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Teeth injuries

Y Nouma, W Ben Amar, M Zribi, S Bardaa, Z Hammami, S Maatoug
We report a case of a Tunisian footballer who was found dead abroad under suspicious circumstances. The cause of death was, originally, attributed to a lightning strike. The corpse was buried without/autopsy. Over thirty years later, the family requested the exhumation to verify the identity and the cause of death. The exhumation was performed in 2011. DNA profiling from teeth and femur bone samples confirmed the identity of the deceased. The dry bone study revealed defects in the skull and the pelvis evoking firearm injuries...
October 11, 2016: Journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine
Edna Perez, Linda S Behar-Horenstein, Marcio Guelmann
Children with intellectual and physical disabilities including autism are susceptible to dental trauma as a sequela from falls due to poor muscular coordination. In addition, their altered muscle tonus often results in an open bite with labial flaring of the maxillary incisors and lip incompetence, predisposing these teeth to fractures. This case report describes an alternative approach of restoring a fractured maxillary permanent central incisor with a composite strip crown during surgical repositioning of the periodontium on an autistic patient...
September 1, 2016: Journal of Contemporary Dental Practice
Shaul Lin, Nir Pilosof, Munir Karawani, Ronald Wigler, Arieh Y Kaufman, Sorin T Teich
BACKGROUND: This study explores the pattern of complications occurrence resulting from traumatic dental injuries, the relation of this pattern to the number of years from the time of the injury to its first diagnosis, and other contributing characteristics such as root development and trauma characteristic. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients' data treated following dental trauma from 2002 to 2014 were classified and grouped according to age, gender, tooth type, injury type, diagnosis and the time that elapsed between the traumatic event and the diagnosis of complications (TIC)...
October 2016: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Dentistry
Jessica Ratajczak, Annelies Bronckaers, Yörg Dillen, Pascal Gervois, Tim Vangansewinkel, Ronald B Driesen, Esther Wolfs, Ivo Lambrichts, Petra Hilkens
Within the field of tissue engineering, natural tissues are reconstructed by combining growth factors, stem cells, and different biomaterials to serve as a scaffold for novel tissue growth. As adequate vascularization and innervation are essential components for the viability of regenerated tissues, there is a high need for easily accessible stem cells that are capable of supporting these functions. Within the human tooth and its surrounding tissues, different stem cell populations can be distinguished, such as dental pulp stem cells, stem cells from human deciduous teeth, stem cells from the apical papilla, dental follicle stem cells, and periodontal ligament stem cells...
2016: Stem Cells International
Garrett G A Casale, Brian A Fishero, Stephen S Park, Mark Sochor, Sara B Heltzel, J Jared Christophel
Importance: The practice of facial trauma surgery would benefit from a useful quantitative scale that measures the extent of injury. Objective: To develop a facial trauma scale that incorporates only reducible fractures and is able to be reliably communicated to health care professionals. Design and Setting: A cadaveric tissue study was conducted from October 1 to 3, 2014. Ten cadaveric heads were subjected to various degrees of facial trauma by dropping a fixed mass onto each head...
September 29, 2016: JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery
Stefan Hartwig, Andreas Boettner, Christian Doll, Jan O Voss, Moritz Hertel, Saskia Preissner, Jan D Raguse
BACKGROUND/AIMS: Intermaxillary fixation is a standard procedure for the treatment of mandibular fractures or in orthognathic surgery. Pre-drilling for screws poses the risk of accidental tooth-root injury, potentially leading to further pathological processes. Limited evidence about accidental tooth injury during intermaxillary fixation is available due to heterogenous study designs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the risk of root trauma using pre-drilled transgingival fixation screws and the clinical consequences for the affected teeth...
September 28, 2016: Dental Traumatology: Official Publication of International Association for Dental Traumatology
Pallav Mahesh Patni, Pradeep Jain, Mona Jain Patni
INTRODUCTION: The fracture of front teeth is one of the routine presentations of traumatic injuries. The treatment of a fractured tooth involving the pulp includes root canal therapy and post placement followed by core build-up or by the extraction of the fractured tooth if it is not restorable. CASE PRESENTATION: We report a case of an adult male who had traumatized both his maxillary central incisors following a blow experienced during domestic violence. He had lost a fractured fragment of the right central incisor, while the left incisor had complicated fractures with fragments retained attached to the soft tissue...
