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prehospital hemorrhage death

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28910469/prehospital-administration-of-tranexamic-acid-by-ground-forces-in-afghanistan-the-prehospital-trauma-registry-experience
#1
Steven G Schauer, Michael D April, Jason F Naylor, Jonathan Wiese, Kathy L Ryan, Andrew D Fisher, Cord W Cunningham, Noah Mitchell, Mark A Antonacci
BACKGROUND: Tranexamic acid (TXA) was shown to reduce overall mortality and death secondary to hemorrhage in a large prospective study. This intervention is time sensitive. As such, the Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) guidelines recommend use of this low-cost, safe intervention among patients with possible hemorrhagic shock, penetrating trauma to the thorax or trunk, or extremity amputation. OBJECTIVE: Prehospital administration of TXA by ground forces in the Afghanistan combat theater is described...
2017: Journal of Special Operations Medicine: a Peer Reviewed Journal for SOF Medical Professionals
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28832355/prehospital-hemostatic-resuscitation-to-achieve-zero-preventable-deaths-after-traumatic-injury
#2
Philip C Spinella, Andrew P Cap
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To describe how hemostatic resuscitation can be used in the prehospital phase of resuscitation to reduce preventable deaths after traumatic injury. RECENT FINDINGS: Hemorrhagic shock is the leading cause of death that is preventable after injury. The National Academy of Sciences, recently, recommended that achievement of zero preventable deaths after traumatic injury should be the goal of a national trauma system. In the United States, there are an estimated 25 000 preventable deaths per year in the prehospital phase of resuscitation because of traumatic hemorrhagic shock...
August 21, 2017: Current Opinion in Hematology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28745691/-causal-relationships-in-stroke-and-kidney-injury
#3
A M Gerdt, A M Shutov, M V Menzorov, E A Gubareva
AIM: To assess the frequency, severity, and causes of acute kidney injury (AKI) in patients with stroke. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: 272 patients (143 men and 129 women) (mean age, 66.7±11.6 years) with stroke were examined. The 2008 European Stroke Organization (ESO) guidelines were used to diagnose stroke, to determine indications for and contraindications to thrombolytic therapy, and to evaluate its efficiency. Hemorrhagic and ischemic strokes (HS and IS) were diagnosed in 52 (19%) and 220 (81%) patients, respectively...
2017: Terapevticheskiĭ Arkhiv
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28742797/a-comparison-of-selective-aortic-arch-perfusion-and-resuscitative-endovascular-balloon-occlusion-of-the-aorta-for-the-management-of-hemorrhage-induced-traumatic-cardiac-arrest-a-translational-model-in-large-swine
#4
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Ed B G Barnard, James E Manning, Jason E Smith, Jason M Rall, Jennifer M Cox, James D Ross
BACKGROUND: Survival rates remain low after hemorrhage-induced traumatic cardiac arrest (TCA). Noncompressible torso hemorrhage (NCTH) is a major cause of potentially survivable trauma death. Resuscitative Endovascular Balloon Occlusion of the Aorta (REBOA) at the thoracic aorta (Zone 1) can limit subdiaphragmatic blood loss and allow for IV fluid resuscitation when intrinsic cardiac activity is still present. Selective Aortic Arch Perfusion (SAAP) combines thoracic aortic balloon hemorrhage control with intra-aortic oxygenated perfusion to achieve return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) when cardiac arrest has occurred...
July 2017: PLoS Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28742231/different-resuscitation-strategies-and-novel-pharmacologic-treatment-with-valproic-acid-in-traumatic-brain-injury
#5
REVIEW
Simone E Dekker, Vahagn C Nikolian, Martin Sillesen, Ted Bambakidis, Patrick Schober, Hasan B Alam
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death in young adults, and effective treatment strategies have the potential to save many lives. TBI results in coagulopathy, endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, cell death, and impaired epigenetic homeostasis, ultimately leading to morbidity and/or mortality. Commonly used resuscitation fluids such as crystalloids or colloids have several disadvantages and might even be harmful when administered in large quantities. There is a need for next-generation treatment strategies (especially in the prehospital setting) that minimize cellular damage, improve survival, and enhance neurological recovery...
