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Maggot Debridement Therapy

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28795888/effective-wound-bed-preparation-using-maggot-debridement-therapy-for-patients-with-critical-limb-ischaemia
#1
A Nishijima, M Gosho, R Yoshida, S Yanagibayashi, M Takikawa, J Nishijima, M Sekido, N Yamamoto
OBJECTIVE: Patients with critical limb ischaemia (CLI) lack sufficient blood flow in to the limb, which leads to difficulties in the normal wound healing process. Therefore, maggot debridement therapy (MDT) has not generally been recommended for CLI patients. We evaluated the effectiveness of wound bed preparation by MDT in CLI patients who had undergone mid-foot amputation. METHODS: Patients who underwent mid-foot amputation after angioplasty between April 2014 and October 2016 were retrospectively investigated by classifying them into an MDT group or a conventional treatment group...
August 2, 2017: Journal of Wound Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28599051/maggot-therapy-for-wound-care-in-austere-environments
#2
Ronald A Sherman, Michael R Hetzler
The past 25 years have seen an increase in use of maggot therapy for wound care. Maggot therapy is very effective in wound debridement; it is simple to apply and requires very little in the way of resources, costs, or skilled personnel. These characteristics make it well suited for use in austere environments. The use of medical-grade maggots makes maggot therapy nearly risk free, but medical grade maggots may not always be available, especially in the wilderness or in resource-limited communities. By understanding myiasis and fly biology, it should be possible even for the nonentomologist to obtain maggots from the wild and apply them therapeutically, with minimal risks...
December 0: Journal of Special Operations Medicine: a Peer Reviewed Journal for SOF Medical Professionals
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28570137/benefits-of-maggot-debridement-therapy-on-leg-ulcers-a-literature-review
#3
Genevieve Abela
Maggot debridement therapy (MDT) is an effective method for debriding wounds such as leg ulcers, supporting the concept of wound bed preparation ( Dumville et al, 2009 ; Soares et al, 2009 ; Mudge et al, 2014 ). New evidence is emerging to suggest that maggots might contribute to wound healing in other ways. For example, the reduction of biofilms and disinfection of wounds ( Van Der Plas et al, 2008 ; Brown et al, 2012 ; Pritchard and Brown, 2015 ) plus regulation of protease levels ( Chambers et al, 2003 ; Van Der Plas et al, 2009a ; Van Der Plas et al, 2009b )...
June 2, 2017: British Journal of Community Nursing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28567433/maggot-debridement-therapy-for-a-patient-with-critical-limb-ischaemia-and-severe-cardiac-dysfunction-possibility-of-limb-salvage
#4
Akio Nishijima, Naoto Yamamoto, Ryuichi Yoshida, Koji Hozawa, Satoshi Yanagibayashi, Megumi Takikawa, Rie Hayasaka, Junko Nishijima, Tadasu Okada, Mitsuru Sekido
Ischaemic skin ulcer occurred on the foot of a 73-year-old man who had a history of fulminant myocarditis with severe cardiac dysfunction. We attempted wound bed preparation by maggot debridement therapy and salvaged his limb. It can be one of the adjuvant treatment strategies for critical limb ischaemia.
2017: Case Reports in Plastic Surgery & Hand Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28402593/a-new-method-for-the-production-of-sterile-colonies-of-lucilia-sericata
#5
N E Gasz, M L Harvey
Maggot debridement therapy (MDT) refers to the use of blowfly larvae to clean or debride an infected wound. Most commonly, larvae of Lucilia sericata (Meigen) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) are used, and are sterilized prior to use to ensure no further bacterial infections are introduced during treatment. Current methods sterilize eggs from laboratory-reared blowfly colonies, after which sterile early second instar maggots can be provided to hospitals for use in treatment. Maggots not required for treatment are used for colony regeneration, in which sterility is not maintained...