June 2016: Archives of Trauma Research
M S Mutluay, A T Mutluay
Traumatic injuries usually involve the anterior teeth of children and young patients. Periapical lesions are the most common findings due to this injuries. Calcium hydroxide has the potential to maintain a sterile root canal and stimulate healing of periapical pathology. At two cases, the necrotic pulp exudate was removed and a calcium hydroxide paste dressing material was placed inside the root canals up to the apices. The paste waste changed every three weeks. Periapical healing was observed at control visits without surgery and continued at the 12-months review...
January 11, 2016: West Indian Medical Journal
N Ivancic Jokic, D Bakarcic, R Grzic, M Majstorovic, M Sostarek
INTRODUCTION: Injuries of decidouos and premanent teeth can be rather hard, esspecially in combinatin if they involve adjacent supportive tissue. Among all injuries, the loss of the teeth is considered the most stressful for both a child and its parents. Tooth injury usually involves soft tissue damage, which means severe bleeding. As parents often look for help from their family general practitioners, it is very important that general practitioner is acquainted with the first aid in order to preserve the tooth and enable further skeletal development...
August 31, 2016: European Journal of Dental Education: Official Journal of the Association for Dental Education in Europe
Hossein Ghaeminia, John Perry, Marloes E L Nienhuijs, Verena Toedtling, Marcia Tummers, Theo J M Hoppenreijs, Wil J M Van der Sanden, Theodorus G Mettes
BACKGROUND: Prophylactic removal of asymptomatic disease-free impacted wisdom teeth is surgical removal of wisdom teeth in the absence of symptoms and with no evidence of local disease. Impacted wisdom teeth may be associated with pathological changes, such as pericoronitis, root resorption, gum and alveolar bone disease (periodontitis), caries and the development of cysts and tumours. When surgical removal is carried out in older people, the risk of postoperative complications, pain and discomfort is increased...
2016: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
Tarek Mohamed A Saoud, Sonali Mistry, Bill Kahler, Asgeir Sigurdsson, Louis M Lin
INTRODUCTION: Traumatic injury to the teeth can cause horizontal root fractures and inflammatory root resorptions (external and internal). Traditionally, traumatized teeth with horizontal root fractures resulting in pulp necrosis and inflammatory root resorptions are treated with conventional root canal therapy. METHODS: A 15-year-old boy had a history of traumatic injury to mature tooth #8 resulting in horizontal root fracture and pulp necrosis of the coronal fragment...
October 2016: Journal of Endodontics
Ephraim R Rikhotso, Muhammad A Bobat
Traumatic dislocation of the mandibular condyle into the middle cranial fossa is an extremely rare complication of maxillofacial injury. The rarity of this injury has led researchers to propose a set of anatomic features that might explain this injury. These features include a small rounded condylar head, hyper-pneumatization of the temporal bone, a thin roof over the glenoid fossa, and missing posterior teeth. The greatest risk factor for this injury is a blow to the chin when the mouth is open without fracture of the condyle (and therefore no dissipation of the forces)...
July 30, 2016: Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Vanessa Polina Pereira Costa, Marilia Leão Goettems, Elaine Zanchin Baldissera, Andréa Dâmaso Bertoldi, Dione Dias Torriani
This retrospective study aimed at determining the predicted risks of clinical and radiographic complications in primary teeth following traumatic dental injuries, according to injury type, severity and child's age. Data were collected from records of children treated at a Dental Trauma Center in Brazil for nine years. Records of 576 children were included; clinical sequelae were assessed in 774 teeth, and radiographic sequelae, in 566 teeth. A total of 408 teeth (52.7%) had clinical sequelae and 185 teeth (32...
2016: Brazilian Oral Research
Fanny Chmilewsky, Warda Ayaz, James Appiah, Imad About, Seung-Hyuk Chung
Given the importance of sensory innervation in tooth vitality, the identification of signals that control nerve regeneration and the cellular events they induce is essential. Previous studies demonstrated that the complement system, a major component of innate immunity and inflammation, is activated at the injured site of human carious teeth and plays an important role in dental-pulp regeneration via interaction of the active Complement C5a fragment with pulp progenitor cells. In this study, we further determined the role of the active fragment complement C5a receptor (C5aR) in dental nerve regeneration in regards to local secretion of nerve growth factor (NGF) upon carious injury...
2016: Scientific Reports
M Suganya, Vikneshan, Anand Hiremath
AIM & OBJECTIVE: To assess working and trainee nurses' knowledge and awareness regarding the emergency handling of traumatic injuries to the teeth. The research was conducted in four different parts of Karnataka, a state in India. BACKGROUND: Traumatic injuries to teeth and the facial region are common among children and young adults. Most traumatic dental injuries can be avoided, or would be less serious, if an extensive knowledge and awareness of these injuries existed, especially among people who frequently come across them...
