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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29773777/seeking-biomarkers-of-early-childhood-malnutrition-s-long-term-effects
#1
Pedro A Valdés-Sosa, Janina R Galler, Cyralene P Bryce, Arielle G Rabinowitz, María L Bringas-Vega, Nibaldo Hernández-Mesa, Alberto Taboada-Crispi
Protein-energy malnutrition affects one in nine people worldwide and is most prevalent among children aged less than five years in low-income countries. Early childhood malnutrition can have damaging neurodevelopmental effects, with significant increases in cognitive, neurological and mental health problems over the lifespan, outcomes which can also extend to the next generation. This article describes a research collaboration involving scientists from five centers in Barbados, China, Cuba and the USA. It builds on longer-term joint work between the Barbados Nutrition Study (which, over a 45-year span, has extensively documented nutritional, health, behavioral, social and economic outcomes of individuals who experienced protein-energy malnutrition in the first year of life and healthy controls from the same classrooms and neighborhoods) and the Cuban Neuroscience Center (which has developed low-cost brain imaging methods that can be readily used in low income settings to identify biomarkers for early detection and treatment of adverse consequences of childhood malnutrition)...
April 2018: MEDICC Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29771877/cholera-epidemic-lusaka-zambia-october-2017-may-2018
#2
Nyambe Sinyange, Joan M Brunkard, Nathan Kapata, Mazyanga Lucy Mazaba, Kunda G Musonda, Raymond Hamoonga, Muzala Kapina, Fred Kapaya, Lwito Mutale, Ernest Kateule, Francis Nanzaluka, James Zulu, Chileshe Lukwesa Musyani, Alison V Winstead, William W Davis, Hammad S N'cho, Nelia L Mulambya, Patrick Sakubita, Orbie Chewe, Sulani Nyimbili, Ezinne V C Onwuekwe, Nedghie Adrien, Anna J Blackstock, Travis W Brown, Gordana Derado, Nancy Garrett, Sunkyung Kim, Sydney Hubbard, Amy M Kahler, Warren Malambo, Eric Mintz, Jennifer Murphy, Rupa Narra, Gouthami G Rao, Margaret A Riggs, Nicole Weber, Ellen Yard, Khozya D Zyambo, Nathan Bakyaita, Namani Monze, Kennedy Malama, Jabbin Mulwanda, Victor M Mukonka
On October 6, 2017, an outbreak of cholera was declared in Zambia after laboratory confirmation of Vibrio cholerae O1, biotype El Tor, serotype Ogawa, from stool specimens from two patients with acute watery diarrhea. The two patients had gone to a clinic in Lusaka, the capital city, on October 4. Cholera cases increased rapidly, from several hundred cases in early December 2017 to approximately 2,000 by early January 2018 (Figure). In collaboration with partners, the Zambia Ministry of Health (MoH) launched a multifaceted public health response that included increased chlorination of the Lusaka municipal water supply, provision of emergency water supplies, water quality monitoring and testing, enhanced surveillance, epidemiologic investigations, a cholera vaccination campaign, aggressive case management and health care worker training, and laboratory testing of clinical samples...
May 18, 2018: MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29771373/neighborhood-social-cohesion-and-sleep-outcomes-in-the-native-hawaiian-and-pacific-islander-national-health-interview-survey
#3
Marielle C Young, Monica W Gerber, Tayla Ash, Christine M Horan, Elsie M Taveras
Study Objective: Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders (NHPIs) have the lowest attainment of healthy sleep duration among all racial and ethnic groups in the United States. We examined associations of neighborhood social cohesion with sleep duration and quality. Methods: Cross-sectional analysis of 2,464 adults in the NHPI National Health Interview Survey (2014). Neighborhood social cohesion was categorized as a continuous and categorical variable into low (<12), medium (12-14) and high (>15) according to tertiles of the distribution of responses...
May 16, 2018: Sleep
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29765008/housing-assistance-and-child-health-a-systematic-review
#4
REVIEW
Natalie Slopen, Andrew Fenelon, Sandra Newman, Michel Boudreaux
CONTEXT: Given a large and consistent literature revealing a link between housing and health, publicly supported housing assistance programs might play an important role in promoting the health of disadvantaged children. OBJECTIVE: To summarize and evaluate research in which authors examine housing assistance and child health. DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Web of Science, PsycInfo, and PAIS (1990-2017). STUDY SELECTION: Eligible studies were required to contain assessments of public housing, multifamily housing, or vouchers in relation to a health outcome in children (ages 0-21); we excluded neighborhood mobility interventions...
