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Latino health

Krista M Perreira, Ashley N Marchante, Seth J Schwartz, Carmen R Isasi, Mercedes R Carnethon, Heather L Corliss, Robert C Kaplan, Daniel A Santisteban, Denise C Vidot, Linda Van Horn, Alan M Delamater
This study examined associations of immigrant generation, acculturation, and sources of stress and resilience with four outcomes-depression symptoms, anxiety symptoms, alcohol susceptibility, and smoking susceptibility. We used data from 1466 youth (ages 8-16) enrolled in the Hispanic Community Health Study of Latino Youth (SOL Youth), a probability sample of Hispanic/Latino youth living in Chicago (IL), Miami (FL), Bronx (NY), and San Diego (CA). We found no evidence of an immigrant paradox. Greater children's acculturative stress was associated with depression/anxiety symptoms; greater parent's acculturative stress was associated with smoking susceptibility...
March 17, 2018: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health
Ephraim Shapiro
INTRODUCTION: In general, church attendance can be associated with improved health behaviors and fewer related chronic diseases, suggesting a potential opportunity to counteract worsening health behaviors among some immigrants and thereby reduce health disparities. There is a paucity of research, however, on the relationship between religious involvement and immigrants' health behaviors and whether it varies by host or home country context. AIM: To examine the relationship between religious involvement, measured by church attendance, with health behaviors among Latino immigrants in the United States (U...
March 16, 2018: Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities
Kandy Bahadur, Shilpa Pai, Estherline Thoby, Anna Petrova
Food insecurity (FI) has been recognized as a public challenge not only for developing countries but also for the U.S. POPULATION: The present study was designed to identify the prevalence of FI and the association of household FI with the health status of pediatric patients seen at a Federally Qualified Health Center in New Jersey which provides health care mainly for Latino patients. Patients were included if they were screened for FI at their well visits during a 4-month period following implementation of the 2-item screening tool recommended by American Academy of Pediatrics...
March 16, 2018: Journal of Community Health
Carmen R Isasi, Garrett M Strizich, Robert Kaplan, Martha L Daviglus, Daniela Sotres-Alvarez, Denise C Vidot, Maria M Llabre, Gregory Talavera, Mercedes R Carnethon
PURPOSE: To evaluate the relationship of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) with cardiovascular disease risk factors and a biomarker of endothelial dysfunction (e-selectin) among Hispanic/Latino youth. METHODS: The study included 1380 Hispanic/Latino youths (8-16 years old) from the Hispanic Community Children's Health Study/Study of Latino Youth that enrolled from four cities (Bronx, Chicago, Miami, and San Diego). CRF was assessed by a 3-minute step test that uses postexercise heart rate to estimate maximal oxygen uptake...
February 15, 2018: Annals of Epidemiology
Stephane M Shepherd, Cynthia Willis-Esqueda, Yin Paradies, Diane Sivasubramaniam, Juanita Sherwood, Teresa Brockie
BACKGROUND: Disparities across a number of health indicators between the general population and particular racial and cultural minority groups including African Americans, Native Americans and Latino/a Americans have been well documented. Some evidence suggests that particular groups may receive poorer standards of care due to biased beliefs or attitudes held by health professionals. Less research has been conducted in specifically non-urban areas with smaller minority populations. METHODS: This study explored the self-reported health care experiences for 117 racial and cultural minority Americans residing in a Mid-Western jurisdiction...
March 16, 2018: International Journal for Equity in Health
Sharon E Taverno Ross, Bethany Barone Gibbs, Patricia I Documet, Russell R Pate
BACKGROUND: Latino preschool children have higher rates of obesity than preschool children from other racial/ethnic groups; however, few effective, culturally appropriate interventions exist targeting this group. The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of a 10-week, promotora-mediated, home-based intervention to promote a healthy weight in Latino preschool children. METHODS: Trained promotoras (community health workers) delivered 10, 90-min weekly interactive and tailored sessions to Latino families living in Allegheny County...
March 16, 2018: BMC Public Health
Amanda C McClain, Guadalupe X Ayala, Daniela Sotres-Alvarez, Anna Maria Siega-Riz, Robert C Kaplan, Marc D Gellman, Linda C Gallo, Linda Van Horn, Martha L Daviglus, Marisa J Perera, Josiemer Mattei
Background: Away-from-home foods (AFHFs) influence diet quality, a modifiable obesity risk factor, with limited generalizable evidence in Hispanic/Latino adults. Objective: We investigated associations between AFHF intake with diet quality and overweight or obesity among US Hispanic/Latino adults. Methods: Cross-sectional baseline (2008-2011) analyses included adults (n = 16,045) aged 18-74 y in the national Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos...
March 1, 2018: Journal of Nutrition
Elizabeth A McConnell, Patrick Janulis, Gregory Phillips, Roky Truong, Michelle Birkett
Minority stress theory has widespread research support in explaining health disparities experienced by sexual and gender minorities. However, less is known about how minority stress impacts multiply marginalized groups, such as lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people of color (LGBT POC). Also, although research has documented resilience in the face of minority stress at the individual level, research is needed that examines macro-level processes such as community resilience (Meyer, 2015). In the current study, we integrate minority stress theory and intersectionality theory to examine multiple minority stress (i...