August 18, 2016: Journal of Clinical Nursing
Simon Sulser, Dirk Ubmann, Martin Schlaepfer, Martin Brueesch, Georg Goliasch, Burkhardt Seifert, Donat R Spahn, Kurt Ruetzler
BACKGROUND: Airway management in the emergency room can be challenging when patients suffer from life-threatening conditions. Mental stress, ignorance of the patient's medical history, potential cervical injury or immobilisation and the presence of vomit and/or blood may also contribute to a difficult airway. Videolaryngoscopes have been introduced into clinical practice to visualise the airway and ultimately increase the success rate of airway management. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the C-MAC videolaryngoscope improves first-attempt intubation success rate compared with direct laryngoscopy in patients undergoing emergency rapid sequence intubation in the emergency room setting...
August 16, 2016: European Journal of Anaesthesiology
Sanna Koskela, Anni Suomalainen, Satu Apajalahti, Irja Ventä
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyze malpractice claims related to tooth extractions in order to identify areas requiring emphasis and eventually to reduce the number of complications. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We compiled a file of all malpractice claims related to tooth extractions (EBA code) between 1997 and 2010 from the Finnish Patient Insurance Centre. We then examined the data with respect to date, tooth, surgery, injury diagnosis, and the authority's decision on the case...
August 10, 2016: Clinical Oral Investigations
Siew Woh Choo, Mike Rayko, Tze King Tan, Ranjeev Hari, Aleksey Komissarov, Wei Yee Wee, Andrey A Yurchenko, Sergey Kliver, Gaik Tamazian, Agostinho Antunes, Richard K Wilson, Wesley C Warren, Klaus-Peter Koepfli, Patrick Minx, Ksenia Krasheninnikova, Antoinette Kotze, Desire L Dalton, Elaine Vermaak, Ian C Paterson, Pavel Dobrynin, Frankie Thomas Sitam, Jeffrine J Rovie-Ryan, Warren E Johnson, Aini Mohamed Yusoff, Shu-Jin Luo, Kayal Vizi Karuppannan, Gang Fang, Deyou Zheng, Mark B Gerstein, Leonard Lipovich, Stephen J O'Brien, Guat Jah Wong
Pangolins, unique mammals with scales over most of their body, no teeth, poor vision, and an acute olfactory system, comprise the only placental order (Pholidota) without a whole-genome map. To investigate pangolin biology and evolution, we developed genome assemblies of the Malayan (Manis javanica) and Chinese (M. pentadactyla) pangolins. Strikingly, we found that interferon epsilon (IFNE), exclusively expressed in epithelial cells and important in skin and mucosal immunity, is pseudogenized in all African and Asian pangolin species that we examined, perhaps impacting resistance to infection...
October 2016: Genome Research
F C Nicola, L P Rodrigues, T Crestani, K Quintiliano, E F Sanches, S Willborn, D Aristimunha, L Boisserand, P Pranke, C A Netto
Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a disabling condition resulting in deficits of sensory and motor functions, and has no effective treatment. Considering that protocols with stem cell transplantation and treadmill training have shown promising results, the present study evaluated the effectiveness of stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) transplantation combined with treadmill training in rats with experimental spinal cord injury. Fifty-four Wistar rats were spinalized using NYU impactor. The rats were randomly distributed into 5 groups: Sham (laminectomy with no SCI, n=10); SCI (laminectomy followed by SCI, n=12); SHEDs (SCI treated with SHEDs, n=11); TT (SCI treated with treadmill training, n=11); SHEDs+TT (SCI treated with SHEDs and treadmill training; n=10)...
August 8, 2016: Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research, Revista Brasileira de Pesquisas Médicas e Biológicas
Lan Huang, Benjamin Salmon, Xing Yin, Jill A Helms
With the march of time our bodies start to wear out: eyesight fades, skin loses its elasticity, teeth and bones become more brittle and injuries heal more slowly. These universal features of aging can be traced back to our stem cells. Aging has a profound effect on stem cells: DNA mutations naturally accumulate over time and our bodies have evolved highly specialized mechanisms to remove these damaged cells. Whilst obviously beneficial, this repair mechanism also reduces the pool of available stem cells and this, in turn, has a dramatic effect on tissue homeostasis and on our rate of healing...
October 2016: Periodontology 2000
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