September 2017: Medical and Veterinary Entomology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28361272/sterilization-of-blow-fly-eggs-chrysomya-megacephala-and-lucilia-cuprina-diptera-calliphoridae-for-maggot-debridement-therapy-application
#6
Kwankamol Limsopatham, Phadungkiat Khamnoi, Kabkaew L Sukontason, Dheerawan Boonyawan, Tarinee Chaiwong, Kom Sukontason
Maggot debridement therapy (MDT) is an application of sterile laboratory-reared blow fly larvae to remove necrotic tissue and disinfect wounds for medical conditions. For effective application, the blow fly larvae used in the wound treatment are required to be in aseptic condition. Here, we report the results of a detailed assessment of bacteria and fungi isolated from the eggs of two blow fly species, Chrysomya megacephala (F.) and Lucilia cuprina (Wiedemann) before and after sterilization by disinfectants Chlorhex-C, povidone-iodine, and sodium hypochlorite...
May 2017: Parasitology Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28277993/maggot-therapy-for-wound-care-in-iran-a-case-series-of-the-first-28-patients
#7
A Mirabzadeh, M J Ladani, B Imani, S A B Rosen, R A Sherman
OBJECTIVE: The need for improved wound care is receiving considerable attention in the Islamic Republic of Iran. Beginning in 2003, maggot therapy (MT) became part of Iran's effort to advance its wound care technology. The first cohort of patients treated with MT was analysed to evaluate the use of this treatment. METHOD: Patients treated with MT at three hospitals in Tehran were analysed retrospectively. Primary outcomes were time to wound debridement and time to wound healing...
March 2, 2017: Journal of Wound Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28235562/urate-oxidase-produced-by-lucilia-sericata-medical-maggots-is-localized-in-malpighian-tubes-and-facilitates-allantoin-production
#8
Andre Baumann, Marisa Skaljac, Rüdiger Lehmann, Andreas Vilcinskas, Zdenӗk Franta
Lucilia sericata maggots are the only species currently approved for maggot debridement therapy (MDT), an alternative treatment for chronic and recalcitrant wounds. Maggots promote wound debridement, disinfection and healing by producing a complex mixture of proteins, peptides and low-molecular-weight compounds in their secretions and excretions, but the individual components are not well characterized at the molecular level. Here we investigated the purine catabolism pathway in L. sericata, focusing on the production of allantoin by Urate Oxidase (UO), which is thought to promote wound healing...
April 2017: Insect Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27792719/-comparative-study-of-the-efficacy-of-larva-therapy-for-debridement-and-control-of-bacterial-burden-compared-to-surgical-debridement-and-topical-application-of-an-antimicrobial
#9
José Contreras-Ruiz, Adán Fuentes-Suárez, Sara Arroyo-Escalante, David Moncada-Barron, María Cristina Sosa-de-Martínez, Ernesto Maravilla-Franco, Judith Guadalupe Domínguez-Cherit
Maggot debridement therapy (MDT) is the use of medical grade maggots of the fly Lucilia sericata for wound debridement. Recent observations show that MDT decreases bacterial burden as well. Venous ulcers are the most commonly seen in wound clinics and require, besides adequate treatment of venous hypertension, proper wound bed preparation with debri dement of necrotic tissue and control of potential infections. To evaluate the efficacy of MDT in venous ulcers a randomized controlled trial was designed to compare MDT to surgical debridement and topical application of silver sulfadiazine (SSD) in 19 patients for 4 weeks...
October 2016: Gaceta Médica de México
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27696133/first-record-of-larval-secretions-of-cochliomyia-macellaria-fabricius-1775-diptera-calliphoridae-inhibiting-the-growth-of-staphylococcus-aureus-and-pseudomonas-aeruginosa
#10
F S Masiero, M F K Aquino, M P Nassu, D I B Pereira, D S Leite, P J Thyssen
Maggot debridement therapy (MDT) consists on the intentional and controlled application of sterilized larvae of the order Diptera on necrotic skin lesions with the purpose of cleaning necrotic tissue and removing pathogenic bacteria. During MDT, a marked antimicrobial activity has been reported in literature specially associated with antibacterial substances from Lucilia sericata (Meigen); however, regarding Cochliomyia macellaria (Fabricius), little is known. This study aimed to evaluate in vitro inhibition of bacterial growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus in contact with excretions and secretions (ES) from C...