May 15, 2018: Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29764767/a-systematic-review-of-mobile-produce-markets-facilitators-and-barriers-to-use-and-associations-with-reported-fruit-and-vegetable-intake
#5
Bi-Sek Hsiao, Lindiwe Sibeko, Lisa M Troy
BACKGROUND: Diet-related chronic diseases are a major public health burden. There is growing awareness that disparities in healthful food access contribute to disparities in health. Mobile produce markets (MPMs) have emerged as a strategy to improve fruit and vegetable access and consumption, particularly among low-income, minority, and other vulnerable populations (eg, older adults and children) in food desert neighborhoods. OBJECTIVE: This review examined research on MPMs in the United States and specifically aimed to assess the relationship between MPM use and fruit and/or vegetable intake, and facilitators and barriers related to MPM use within a social ecological framework...
May 12, 2018: Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29762649/residential-racial-isolation-and-spatial-patterning-of-type-2-diabetes-mellitus-in-durham-north-carolina
#6
Mercedes A Bravo, Rebecca Anthopolos, Rachel T Kimbro, Marie Lynn Miranda
Neighborhood characteristics such as racial segregation may be associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus, but studies have not examined these relationships using spatial models appropriate for geographically patterned health outcomes. We construct a local, spatial index of racial isolation (RI) for blacks, which measures the extent to which blacks are exposed to only one another, to estimate associations of diabetes with RI and examine how RI relates to spatial patterning in diabetes. We obtained 2007-2011 electronic health records from the Duke Medicine Enterprise Data Warehouse...
May 14, 2018: American Journal of Epidemiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29762473/zika-virus-and-the-risk-for-renter-households
#7
Amanda Scarbrough, Heranga Rathnasekara, Melinda Holt, Jack Hill, Ram Kafle
Recent research on family income indicates that a lack of economic stability can affect healthy housing. Those with limited resources experience higher rates of inadequate and unstable housing many times forcing them to live in undesirable communities in which there can be several community-level health-related issues. One community-level health-related factor of concern has been the reemergence of Zika virus. Some research has indicated that a higher risk of catching Zika virus may exist in neighborhoods and areas with unhealthy housing...
May 15, 2018: Diseases (Basel)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29760227/socioeconomic-status-and-cardiovascular-outcomes-challenges-and-interventions
#8
REVIEW
William M Schultz, Heval M Kelli, John C Lisko, Tina Varghese, Jia Shen, Pratik Sandesara, Arshed A Quyyumi, Herman A Taylor, Martha Gulati, John G Harold, Jennifer H Mieres, Keith C Ferdinand, George A Mensah, Laurence S Sperling
Socioeconomic status (SES) has a measurable and significant effect on cardiovascular health. Biological, behavioral, and psychosocial risk factors prevalent in disadvantaged individuals accentuate the link between SES and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Four measures have been consistently associated with CVD in high-income countries: income level, educational attainment, employment status, and neighborhood socioeconomic factors. In addition, disparities based on sex have been shown in several studies. Interventions targeting patients with low SES have predominantly focused on modification of traditional CVD risk factors...
May 15, 2018: Circulation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29759065/high-resolution-mapping-of-traffic-related-air-pollution-with-google-street-view-cars-and-incidence-of-cardiovascular-events-within-neighborhoods-in-oakland-ca
#9
Stacey E Alexeeff, Ananya Roy, Jun Shan, Xi Liu, Kyle Messier, Joshua S Apte, Christopher Portier, Stephen Sidney, Stephen K Van Den Eeden
BACKGROUND: Some studies have linked long-term exposure to traffic related air pollutants (TRAP) with adverse cardiovascular health outcomes; however, previous studies have not linked highly variable concentrations of TRAP measured at street-level within neighborhoods to cardiovascular health outcomes. METHODS: Long-term pollutant concentrations for nitrogen dioxide [NO2 ], nitric oxide [NO], and black carbon [BC] were obtained by street-level mobile monitoring on 30 m road segments and linked to residential addresses of 41,869 adults living in Oakland during 2010 to 2015...