July 25, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28657831/case-report-life-saving-application-of-commercial-tourniquet-in-pediatric-extremity-hemorrhage
#6
David W Callaway, Andrew Puciaty, Josh Robertson, Tony Hannon, Sarah E Fabiano
Hemorrhage is the leading preventable cause of death in civilian and military trauma. Recent data from the ongoing conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan suggest that early and aggressive tourniquet utilization is a safe and effective way to dramatically reduce mortality from extremity hemorrhage. As a result, prehospital tourniquet use is now endorsed by a majority of professional emergency medicine, emergency medical service and trauma professional societies. However, there currently exists scant evidence supporting the efficacy of commercially available tourniquets in controlling extremity hemorrhage in pediatric trauma patients...
June 28, 2017: Prehospital Emergency Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28628603/field-and-en-route-resuscitative-endovascular-occlusion-of-the-aorta-a-feasible-military-reality
#7
Viktor A Reva, Tal M Hörer, Andrey I Makhnovskiy, Mikhail V Sokhranov, Igor M Samokhvalov, Joseph J DuBose
BACKGROUND: Severe noncompressible torso hemorrhage remains a leading cause of potentially preventable death in modern military conflicts. Resuscitative endovascular occlusion of the aorta (REBOA) has demonstrated potential as an effective adjunct to the treatment of noncompressible torso hemorrhage in the civilian early hospital and even prehospital settings-but the application of this technology for military prehospital use has not been well described. We aimed to assess the feasibility of both field and en route prehospital REBOA in the military exercise setting, simulating a modern armed conflict...
July 2017: Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28601205/remote-damage-control-resuscitation-in-austere-environments
#8
REVIEW
Ronald Chang, Brian J Eastridge, John B Holcomb
Hemorrhage is the leading cause of preventable military and civilian trauma death. Damage control resuscitation with concomitant mechanical hemorrhage control has become the preferred in-hospital treatment of hemorrhagic shock. In particular, plasma-based resuscitation with decreased volumes of crystalloids and artificial colloids as part of damage control resuscitation has improved outcomes in the military and civilian sectors. However, translation of these principles and techniques to the prehospital, remote, and austere environments, known as remote damage control resuscitation, is challenging given the resource limitations in these settings...
June 2017: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28601204/battlefield-analgesia-in-tactical-combat-casualty-care
#9
REVIEW
Ian S Wedmore, Frank K Butler
At the start of the Afghanistan conflict, battlefield analgesia for US military casualties was achieved primarily through the use of intramuscular (IM) morphine. This is a suboptimal choice, since IM morphine is slow-acting, leading to delays in effective pain relief and the risk of overdose and death when dosing is repeated in order to hasten the onset of analgesia. Advances in battlefield analgesia, pioneered initially by Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC), and the Army's 75th Ranger Regiment, have now been incorporated into the Triple-Option Analgesia approach...
June 2017: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28599052/tccc-updates-two-decades-of-saving-lives-on-the-battlefield-tactical-combat-casualty-care-turns-20
#10
Frank K Butler
BACKGROUND: Twenty years ago, the original Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) article was published in this journal. Since TCCC is essentially a set of bestpractice prehospital trauma care guidelines customized for use on the battlefield, the presence of a journal with a specific focus on military medicine was a profound benefit to the initial presentation of TCCC to the US Military. METHODS: In the two ensuing decades, which included the longest continuous period of armed conflict in our nation's history, TCCC steadily evolved as the prehospital trauma care evidence base was augmented and as feedback from user medics, corpsmen, and pararescuemen was obtained...
