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Neighborhood health

Dayna A Johnson, Jana A Hirsch, Kari A Moore, Susan Redline, Ana V Diez Roux
Although dense neighborhood built environments support increased physical activity and lower obesity, these features may also disturb sleep. Therefore, we sought to understand the association between the built environment and objectively measured sleep. From 2010 to 2013, we analyzed data from examination 5 of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, a diverse population from 6 US cities. We fit multilevel models that assessed the association between the built environment (Street Smart Walk Score, social engagement destinations, street intersections, and population density) and sleep duration or efficiency from 1-week wrist actigraphy in 1,889 individuals...
March 14, 2018: American Journal of Epidemiology
Erika Obikane, Tomohiro Shinozaki, Daisuke Takagi, Norito Kawakami
BACKGROUND: Childhood abuse is associated with adult suicidal behaviors, partially mediated by mental disorders. However, the direct effect of childhood abuse not mediated by mental disorders is uncertain because the same risk factors serve as mediators and confounders of mental disorders and suicidal behaviors. The aim of the study was to estimate the direct effect of childhood abuse not mediated by mental disorders on suicidal behaviors using marginal structural models. METHODS: We used cross-sectional data of Japanese adults in Tokyo and neighboring prefectures (The Japanese Study on Stratification, Health, Income, and Neighborhood)...
February 22, 2018: Journal of Affective Disorders
Kimberly Coughlin, R David Hayward, Mary Fessler, Elango Edhayan
OBJECTIVES: Although individual socioeconomic status has been linked with risk of traumatic injury, there has been relatively little research into the question of how economic changes may impact trauma admission rates in neighborhoods with different socioeconomic backgrounds. METHODS: This study pairs ZIP code-level data on trauma admissions with county-level data on unemployment to assess differences in the type of changes experienced in more and less affluent neighborhoods of the Detroit metropolitan area between 2006 and 2014...
March 15, 2018: International Journal of Public Health
Elizabeth A McConnell, Patrick Janulis, Gregory Phillips, Roky Truong, Michelle Birkett
Minority stress theory has widespread research support in explaining health disparities experienced by sexual and gender minorities. However, less is known about how minority stress impacts multiply marginalized groups, such as lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people of color (LGBT POC). Also, although research has documented resilience in the face of minority stress at the individual level, research is needed that examines macro-level processes such as community resilience (Meyer, 2015). In the current study, we integrate minority stress theory and intersectionality theory to examine multiple minority stress (i...
March 2018: Psychology of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity
Monica Guo, Kathleen O'Connor Duffany, Fatma M Shebl, Alycia Santilli, Danya E Keene
Perceptions of neighborhood safety shape the well-being of individuals and communities, affecting neighborhood walkability, associated physical activity behaviors, and health conditions. However, less is known about the factors that determine perceptions of safety. One factor that may affect perceptions of neighborhood safety is the length of time someone has lived in their neighborhood. We use a representative, adult sample of urban low-income residents from the 2015 New Haven Health Survey (n = 1189) to investigate the associations between length of residence (new residents of < 1 year in neighborhood versus longer-term residents of 1 or more years in neighborhood) and perceptions of neighborhood safety (whether feeling unsafe to walk at night)...
March 14, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
Sean C Lucan, Andrew R Maroko, Jason L Seitchik, Don Yoon, Luisa E Sperry, Clyde B Schechter
Local businesses that offer foods may create different 'grazing environments' (characterized by sources of ready-to-consume foods) and 'grocery environments' (characterized by source of foods for later preparation). Such environments may be relevant to different populations at different times and may vary by neighborhood. In neighborhoods within two demographically distinct areas of the Bronx, NY [Area A (higher-poverty, greater minority representation, lesser vehicle ownership) vs. Area B], researchers assessed all storefront businesses for food offerings...
March 14, 2018: Journal of Community Health
Eiman Zargaran, Richard Spence, Lauren Adolph, Andrew Nicol, Nadine Schuurman, Pradeep Navsaria, Damon Ramsey, S Morad Hameed
Importance: Collection and analysis of up-to-date and accurate injury surveillance data are a key step in the maturation of trauma systems. Trauma registries have proven to be difficult to establish in low- and middle-income countries owing to the burden of trauma volume, cost, and complexity. Objective: To determine whether an electronic trauma health record (eTHR) used by physicians can serve as simultaneous clinical documentation and data acquisition tools. Design, Setting, and Participants: This 2-part quality improvement study included (1) preimplementation and postimplementation eTHR study with assessments of satisfaction by 41 trauma physicians, time to completion, and quality of data collected comparing paper and electronic charting; and (2) prospective ecologic study describing the burden of trauma seen at a Level I trauma center, using real-time data collected by the eTHR on consecutive patients during a 12-month study period...
