovich McLeod, Tony Yates, Ross Zafonte
BACKGROUND: Conventional management for concussion involves prescribed rest and progressive return to activity. Recent evidence challenges this notion and suggests that active approaches may be effective for some patients. Previous concussion consensus statements provide limited guidance regarding active treatment. OBJECTIVE: To describe the current landscape of treatment for concussion and to provide summary agreements related to treatment to assist clinicians in the treatment of concussion...
October 12, 2016: Neurosurgery
Jonathan Lifshitz, Rachel K Rowe, Daniel R Griffiths, Megan N Evilsizor, Theresa C Thomas, P David Adelson, Tracy K McIntosh
BACKGROUND: After 30 years of characterisation and implementation, fluid percussion injury (FPI) is firmly recognised as one of the best-characterised reproducible and clinically relevant models of TBI, encompassing concussion through diffuse axonal injury (DAI). Depending on the specific injury parameters (e.g. injury site, mechanical force), FPI can model diffuse TBI with or without a focal component and may be designated as mild-to-severe according to the chosen mechanical forces and resulting acute neurological responses...
August 11, 2016: Brain Injury: [BI]
Edrea Khong, Nicole Odenwald, Eyesha Hashim, Michael D Cusimano
OBJECTIVES: To review the evidence for the use of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) parameters in the human brain as a diagnostic tool for and predictor of post-concussion syndrome (PCS) after a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). DESIGN: Systematic review. DATA SOURCES: All relevant studies in AMED, Embase, MEDLINE, Ovid, PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science through 20 May, 2016. STUDY SELECTION: Studies that analyze traditional DTI measures [fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), radial diffusivity (RD), and axial diffusivity (AD)] and the severity of PCS symptoms or the development of PCS in humans after an mTBI...
2016: Frontiers in Neurology
Silvana Riggio, Andy Jagoda
A concussion results from a force to the brain that results in a transient loss of connectivity within the brain. Sport psychiatrists are increasingly called to be part of the concussion team and need to be prepared to manage issues related to concussion and its behavioural sequelae. Objectively, the best evidence available suggests that deficits in attention and/or in balance are the most reliable objective findings that a concussion has occurred. Prognosis after a concussion is generally very good, although a sub-set of patients that are yet well defined seem pre-disposed to delayed recovery...
September 27, 2016: International Review of Psychiatry
Henrik Zetterberg, Kaj Blennow
Diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for mild traumatic brain injury (TBI), also known as concussion, remain a major unmet clinical need. Moderate to severe TBI can be diagnosed definitively by clinical assessment and standard neuroimaging techniques that detect the gross damage to the brain parenchyma. Diagnostic tools for mild TBI are lacking and, currently, the diagnosis has to be made on clinical grounds alone, because most patients show no gross pathological changes on CT. Most patients with mild TBI recover quickly, but about 15% develop an ill-defined condition called postconcussive syndrome (PCS)...
October 2016: Nature Reviews. Neurology
Jina Ko, Matthew A Hemphill, David Gabrieli, Leon Wu, Venkata Yelleswarapu, Gladys Lawrence, Wesley Pennycooke, Anup Singh, Dave F Meaney, David Issadore
A major impediment to improving the treatment of concussion is our current inability to identify patients that will experience persistent problems after the injury. Recently, brain-derived exosomes, which cross the blood-brain barrier and circulate following injury, have shown great potential as a noninvasive biomarker of brain recovery. However, clinical use of exosomes has been constrained by their small size (30-100 nm) and the extensive sample preparation (>24 hr) needed for traditional exosome measurements...
2016: Scientific Reports
Alex P Di Battista, Shawn G Rhind, Doug Richards, Nathan Churchill, Andrew J Baker, Michael G Hutchison
The long-term health effects of concussion and sub-concussive impacts in sport are unknown. Growing evidence suggests both inflammation and neurodegeneration are pivotal to secondary injury processes and the etiology of neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study we characterized circulating brain injury and inflammatory mediators in healthy male and female athletes according to concussion history and collision sport participation. Eighty-seven university level athletes (male, n = 60; female, n = 27) were recruited before the start of the competitive season...
2016: PloS One
Tara Rhine, Lynn Babcock, Nanhua Zhang, James Leach, Shari L Wade
OBJECTIVES: To compare serum biomarker levels between children with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and orthopaedic injury (OI), acutely following injury. Secondarily, to explore the association between biomarker levels and symptom burden over 1 month post-injury. METHODS: This was a prospective cohort study of children aged 11-16 years who presented to the emergency department within 6 hours of sustaining mTBI or isolated extremity OI. Serum was drawn at the time of study enrollment and levels of ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) and glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP) were analysed...
2016: Brain Injury: [BI]
Andrew W Kuhn, Scott L Zuckerman, Gary Solomon, Ira Casson
INTRODUCTION: Repetitive brain trauma (RBT) in American football has become a topic of recent interest. The objective of this study was to assess the interrelationships among neuroimaging findings with neurocognitive test performance and symptom endorsement in a cohort of retired professional (National Football League [NFL]) football players. METHODS: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were performed in 45 retired NFL players. Three neuroimaging parameters were recorded by blinded, board-certified neuroradiologists: (1) the absence or presence of small or large cavum septum pellucidum; (2) a global mean score of fractional anisotropy (FA); and (3) the presence or absence of microhemorrhages (microbleeds)...