December 0: Journal of Special Operations Medicine: a Peer Reviewed Journal for SOF Medical Professionals
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28590355/pre-hospital-administration-of-freeze-dried-plasma-is-it-the-solution-for-trauma-casualties
#11
Shlaifer Amir, Siman-Tov Maya, Radomislensky Irina, Peleg Kobi, Shina Avi, Baruch N Erez, Glassberg Elon, Yitzhak Avraham
BACKGROUND: Hemorrhage, is the leading cause of possible preventable death in the battlefield. There is an increasing evidence for the effectiveness of blood component therapy in general, and plasma infusion in particular but their use is less applicable in the pre-hospital setting due to logistic difficulties. Israeli Defense Force has implemented the use of freeze dried plasma (FDP) at the point of injury (POI), this adoption of FDP use entailed doubts regarding the feasibility and effectiveness of this practice...
June 6, 2017: Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28333833/leadership-and-a-casualty-response-system-for-eliminating-preventable-death
#12
Russ S Kotwal, Harold R Montgomery, Ethan A Miles, Curtis C Conklin, Michael T Hall, Stanley A McChrystal
Combat casualties who die from their injuries do so primarily in the prehospital setting. Although most of these deaths result from injuries that are nonsurvivable, some are potentially survivable. Of injuries that are potentially survivable, most are from hemorrhage. Thus, military organizations should direct efforts toward prehospital care, particularly through early hemorrhage control and remote damage control resuscitation, to eliminate preventable death on the battlefield. A systems-based approach and priority of effort for institutionalizing such care was developed and maintained by medical personnel and command-directed by nonmedical combatant leaders within the 75th Ranger Regiment, U...
June 2017: Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28290925/two-decades-of-saving-lives-on-the-battlefield-tactical-combat-casualty-care-turns-20
#13
Frank K Butler
BACKGROUND: Twenty years ago, the original Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) article was published in this journal. Since TCCC is essentially a set of best-practice prehospital trauma care guidelines customized for use on the battlefield, the presence of a journal with a specific focus on military medicine was a profound benefit to the initial presentation of TCCC to the U.S. Military. METHODS: In the two ensuing decades, which included the longest continuous period of armed conflict in our nation's history, TCCC steadily evolved as the prehospital trauma care evidence base was augmented and as feedback from user medics, corpsmen, and pararescuemen was obtained...
March 2017: Military Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28284483/tactical-combat-casualty-care-beginnings
#14
REVIEW
Frank K Butler
Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) is a set of evidence-based, best-practice prehospital trauma care guidelines customized for use on the battlefield. The origins of TCCC were nontraditional. The TCCC program began as a Naval Special Warfare biomedical research effort launched after the realization that extremity hemorrhage, a leading cause of preventable death on the battlefield, was not being treated with a readily available and highly effective intervention: the tourniquet. This insight prompted a systematic reevaluation of all aspects of battlefield trauma care that was conducted from 1993 to 1996 as a joint effort by special operations medical personnel and the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences...
June 2017: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28255632/population-based-autopsy-study-of-traumatic-fatalities
#15
S Saar, A Lomp, J Laos, V Mihnovitš, R Šalkauskas, T Lustenberger, M Väli, U Lepner, P Talving
BACKGROUND: Injuries result in 5.8 million global fatalities annually and are the leading cause of death in younger individuals. Nevertheless, population-based autopsy investigations on traumatic deaths are scarce. We set out to study all consecutive autopsies on traumatic fatalities performed in a 5-year time segment in Estonia. METHODS: After the ethics review board approval, all consecutive autopsies after blunt or penetrating deaths occurring in prehospital or in-hospital settings between January 1, 2009, and December 31, 2013, were retrospectively reviewed using the National Forensic Medicine Database...