March 14, 2018: JAMA Surgery
Alessia Bramanti, Ernesto D'Aloja, Federico Cabras, Pasquale Paribello, Maria Francesca Moro, Jutta Lindert, Mauro Giovanni Carta
Introduction: Two main demographic phenomena have substantially changed the condition of elderly: the growth of the urban population and the increase in longevity. Objective: The aim of the present review is to investigate how the elderly living in the cities perceive the sense of insecurity compared to those who reside in rural areas, and their Quality of Life (QoL). Method: Studies published from January 2011 to August 2017 were identified on Google and PubMed combining the following terms: "elderly urban/rural QoL" or "old age urban/rural QoL"...
2018: Clinical Practice and Epidemiology in Mental Health: CP & EMH
Erin R Kulick, Gregory A Wellenius, Amelia K Boehme, Ralph L Sacco, Mitchell S Elkind
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The evidence supporting the deleterious cardiovascular health effects of living near a major roadway is growing, although this association is not universal. In primary analyses, we hypothesized that residential proximity to a major roadway would be associated with incident ischemic stroke and that cardiovascular risk factors would modify that association. METHODS: NOMAS (The Northern Manhattan Study) is an ongoing, population-based cohort study designed to measure cardiovascular risk factors, stroke incidence, and other outcomes in a multiethnic urban population...
March 14, 2018: Stroke; a Journal of Cerebral Circulation
Tiffany L Gary-Webb, Elizabeth A Walker, Lindsey Realmuto, Alexandra Kamler, Jennifer Lukin, William Tyson, Olveen Carrasquillo, Linda Weiss
The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) landmark randomized trial demonstrated that participants with prediabetes could reduce their risk for type 2 diabetes by 58% if they achieved 5%-7% weight loss through healthy eating and increasing physical activity. The National DPP (NDPP) is a group intervention based on the DPP and has been widely disseminated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and many healthcare institutions. While data show that the program is effective in diverse populations, enrollment among men from low-income and minority communities is low...
March 1, 2018: American Journal of Men's Health
Elizabeth A Walker, Linda Weiss, Tiffany L Gary-Webb, Lindsey Realmuto, Alexandra Kamler, Joseph Ravenell, Carlos Tejeda, Jennifer Lukin, Clyde B Schechter
There is a significant evidence base for the Diabetes Prevention Program, a lifestyle intervention to prevent onset of type 2 diabetes among high-risk individuals; however, translation of this intervention for men has been challenging. This report presents outcomes of the pilot study of an adapted 16-week diabetes prevention program entitled " Power Up for Health." The study goal was to better engage men of color with prediabetes from disadvantaged neighborhoods of New York City. It was implemented at five different recreation centers located in predominantly low-income neighborhoods across New York City...
March 1, 2018: American Journal of Men's Health
Hye Ah Lee, Hyejin Han, Seonhwa Lee, Bomi Park, Bo Hyun Park, Won Kyung Lee, Ju Ok Park, Sungok Hong, Young Taek Kim, Hyesook Park
BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that health risks are affected by geographical area, but there are few studies on contextual effects using multilevel analysis, especially regarding unintentional injury. This study investigated trends in unintentional injury hospitalization rates over the past decade in Korea, and also examined community-level risk factors while controlling for individual-level factors. METHODS: Using data from the 2004 to 2013 Korea National Hospital Discharge Survey (KNHDS), trends in age-adjusted injury hospitalization rate were conducted using the Joinpoint Regression Program...
March 13, 2018: BMC Public Health
Makoto Fujiu, Yuma Morisaki, Junichi Takayama, Kiyoko Yanagihara, Tatsuya Nishino, Masahiko Sagae, Kohei Hirako
The 2013 Partial Amendment of the Disaster Countermeasures Basic Law mandated that a roster of vulnerable persons during disasters be created, and further development of evacuation support is expected. In this study, the number of vulnerable people living in target analytical areas are identified in terms of neighborhood units by using the National Health Insurance Database to create a realistic and efficient evacuation support plan. Later, after considering the "vulnerability" of an area to earthquake disaster damage, a quantitative evaluation of the state of the disaster is performed using a principle component analysis that further divided the analytical target areas into neighborhood units to make a detailed determination of the number of disaster-vulnerable persons, the severity of the disaster, etc...