May 15, 2018: Environmental Health: a Global Access Science Source
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29758475/social-isolation-and-loneliness-in-later-life-a-parallel-convergent-mixed-methods-case-study-of-older-adults-and-their-residential-contexts-in-the-minneapolis-metropolitan-area-usa
#10
Jessica M Finlay, Lindsay C Kobayashi
Social isolation and loneliness are increasingly prevalent among older adults in the United States, with implications for morbidity and mortality risk. Little research to date has examined the complex person-place transactions that contribute to social well-being in later life. This study aimed to characterize personal and neighborhood contextual influences on social isolation and loneliness among older adults. Interviews were conducted with independent-dwelling men and women (n = 124; mean age 71 years) in the Minneapolis metropolitan area (USA) from June to October, 2015...
May 4, 2018: Social Science & Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29757941/exploring-how-the-home-environment-influences-eating-and-physical-activity-habits-of-low-income-latino-children-of-predominantly-immigrant-families-a-qualitative-study
#11
Ana Cristina Lindsay, Sherrie F Wallington, Faith D Lees, Mary L Greaney
Latinos are the largest and fastest growing minority population group in the United States, and children in low-income Latino families are at elevated risk of becoming overweight or having obesity. A child&rsquo;s home is an important social environment in which he/she develops and maintains dietary and physical activity (PA) habits that ultimately impact weight status. Previous research suggests the parents are central to creating a home environment that facilitates or hinders the development of children&rsquo;s early healthy eating and PA habits...
May 14, 2018: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29755610/the-living-conditions-of-children-with-shared-residence-the-swedish-example
#12
Emma Fransson, Sara Brolin Låftman, Viveca Östberg, Anders Hjern, Malin Bergström
Among children with separated parents, shared residence - i.e., joint physical custody where the child is sharing his or her time equally between two custodial parents' homes - is increasing in many Western countries and is particularly common in Sweden. The overall level of living among children in Sweden is high; however, the potential structural differences between children in various post-separation family arrangements have not been sufficiently studied. Potential risks for children with shared residence relate to the daily hassles and stress when having two homes...
2018: Child Indicators Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29755057/processes-and-outcomes-of-a-community-based-participatory-research-driven-health-needs-assessment-a-tool-for-moving-health-disparity-reporting-to-evidence-based-action
#13
Tabia Henry Akintobi, Elise Lockamy, Lisa Goodin, Natalie D Hernandez, Tanesha Slocumb, Daniel Blumenthal, Ronald Braithwaite, Larry Leeks, Micah Rowland, Thomas Cotton, LaShawn Hoffman
BACKGROUND: The community-based participatory research (CBPR)-driven health needs assessment was a tool used to inform community-led, -implemented, and -sustained research and prevention strategies. METHODS: The Morehouse School of Medicine Prevention Research Center (MSM PRC) research and prevention initiatives are implemented in direct response to priorities identified through this process and tool. Led by a community-majority coalition board, the assessment coupled state and city secondary data with primary survey data collected by and from community residents...
2018: Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29755051/investing-in-gulfport-development-of-an-academic-community-partnership-to-address-health-disparities
#14
Danielle Fastring, Susan Mayfield-Johnson, Tanya Funchess, Julie Egressy, Greg Wilson
BACKGROUND: Invest Health, a collaboration between the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and The Reinvestment Fund, selected 50 midsized cities to participate in a health initiative that encourages cross-sector alliances to think creatively about mechanisms that address barriers to reducing health disparities among low-income populations. Gulfport, Mississippi, was 1 of 50 teams chosen to participate. OBJECTIVE: To develop an academic-community partnership among the University of Southern Mississippi, Coastal Family Health Center (CFHC), Mercy Housing and Human Development (MHHD), the Mississippi State Department of Health Office of Health Disparity Elimination, and Gulfport residents to create the Healthy Gulfport Initiative, and, ultimately, the Gulf Coast Healthy Communities Collaborative (GCHCC)...