February 2017: Neotropical Entomology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27623390/increasing-the-mir-126-expression-in-the-peripheral-blood-of-patients-with-diabetic-foot-ulcers-treated-with-maggot-debridement-therapy
#11
Jie Zhang, Xin-Juan Sun, Jin'an Chen, Zhi Wei Hu, Lei Wang, Dong Mei Gu, Ai-Ping Wang
BACKGROUND: miR-126 may increase angiogenesis in patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) treated with maggot debridement therapy (MDT). METHODS: Real-time quantitative PCR was used to detect expression of miR-126 mRNA in the peripheral blood among the non-diabetic population, type 2 diabetes mellitus patients without DFU, and patients with DFUs of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The expression of miR-126 mRNA in the peripheral blood of patients with DFUs was observed before and after MDT...
January 2017: Journal of Diabetes and its Complications
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27567983/anti-leishmania-activity-of-lucilia-sericata-and-calliphora-vicina-maggots-in-laboratory-models
#12
Alireza Sanei-Dehkordi, Ali Khamesipour, Kamran Akbarzadeh, Amir Ahmad Akhavan, Akram Mir Amin Mohammadi, Younes Mohammadi, Yavar Rassi, Mohammad Ali Oshaghi, Zahra Alebrahim, Seyed Ebrahim Eskandari, Javad Rafinejad
Use of sterile fly larvae (maggots) of blow flies for the treatment of many different types of skin and soft tissue wounds is called Maggot debridement therapy (MDT). The larvae of blow flies secrete a broad spectrum of compounds with diverse mechanisms of action in the gut and salivary glands called excretion/secretion (ES) products which showed to have antimicrobial activities against Gram negative and positive bacteria. Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) which is the common form of leishmaniasis is difficult to treat...
November 2016: Experimental Parasitology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27504426/mystery-behind-non-healing-wound-at-chin-region-myiasis-due-to-neglected-trauma-a-case-report-with-review-of-literature
#13
Pulkit Khandelwal, Neha Hajira
Myiasis is the infestation of human beings with fly larvae which feed on host's living or dead tissue. Diagnosis of this condition is made by the presence of larvae in affected body parts. The standard treatment is the mechanical removal of the maggots from the lesion and management of the general systemic condition. This paper report a case of myiasis at the chin region in a 45-year-old male managed by manual removal of larvae after topical application of turpentine oil, surgical debridement of necrotic tissues and antimicrobial therapy...
June 2016: Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research: JCDR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27396987/viability-of-lucilia-sericata-maggots-after-exposure-to-wound-antiseptics
#14
Georg Daeschlein, Matthias Napp, Ojan Assadian, Sebastian von Podewils, Kevin Reese, Peter Hinz, Johannes Matiasek, Romy Spitzmueller, Paul Humphreys, Michael Jünger, Axel Kramer
After debridement and before dressing a wound with maggots of calliphorid flies, one frequently performed step is the application of antiseptics to the prepared wound bed. However, the concomitant application of antiseptic agents during maggot therapy is regarded controversial as antiseptics may interfere with maggots' viability. In this experimental in vitro study, the viability of fly maggots was investigated after exposure to various antiseptics frequently used in wound care. Here, we show that Lucilia sericata fly maggots can survive up to an hour's exposure to wound antiseptics such as octenidine, povidone-iodine or polihexanide...
June 2017: International Wound Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27390689/safety-effectiveness-and-economic-aspects-of-maggot-debridement-therapy-for-wound-healing
#15
Jalal Arabloo, Serajaddin Grey, Mohammadreza Mobinizadeh, Alireza Olyaeemanesh, Pejman Hamouzadeh, Kiumars Khamisabadi
BACKGROUND: Maggot therapy has recently attracted considerable attention as an emerging debridement technique for wound healing. This study aimed to review the safety, effectiveness and economic evaluations of Maggot Debridement Therapy for wound healing. METHODS: To retrieve the relevant evidences, the Cochrane Library (until September 2014) was searched by appropriate keywords, using free text and Mesh. Systematic reviews, HTA reports and economic evaluation studies that compared larval therapy with other debridement therapies, such as hydrogel in patients with various kinds of ulcers in terms of side effects, the wound healing rate, the healing time, and cost per QALY, were included...