March 13, 2018: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Courtney Rogers, Joy Johnson, Brianne Nueslein, David Edmunds, Rupa S Valdez
As chronic conditions are on the rise in the USA, management initiatives outside of the inpatient setting should be explored to reduce associated cost and access disparities. Chronic conditions disproportionately affect African American public housing residents due to the effects of historical marginalization on the manifestation of economic and social problems exacerbating health disparities and outcomes. Informed by participatory research action tenets, this study focused on identifying the challenges to management of chronic conditions and developing community-envisioned initiatives to address these challenges in a predominantly African American public housing community...
March 12, 2018: Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities
Thida Win, Toru Yamazaki, Koji Kanda, Kazuo Tajima, Shigeru Sokejima
BACKGROUND: Studies on social capital and health outcomes have become common, but the relationship between neighborhood social capital and sleep duration by gender is still unclear. We examined the relationship between neighborhood social capital and sleep duration by gender in adults living in a rural community in Japan. METHOD: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 12,321 residents aged ≥20 years in a town in Mie Prefecture in January-March 2013. Self-completed questionnaires were collected from the residents (n = 7782; valid participation rate, 63...
March 12, 2018: BMC Public Health
Elizabeth L Tung, Kelly Boyd, Stacy Tessler Lindau, Monica E Peek
Neighborhood crime may be an important social determinant of health in many high-poverty, urban communities, yet little is known about its relationship with access to health-enabling resources. We recruited an address-based probability sample of 267 participants (ages ≥35 years) on Chicago's South Side between 2012 and 2013. Participants were queried about their perceptions of neighborhood safety and prior experiences of neighborhood crime. Survey data were paired to a comprehensive, directly-observed census of the built environment on the South Side of Chicago...
March 2018: Preventive Medicine Reports
Mohammad Javad Koohsari, Takemi Sugiyama, Tomoya Hanibuchi, Ai Shibata, Kaori Ishii, Yung Liao, Koichiro Oka
Objective measures of environmental attributes have been used to understand how neighborhood environments relate to physical activity. However, this method relies on detailed spatial data, which are often not easily available. Walk Score® is a free, publicly available web-based tool that shows how walkable a given location is based on objectively-derived proximity to several types of local destinations and street connectivity. To date, several studies have tested the concurrent validity of Walk Score as a measure of neighborhood walkability in the USA and Canada...
March 2018: Preventive Medicine Reports
Patricia Anafi, Wisdom K Mprah, Allen M Jackson, Janelle J Jacobson, Christopher M Torres, Brent M Crow, Kathleen M O'Rourke
In 2008, the government of Ghana implemented a national user fee maternal care exemption policy through the National Health Insurance Scheme to improve financial access to maternal health services and reduce maternal as well as perinatal deaths. Although evidence shows that there has been some success with this initiative, there are still issues relating to cost of care to beneficiaries of the initiative. A qualitative study, comprising 12 focus group discussions and 6 interviews, was conducted with 90 women in six selected urban neighborhoods in Accra, Ghana, to examine users' perspectives regarding the implementation of this policy initiative...
January 1, 2018: International Quarterly of Community Health Education
Alexander Schrodt, Tam Huynh, Tamara N Fitzgerald
Motor vehicle collisions (MVCs) are a significant cause of pediatric morbidity, particularly in low- to middle-income countries. We describe car seat use in children on the USA-Mexico border. A retrospective review was conducted for children 0-9 years old, admitted to the region's only Level I trauma center. Simultaneously, data were obtained from the SAFE KIDS database, a program that encourages car seat use through city checkpoints. There were 250 MVC admissions and nine fatalities in children 0-9 years old from 2010 to 2015...
March 2018: Journal of Trauma Nursing: the Official Journal of the Society of Trauma Nurses
Veni Kandasamy, Ashley H Hirai, Reem M Ghandour, Michael D Kogan
OBJECTIVE: Flourishing reflects positive mental health and thriving and is important for children's development and well-being. Few national studies of flourishing among school-aged children exist. Exposure to socioeconomic disadvantage is negatively associated with social and health outcomes, including flourishing. This analysis describes independent associations of the child, family, school, and neighborhood factors with flourishing, which we hypothesized may contribute to sociodemographic disparities...
March 6, 2018: Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics: JDBP
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