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Maggot Debridement Therapy

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27792719/-comparative-study-of-the-efficacy-of-larva-therapy-for-debridement-and-control-of-bacterial-burden-compared-to-surgical-debridement-and-topical-application-of-an-antimicrobial
#1
José Contreras-Ruiz, Adán Fuentes-Suárez, Sara Arroyo-Escalante, David Moncada-Barron, María Cristina Sosa-de-Martínez, Ernesto Maravilla-Franco, Judith Guadalupe Domínguez-Cherit
Maggot debridement therapy (MDT) is the use of medical grade maggots of the fly Lucilia sericata for wound debridement. Recent observations show that MDT decreases bacterial burden as well. Venous ulcers are the most commonly seen in wound clinics and require, besides adequate treatment of venous hypertension, proper wound bed preparation with debri dement of necrotic tissue and control of potential infections. To evaluate the efficacy of MDT in venous ulcers a randomized controlled trial was designed to compare MDT to surgical debridement and topical application of silver sulfadiazine (SSD) in 19 patients for 4 weeks...
October 2016: Gaceta Médica de México
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27696133/first-record-of-larval-secretions-of-cochliomyia-macellaria-fabricius-1775-diptera-calliphoridae-inhibiting-the-growth-of-staphylococcus-aureus-and-pseudomonas-aeruginosa
#2
F S Masiero, M F K Aquino, M P Nassu, D I B Pereira, D S Leite, P J Thyssen
Maggot debridement therapy (MDT) consists on the intentional and controlled application of sterilized larvae of the order Diptera on necrotic skin lesions with the purpose of cleaning necrotic tissue and removing pathogenic bacteria. During MDT, a marked antimicrobial activity has been reported in literature specially associated with antibacterial substances from Lucilia sericata (Meigen); however, regarding Cochliomyia macellaria (Fabricius), little is known. This study aimed to evaluate in vitro inhibition of bacterial growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus in contact with excretions and secretions (ES) from C...
October 1, 2016: Neotropical Entomology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27623390/increasing-the-mir-126-expression-in-the-peripheral-blood-of-patients-with-diabetic-foot-ulcers-treated-with-maggot-debridement-therapy
#3
Jie Zhang, Xin-Juan Sun, Jin'an Chen, Zhi Wei Hu, Lei Wang, Dong Mei Gu, Ai-Ping Wang
BACKGROUND: miR-126 may increase angiogenesis in patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) treated with maggot debridement therapy (MDT). METHODS: Real-time quantitative PCR was used to detect expression of miR-126 mRNA in the peripheral blood among the non-diabetic population, type 2 diabetes mellitus patients without DFU, and patients with DFUs of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The expression of miR-126 mRNA in the peripheral blood of patients with DFUs was observed before and after MDT...
July 28, 2016: Journal of Diabetes and its Complications
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27567983/anti-leishmania-activity-of-lucilia-sericata-and-calliphora-vicina-maggots-in-laboratory-models
#4
Alireza Sanei-Dehkordi, Ali Khamesipour, Kamran Akbarzadeh, Amir Ahmad Akhavan, Akram Mir Amin Mohammadi, Younes Mohammadi, Yavar Rassi, Mohammad Ali Oshaghi, Zahra Alebrahim, Seyed Ebrahim Eskandari, Javad Rafinejad
Use of sterile fly larvae (maggots) of blow flies for the treatment of many different types of skin and soft tissue wounds is called Maggot debridement therapy (MDT). The larvae of blow flies secrete a broad spectrum of compounds with diverse mechanisms of action in the gut and salivary glands called excretion/secretion (ES) products which showed to have antimicrobial activities against Gram negative and positive bacteria. Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) which is the common form of leishmaniasis is difficult to treat...