2016: Medical Journal of the Islamic Republic of Iran
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27363059/maggot-debridement-therapy-mdt-it-is-safe-and-economic-for-treating-a-diabetic-foot-ulcer
#16
REVIEW
Ahmed Hassan Fawzi El-Tawdy, Eissa Abdel Hamed Ibrahim, Eman Shokry Abdallah, Eman Mahmoud Aly Al Sakhawy, Tosson A Morsy
Diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) is the major global and devastating complication of diabetes mellitus that affects at least 20% of diabetic patients during their lifetime. This article presents an overview of the research evidence on maggot debridement therapy that serves as a guide to health professionals who may be users of this form of treatment now and in the future. It is a time to apply this sample and safe worldwide approved method for diabetic foot ulcer to save money and avoid surgical intervention.
April 2016: Journal of the Egyptian Society of Parasitology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27349059/-maggot-therapy-case-study-in-home-care
#17
María Dolores Martínez Faura, Maite Franco Romero, Carmen Ordoño Martínez, Mónica E García Mallo
INTRODUCTION: Maggot therapy is a wound bed preparation method of ancestral use. Its use was relegated with the emergence of antibiotics, until today, where is reemerging as an option in the treatment of chronic wounds. METHODOLOGY: We report a case study where a six months wound in diabetic foot with torpid evolution and with several changes of ineffective treatment, improved in 3-4 days after the use of maggot therapy at home; leaving the wound bed prepared for the process of granulation...
April 2016: Revista de Enfermería
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27182137/maggot-debridement-therapy-as-primary-tool-to-treat-chronic-wound-of-animals
#18
REVIEW
Vijayata Choudhary, Mukesh Choudhary, Sunanda Pandey, Vandip D Chauhan, J J Hasnani
Maggot debridement therapy (MDT) is a safe, effective, and controlled method ofhealing of chronic wounds by debridement and disinfection. In this therapy live, sterile maggots of green bottle fly, Lucilia (Phaenicia) sericata are used, as they prefernecrotic tissues over healthy for feeding. Since centuries, MDT is used in humanbeings to treat chronic wounds. Lately, MDT came out as a potent medical aid in animals. In animals, although, this therapy is still limited and clinical studies are few. However, with the increasing antibiotic resistance and chronic wound infections in veterinary medicine, maggot therapy may even become the first line of treatment for some infections...
April 2016: Veterinary World
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27041484/methods-for-external-disinfection-of-blow-fly-diptera-calliphoridae-eggs-prior-to-use-in-wound-debridement-therapy
#19
Adrienne L Brundage, Tawni L Crippen, Jeffery K Tomberlin
Maggot debridement therapy (MDT) is the use of the larval stage of flies (i.e., Calliphoridae) to remove necrotic tissue and disinfect wounds. Effective MDT requires aseptic technique to prevent the unintentional introduction of pathogenic bacteria into a wound to be debrided; yet the external surface of Calliphoridae eggs is often heavily contaminated with bacteria. Studies of external disinfection of dipteran eggs have been reported, but neither their efficacy nor effect on egg viability has been adequately assessed...
March 2016: Wound Repair and Regeneration
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27006073/towards-next-generation-maggot-debridement-therapy-transgenic-lucilia-sericata-larvae-that-produce-and-secrete-a-human-growth-factor
#20
Rebecca J Linger, Esther J Belikoff, Ying Yan, Fang Li, Holly A Wantuch, Helen L Fitzsimons, Maxwell J Scott
BACKGROUND: Diabetes and its concurrent complications impact a significant proportion of the population of the US and create a large financial burden on the American health care system. FDA-approved maggot debridement therapy (MDT), the application of sterile laboratory-reared Lucilia sericata (green bottle fly) larvae to wounds, is a cost-effective and successful treatment for diabetic foot ulcers and other medical conditions. Human platelet derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) is a secreted dimeric peptide growth factor that binds the PDGF receptor...
2016: BMC Biotechnology
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