August 2016: Neurosurgery
Christina Lin Master, Abdullah Bin Zahid, Julia Lockyer, Eileen Houseknecht, Vikalpa Dammavalam, Matthew Grady, Michael Nance, Uzma Samadani
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2016: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Leodante da Costa, Christiaan Bas van Niftrik, David Crane, Jorn Fierstra, Allison Bethune
OBJECTIVE: Increased awareness around neurocognitive deficits after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) has progressed the search for objective, diagnostic, and monitoring tools, yet imaging biomarkers for mTBI and recovery are not established in clinical use. It has been suggested that mTBI impairs cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) to CO2, which could be related to post-concussive syndrome (PCS). We investigate CVR evolution after mTBI using blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and possible correlation with PCS...
2016: Frontiers in Neurology
Vernon B Williams, Ilan J Danan
The approach to sports concussion diagnosis and management has been evolving at an unprecedented rate over the last several years. So much so, that committees at all level of sports have implemented concussion protocols and made adjustments to certain league rules in an effort to minimize the risk of head injury. With this newfound attention has come an even greater push by the scientific community to address the many questions that remain. The aim of this review article is to present the topic of sports concussion by means of discreet eras...
June 2016: Current Pain and Headache Reports
Meeryo C Choe
Concussion is a significant issue in medicine and the media today. With growing interest on the long-term effects of sports participation, it is important to understand what occurs in the brain after an impact of any degree. While some of the basic pathophysiology has been elucidated, much is still unknown about what happens in the brain after traumatic brain injury, particularly with milder injuries where no damage can be seen at the structural level on standard neuroimaging. Understanding the chain of events from a cellular level using studies investigating more severe injuries can help to drive research efforts in understanding the symptomatology that is seen in the acute phase after concussion, as well as point to mechanisms that may underlie persistent post-concussive symptoms...
June 2016: Current Pain and Headache Reports
Mark Tommerdahl, Robert G Dennis, Eric M Francisco, Jameson K Holden, Richard Nguyen, Oleg V Favorov
The purpose of this research was to determine if cortical metrics-a unique set of sensory-based assessment tools-could be used to characterize and differentiate concussed individuals from nonconcussed individuals. Cortical metrics take advantage of the somatotopic relationship between skin and cortex, and the protocols are designed to evoke interactions between adjacent cortical regions to investigate fundamental mechanisms that mediate cortical-cortical interactions. Student athletes, aged 18 to 22 years, were recruited into the study through an athletic training center that made determinations of postconcussion return-to-play status...
May 2016: Military Medicine
Linda Papa, Gretchen M Brophy, Robert D Welch, Lawrence M Lewis, Carolina F Braga, Ciara N Tan, Neema J Ameli, Marco A Lopez, Crystal A Haeussler, Diego I Mendez Giordano, Salvatore Silvestri, Philip Giordano, Kurt D Weber, Crystal Hill-Pryor, Dallas C Hack
IMPORTANCE: Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) have been widely studied and show promise for clinical usefulness in suspected traumatic brain injury (TBI) and concussion. Understanding their diagnostic accuracy over time will help translate them into clinical practice. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the temporal profiles of GFAP and UCH-L1 in a large cohort of trauma patients seen at the emergency department and to assess their diagnostic accuracy over time, both individually and in combination, for detecting mild to moderate TBI (MMTBI), traumatic intracranial lesions on head computed tomography (CT), and neurosurgical intervention...
May 1, 2016: JAMA Neurology
Rachel E Ventura, Laura J Balcer, Steven L Galetta, Janet C Rucker
Mild head injury such as concussions and subconcussive repetitive impact may lead to subtle changes in brain function and it is imperative to find sensitive and reliable tests to detect such changes. Tests involving the visual system, in particular eye movements, can incorporate higher cortical functioning and involve diffuse pathways in the brain, including many areas susceptible to head impact. With concussions, the clinical neuro-ophthalmic exam is important for detecting abnormalities in vergence, saccades, pursuit, and visual fixation...
February 15, 2016: Journal of the Neurological Sciences
Diana O Svaldi, Emily C McCuen, Chetas Joshi, Meghan E Robinson, Yeseul Nho, Robert Hannemann, Eric A Nauman, Larry J Leverenz, Thomas M Talavage
As participation in women's soccer continues to grow and the longevity of female athletes' careers continues to increase, prevention and care for mTBI in women's soccer has become a major concern for female athletes since the long-term risks associated with a history of mTBI are well documented. Among women's sports, soccer exhibits among the highest concussion rates, on par with those of men's football at the collegiate level. Head impact monitoring technology has revealed that "concussive hits" occurring directly before symptomatic injury are not predictive of mTBI, suggesting that the cumulative effect of repetitive head impacts experienced by collision sport athletes should be assessed...
January 26, 2016: Brain Imaging and Behavior
Jonathan M Oliver, Margaret T Jones, K Michele Kirk, David A Gable, Justin T Repshas, Torie A Johnson, Ulf Andréasson, Niklas Norgren, Kaj Blennow, Henrik Zetterberg
PURPOSE: American football athletes are exposed to subconcussive impacts over the course of the season resulting in elevations in serum neurofilament light (NFL), a biomarker of axonal injury. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) has been reported to reduce axonal trauma associated with traumatic brain injury in rodent models. However, the optimal dose in American football athletes is unknown. This study examined the effect of differing doses of DHA on serum NFL over the course of a season of American football...
June 2016: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
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