August 24, 2016: Experimental Parasitology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27504426/mystery-behind-non-healing-wound-at-chin-region-myiasis-due-to-neglected-trauma-a-case-report-with-review-of-literature
#5
Pulkit Khandelwal, Neha Hajira
Myiasis is the infestation of human beings with fly larvae which feed on host's living or dead tissue. Diagnosis of this condition is made by the presence of larvae in affected body parts. The standard treatment is the mechanical removal of the maggots from the lesion and management of the general systemic condition. This paper report a case of myiasis at the chin region in a 45-year-old male managed by manual removal of larvae after topical application of turpentine oil, surgical debridement of necrotic tissues and antimicrobial therapy...
June 2016: Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research: JCDR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27396987/viability-of-lucilia-sericata-maggots-after-exposure-to-wound-antiseptics
#6
Georg Daeschlein, Matthias Napp, Ojan Assadian, Sebastian von Podewils, Kevin Reese, Peter Hinz, Johannes Matiasek, Romy Spitzmueller, Paul Humphreys, Michael Jünger, Axel Kramer
After debridement and before dressing a wound with maggots of calliphorid flies, one frequently performed step is the application of antiseptics to the prepared wound bed. However, the concomitant application of antiseptic agents during maggot therapy is regarded controversial as antiseptics may interfere with maggots' viability. In this experimental in vitro study, the viability of fly maggots was investigated after exposure to various antiseptics frequently used in wound care. Here, we show that Lucilia sericata fly maggots can survive up to an hour's exposure to wound antiseptics such as octenidine, povidone-iodine or polihexanide...
July 11, 2016: International Wound Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27390689/safety-effectiveness-and-economic-aspects-of-maggot-debridement-therapy-for-wound-healing
#7
Jalal Arabloo, Serajaddin Grey, Mohammadreza Mobinizadeh, Alireza Olyaeemanesh, Pejman Hamouzadeh, Kiumars Khamisabadi
BACKGROUND: Maggot therapy has recently attracted considerable attention as an emerging debridement technique for wound healing. This study aimed to review the safety, effectiveness and economic evaluations of Maggot Debridement Therapy for wound healing. METHODS: To retrieve the relevant evidences, the Cochrane Library (until September 2014) was searched by appropriate keywords, using free text and Mesh. Systematic reviews, HTA reports and economic evaluation studies that compared larval therapy with other debridement therapies, such as hydrogel in patients with various kinds of ulcers in terms of side effects, the wound healing rate, the healing time, and cost per QALY, were included...
2016: Medical Journal of the Islamic Republic of Iran
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27363059/maggot-debridement-therapy-mdt-it-is-safe-and-economic-for-treating-a-diabetic-foot-ulcer
#8
REVIEW
Ahmed Hassan Fawzi El-Tawdy, Eissa Abdel Hamed Ibrahim, Eman Shokry Abdallah, Eman Mahmoud Aly Al Sakhawy, Tosson A Morsy
Diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) is the major global and devastating complication of diabetes mellitus that affects at least 20% of diabetic patients during their lifetime. This article presents an overview of the research evidence on maggot debridement therapy that serves as a guide to health professionals who may be users of this form of treatment now and in the future. It is a time to apply this sample and safe worldwide approved method for diabetic foot ulcer to save money and avoid surgical intervention.
April 2016: Journal of the Egyptian Society of Parasitology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27349059/-maggot-therapy-case-study-in-home-care
#9
María Dolores Martínez Faura, Maite Franco Romero, Carmen Ordoño Martínez, Mónica E García Mallo
INTRODUCTION: Maggot therapy is a wound bed preparation method of ancestral use. Its use was relegated with the emergence of antibiotics, until today, where is reemerging as an option in the treatment of chronic wounds. METHODOLOGY: We report a case study where a six months wound in diabetic foot with torpid evolution and with several changes of ineffective treatment, improved in 3-4 days after the use of maggot therapy at home; leaving the wound bed prepared for the process of granulation...