July 2017: World Journal of Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28238499/out-of-hospital-triage-of-older-adults-with-head-injury-%C3%A2-a%C3%A2-retrospective-study-of-the-effect-of-adding-anticoagulation-or-antiplatelet-medication-use-as-a-criterion
#16
Daniel K Nishijima, Samuel D Gaona, Trent Waechter, Ric Maloney, Troy Bair, Adam Blitz, Andrew R Elms, Roel D Farrales, Calvin Howard, James Montoya, Jeneita M Bell, Mark Faul, David R Vinson, Hernando Garzon, James F Holmes, Dustin W Ballard
STUDY OBJECTIVE: Field triage guidelines recommend that emergency medical services (EMS) providers consider transport of head-injured older adults with anticoagulation use to trauma centers. However, the triage patterns and the incidence of intracranial hemorrhage or neurosurgery in these patients are unknown. Our objective is to describe the characteristics and outcomes of older adults with head trauma who are transported by EMS, particularly for patients who do not meet physiologic, anatomic, or mechanism-of-injury (steps 1 to 3) field triage criteria but are receiving anticoagulant or antiplatelet medications...
August 2017: Annals of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27918852/anomaly-detection-outperforms-logistic-regression-in-predicting-outcomes-in-trauma-patients
#17
Zachary D W Dezman, Chen Gao, Shiming Yang, Peter Hu, Li Yao, Hsiao-Chi Li, Chein-I Chang, Colin Mackenzie
OBJECTIVE: Recent advancements in trauma resuscitation have shown a great benefit of early identification and control of hemorrhage, which is the most common cause of death in injured patients. We introduce a new analytical approach, anomaly detection (AD), as an alternative method to the traditional logistic regression (LR) method in predicting which injured patients receive transfusions, intensive care, and other interventions. METHODS: We abstracted routinely collected prehospital vital sign data from patient records (adult patients who survived more than 15 minutes after being directly admitted to a level 1 trauma center)...
March 2017: Prehospital Emergency Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27814743/prehospital-fibrinolysis-versus-primary-percutaneous-coronary-intervention-in-st-elevation-myocardial-infarction-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis-of-randomized-controlled-trials
#18
Vincent Roule, Pierre Ardouin, Katrien Blanchart, Adrien Lemaitre, Julien Wain-Hobson, Damien Legallois, Joachim Alexandre, Rémi Sabatier, Paul Milliez, Farzin Beygui
BACKGROUND: Primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) is the preferred reperfusion strategy in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), but its benefit over prehospital fibrinolysis (FL) is not clear. METHODS: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials in which outcomes of patients with STEMI managed with FL early in the prehospital setting versus PPCI were compared. RESULTS: Compared with PPCI, FL was consistently associated with similar rates of short-term (30-90 days) death (relative risk [RR] 0...
November 5, 2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27779578/does-small-volume-resuscitation-with-crystalloids-or-colloids-influence-hemostasis-and-survival-of-rabbits-subjected-to-lethal-uncontrolled-hemorrhage
#19
Bijan Shams Kheirabadi, Nahir Miranda, Irasema B Terrazas, Mary D Gonzales, Rose C Grimm, Michael A Dubick
BACKGROUND: Prehospital, small-volume resuscitation of combat casualties with a synthetic colloid (6% hydroxyethyl starch [HES] 670/0.75) has been recommended when blood or blood components are unavailable. We studied hemostatic effects of a newer synthetic colloid (6% HES, 130/0.4) compared with either a natural colloid (albumin) or to crystalloids in an uncontrolled hemorrhage model. METHODS: Spontaneously breathing New Zealand white rabbits (3.4 ± 0.1 kg) were anesthetized, instrumented, and subjected to a splenic injury with uncontrolled bleeding...
January 2017: Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27595109/hypotensive-resuscitation-among-trauma-patients
#20
REVIEW
Matthew M Carrick, Jan Leonard, Denetta S Slone, Charles W Mains, David Bar-Or
Hemorrhagic shock is a principal cause of death among trauma patients within the first 24 hours after injury. Optimal fluid resuscitation strategies have been examined for nearly a century, more recently with several randomized controlled trials. Hypotensive resuscitation, also called permissive hypotension, is a resuscitation strategy that uses limited fluids and blood products during the early stages of treatment for hemorrhagic shock. A lower-than-normal blood pressure is maintained until operative control of the bleeding can occur...
2016: BioMed Research International
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