2018: Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29752809/exploring-the-relationship-between-adverse-childhood-experiences-and-oral-health-related-quality-of-life
#15
Faizan Kabani, Kristine Lykens, Hyo Jung Tak
OBJECTIVES: Evidence indicates that adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) have destructive impacts on quality of life, health outcomes, and health-care expenditures. Studies further demonstrate a dose-response relationship between the number of ACEs and risk for experiencing chronic illness, such as oral diseases later in life. Research is scarce on the prioritization of contextualized public health interventions addressing this important threat. METHODS: Cross-sectional data from 2011 to 2012 National Survey of Children's Health (NSCH) provided a nationally representative sample of children in the United States, ages 1-17 for dentate status (n = 61,530)...
May 12, 2018: Journal of Public Health Dentistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29752159/predictors-of-falls-and-fractures-leading-to-hospitalization-in-people-with-dementia-a-representative-cohort-study
#16
Shalini Sharma, Christoph Mueller, Robert Stewart, Nicola Veronese, Davy Vancampfort, Ai Koyanagi, Sarah E Lamb, Gayan Perera, Brendon Stubbs
OBJECTIVES: Investigate predictors of falls and fractures leading to hospitalization in a large cohort of people with dementia. DESIGN: A retrospective cohort study. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: People with diagnosed dementia between January 2007 and March 2013, aged >65 years, were assembled using data from the Maudsley Biomedical Research Centre Case Register, from 4 boroughs in London serving a population of 1.3 million people. MEASURES: Falls and/or fractures leading to hospitalization were ascertained from linked national records...
May 2, 2018: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29750893/disparities-in-initiation-of-direct-acting-antiviral-agents-for-hepatitis-c-virus-infection-in-an-insured-population
#17
Julia L Marcus, Leo B Hurley, Scott Chamberland, Jamila H Champsi, Laura C Gittleman, Daniel G Korn, Jennifer B Lai, Jennifer O Lam, Mary Pat Pauly, Charles P Quesenberry, Joanna Ready, Varun Saxena, Suk I Seo, David J Witt, Michael J Silverberg
OBJECTIVES: The cost of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection may contribute to treatment disparities. However, few data exist on factors associated with DAA initiation. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of HCV-infected Kaiser Permanente Northern California members aged ≥18 during October 2014 to December 2016, using Poisson regression models to evaluate demographic, behavioral, and clinical factors associated with DAA initiation...
January 1, 2018: Public Health Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29746552/the-impact-of-being-bullied-at-school-on-psychological-distress-and-work-engagement-in-a-community-sample-of-adult-workers-in-japan
#18
Mai Iwanaga, Kotaro Imamura, Akihito Shimazu, Norito Kawakami
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the long-term impact of being bullied at school on current psychological distress and work engagement in adulthood among Japanese workers. We hypothesized that workers who had been bullied at school could have higher psychological distress and lower work engagement compared to those who had not been bullied. METHODS: We used data from the Japanese Study on Stratification, Health, Income, and Neighborhood (J-SHINE) project, conducted from July 2010 to February 2011 in Japan...
2018: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29744823/incorporating-neighborhood-choice-in-a-model-of-neighborhood-effects-on-income
#19
Maarten van Ham, Sanne Boschman, Matt Vogel
Studies of neighborhood effects often attempt to identify causal effects of neighborhood characteristics on individual outcomes, such as income, education, employment, and health. However, selection looms large in this line of research, and it has been argued that estimates of neighborhood effects are biased because people nonrandomly select into neighborhoods based on their preferences, income, and the availability of alternative housing. We propose a two-step framework to disentangle selection processes in the relationship between neighborhood deprivation and earnings...
May 9, 2018: Demography
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29743218/living-in-cold-spot-communities-is-associated-with-poor-health-and-health-quality
#20
Winston Liaw, Alex H Krist, Sebastian T Tong, Roy Sabo, Camille Hochheimer, Jennifer Rankin, David Grolling, Jene Grandmont, Andrew W Bazemore
PURPOSE: Little is known about incorporating community data into clinical care. This study sought to understand the clinical associations of cold spots (census tracts with worse income, education, and composite deprivation). METHODS: Across 12 practices, we assessed the relationship between cold spots and clinical outcomes (obesity, uncontrolled diabetes, pneumonia vaccination, cancer screening-colon, cervical, and prostate-and aspirin chemoprophylaxis) for 152,962 patients...
May 2018: Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine: JABFM
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