April 2016: Revista de Enfermería
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27182137/maggot-debridement-therapy-as-primary-tool-to-treat-chronic-wound-of-animals
#10
REVIEW
Vijayata Choudhary, Mukesh Choudhary, Sunanda Pandey, Vandip D Chauhan, J J Hasnani
Maggot debridement therapy (MDT) is a safe, effective, and controlled method ofhealing of chronic wounds by debridement and disinfection. In this therapy live, sterile maggots of green bottle fly, Lucilia (Phaenicia) sericata are used, as they prefernecrotic tissues over healthy for feeding. Since centuries, MDT is used in humanbeings to treat chronic wounds. Lately, MDT came out as a potent medical aid in animals. In animals, although, this therapy is still limited and clinical studies are few. However, with the increasing antibiotic resistance and chronic wound infections in veterinary medicine, maggot therapy may even become the first line of treatment for some infections...
April 2016: Veterinary World
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27041484/methods-for-external-disinfection-of-blow-fly-diptera-calliphoridae-eggs-prior-to-use-in-wound-debridement-therapy
#11
Adrienne L Brundage, Tawni L Crippen, Jeffery K Tomberlin
Maggot debridement therapy (MDT) is the use of the larval stage of flies (i.e., Calliphoridae) to remove necrotic tissue and disinfect wounds. Effective MDT requires aseptic technique to prevent the unintentional introduction of pathogenic bacteria into a wound to be debrided; yet the external surface of Calliphoridae eggs is often heavily contaminated with bacteria. Studies of external disinfection of dipteran eggs have been reported, but neither their efficacy nor effect on egg viability has been adequately assessed...
March 2016: Wound Repair and Regeneration
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27006073/towards-next-generation-maggot-debridement-therapy-transgenic-lucilia-sericata-larvae-that-produce-and-secrete-a-human-growth-factor
#12
Rebecca J Linger, Esther J Belikoff, Ying Yan, Fang Li, Holly A Wantuch, Helen L Fitzsimons, Maxwell J Scott
BACKGROUND: Diabetes and its concurrent complications impact a significant proportion of the population of the US and create a large financial burden on the American health care system. FDA-approved maggot debridement therapy (MDT), the application of sterile laboratory-reared Lucilia sericata (green bottle fly) larvae to wounds, is a cost-effective and successful treatment for diabetic foot ulcers and other medical conditions. Human platelet derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) is a secreted dimeric peptide growth factor that binds the PDGF receptor...
2016: BMC Biotechnology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26976407/evaluation-of-conventional-therapeutic-methods-versus-maggot-therapy-in-the-evolution-of-healing-of-tegumental-injuries-in-wistar-rats-with-and-without-diabetes-mellitus
#13
Franciéle Souza Masiero, Patricia Jacqueline Thyssen
Larval therapy consists on the application of sterilized carrion flies larvae, reared in laboratory, on acute, chronic, and/or infected wounds in order to promote healing. Conventional methods for treating injuries include mechanical debridement or silver-based dressings; however, they are not always effective for wound healing. Larval therapy is a feasible and safe treatment for therapeutic application and, in many cases, the only and the most recommended alternative for difficult healing injuries. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the competence of Cochliomyia macellaria F...
June 2016: Parasitology Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26863704/maggot-debridement-therapy-advancing-to-the-past-in-wound-care
#14
Kelsey Klaus, Cynthia Steinwedel
Maggot debridement therapy (MDT) is experiencing resurgence as an effective alternative to conventional mechanical debridement in nonhealing wounds, especially those with antibiotic-resistant organisms. MDT has antibiotic, antifungal, and anti-inflammatory properties. Military use is on the rise.
November 2015: Medsurg Nursing: Official Journal of the Academy of Medical-Surgical Nurses
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26782021/maggot-debridement-therapy-promotes-diabetic-foot-wound-healing-by-up-regulating-endothelial-cell-activity
#15
Xinjuan Sun, Jin'an Chen, Jie Zhang, Wei Wang, Jinshan Sun, Aiping Wang
To determine the role of maggot debridement therapy (MDT) on diabetic foot wound healing, we compared growth related factors in wounds before and after treatment. Furthermore, we utilized human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to explore responses to maggot excretions/secretions on markers of angiogenesis and proliferation. The results showed that there was neo-granulation and angiogenesis in diabetic foot wounds after MDT. Moreover, significant elevation in CD34 and CD68 levels was also observed in treated wounds...
March 2016: Journal of Diabetes and its Complications
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26773746/a-jonah-like-chymotrypsin-from-the-therapeutic-maggot-lucilia-sericata-plays-a-role-in-wound-debridement-and-coagulation
#16
Anne-Kathrin Pöppel, Mareike Kahl, Andre Baumann, Jochen Wiesner, Anke Gökçen, Annika Beckert, Klaus T Preissner, Andreas Vilcinskas, Zdeněk Franta
Lucilia sericata larvae are used in maggot debridement therapy, a traditional wound healing approach that has recently been approved for the treatment of chronic wounds. Maggot excretion products (MEP) contain many different proteases that promote disinfection, debridement and the acceleration of wound healing, e.g. by activating the host contact phase/intrinsic pathway of coagulation. In order to characterise relevant procoagulant proteases, we analysed MEP and identified a chymotrypsin-like serine protease with similarities to Jonah proteases from Drosophila melanogaster and a chymotrypsin from Lucilia cuprina...
March 2016: Insect Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26691053/does-maggot-therapy-promote-wound-healing-the-clinical-and-cellular-evidence
#17
REVIEW
Y Nigam, C Morgan
The larvae of Lucillia sericata, or maggots of the green-bottle fly, are used worldwide to help debride chronic, necrotic and infected wounds. Whilst there is abundant clinical and scientific evidence to support the role of maggots for debriding and disinfecting wounds, not so much emphasis has been placed on their role in stimulating wound healing. However, there is accumulating evidence to suggest that maggots and their externalized secretions may also promote wound healing in stubborn, recalcitrant chronic ulcers...
May 2016: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology: JEADV
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26648417/maggot-debridement-therapy-in-disaster-medicine
#18
Frank Stadler, Ramon Z Shaban, Peter Tatham
BACKGROUND: When disaster strikes, the number of patients requiring treatment can be overwhelming. In low-income countries, resources to assist the injured in a timely fashion may be limited. As a consequence, necrosis and wound infection in disaster patients is common and frequently leads to adverse health outcomes such as amputations, chronic wounds, and loss of life. In such compromised health care environments, low-tech and cheap wound care options are required that are in ready supply, easy to use, and have multiple therapeutic benefits...
February 2016: Prehospital and Disaster Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26621165/maggot-therapy-in-treatment-of-a-complex-hand-injury-complicated-by-mycotic-infection
#19
M Bohac, M Cambal, R Zamborsky, P Takac, J Fedeles
Complex injuries of the hand remain a therapeutic challenge for surgeons. We present the case of a male who suffered a devastating injury of the hand caused by a conveyor belt. The patient developed a progressive Absidia corymbifera infection of the affected soft tissues. Initial treatments with serial surgical debridement and topical and intravenous itraconazole were unsuccessful in eliminating the infection. We decided to use maggot debridement therapy in a new special design to debride all necrotic, devitalized tissue and preserve only healthy tissue and functioning structures...
2015: Bratislavské Lekárske Listy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26382290/growth-and-survival-of-blowfly-lucilia-sericata-larvae-under-simulated-wound-conditions-implications-for-maggot-debridement-therapy
#20
H Čičková, M Kozánek, P Takáč
Maggot debridement therapy has become a well-established method of wound debridement. Despite its success, little information is available about the optimum duration of the treatment cycle and larval growth in wounds. This study examines the development of Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Calliphoridae) larvae under two containment conditions (bagged and free range) under simulated wound conditions and assesses the impact of transport and further storage of larvae on their survival and growth. There was no significant difference in size between bagged and free-range larvae over the 72-h experimental period...
December 2015: Medical and Veterinary Entomology
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