March 2018: Psychology of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity
Richard H Singer, Mark Stoutenberg, Daniel J Feaster, Jianwen Cai, WayWay M Hlaing, Lisa R Metsch, Christian R Salazar, Shirley M Beaver, Tracy L Finlayson, Gregory Talavera, Marc D Gellman, Neil Schneiderman
BACKGROUND: Current evidence suggests that periodontal disease (PD) is associated with a significant increased risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) independent of known confounders. PD is a chronic oral disease with significant variation in prevalence demonstrated among Hispanic/Latino subgroups. The purpose of this study was to investigate the associations between PD and CVD risk and variations with sex, age, and Hispanic/Latino background. METHODS: The sample included 7,379 participants aged 30-74 years, from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (2008 to 2011)...
March 14, 2018: Journal of Periodontology
Tiffany L Gary-Webb, Elizabeth A Walker, Lindsey Realmuto, Alexandra Kamler, Jennifer Lukin, William Tyson, Olveen Carrasquillo, Linda Weiss
The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) landmark randomized trial demonstrated that participants with prediabetes could reduce their risk for type 2 diabetes by 58% if they achieved 5%-7% weight loss through healthy eating and increasing physical activity. The National DPP (NDPP) is a group intervention based on the DPP and has been widely disseminated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and many healthcare institutions. While data show that the program is effective in diverse populations, enrollment among men from low-income and minority communities is low...
March 1, 2018: American Journal of Men's Health
Elizabeth A Walker, Linda Weiss, Tiffany L Gary-Webb, Lindsey Realmuto, Alexandra Kamler, Joseph Ravenell, Carlos Tejeda, Jennifer Lukin, Clyde B Schechter
There is a significant evidence base for the Diabetes Prevention Program, a lifestyle intervention to prevent onset of type 2 diabetes among high-risk individuals; however, translation of this intervention for men has been challenging. This report presents outcomes of the pilot study of an adapted 16-week diabetes prevention program entitled " Power Up for Health." The study goal was to better engage men of color with prediabetes from disadvantaged neighborhoods of New York City. It was implemented at five different recreation centers located in predominantly low-income neighborhoods across New York City...
March 1, 2018: American Journal of Men's Health
Jacqueline M Torres, Julianna Deardorff, Robert B Gunier, Kim G Harley, Abbey Alkon, Katherine Kogut, Brenda Eskenazi
Background: U.S. Latinos report high levels of concern about deportation for themselves or others. No previous research has tested the link between worry about deportation and clinical measures of cardiovascular risk. Purpose: We estimate the associations between worry about deportation and clinically measured cardiovascular risk factors. Methods: Data come from the Center for the Health Assessment of Mothers and Children of Salinas study...
February 5, 2018: Annals of Behavioral Medicine: a Publication of the Society of Behavioral Medicine
Jecca Rhea Steinberg, Janine S Bruce, Paloma Marin-Nevarez, Kimmy Phan, Sylvia Bereknyei Merrell, Lisa J Chamberlain
OBJECTIVE: School readiness by kindergarten entry is associated with increased high school graduation, decreased juvenile arrest, and better long-term health. Inadequate early childhood learning (ECL) disproportionately affects low-income children. Pediatricians have near-universal access to children younger than 5 years but remain an underused ECL resource. This study examined caregivers' perceptions of ECL, the role of the pediatrician and pediatric office, and the use of community-based ECL resources among diverse, low-income caregivers whose children were not enrolled in preschool...
March 13, 2018: Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics: JDBP
Stacie Craft DeFreitas, Travis Crone, Martha DeLeon, Anna Ajayi
Mental health stigma occurs when people have negative thoughts and beliefs of those with mental health illnesses or mental health treatment. Mental health stigma is related to an assortment of negative outcomes including discrimination in housing and employment, reduced usage of mental health services, and poor mental health outcomes. These implications may be particularly salient for ethnic minorities such as African Americans and Latinos who already suffer from other types of discrimination. This study examines perceived and personal mental health stigma in African American and Latino college students from a nontraditional university to help elucidate factors related to the development of mental health stigma...
2018: Frontiers in Public Health
Ellen L Vaughan, Lauren A Wright, Miguel Ángel Cano, Marcel A de Dios
This study addresses gaps in the literature by testing gender differences in the associations between substance use norms and substance use among Latino college students. Secondary data analysis was conducted using data from the 2009 National College Health Assessment. Participants selected for this study were 4,336 Latino undergraduates. Linear mixed modeling was used to test gender as a moderator of the relationship between alcohol use norms and alcohol use as well as marijuana use norms and marijuana use...
March 12, 2018: Substance Use & Misuse
Cynthia M Mojica, Deborah Parra-Medina, Sally Vernon
INTRODUCTION: Colorectal cancer, the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States, is also among the most preventable cancers. However, Latino men are less likely than non-Latino men to engage in preventive screening. Compared with 60% of non-Latino white men and women, only 42% of Latino men are up to date with colorectal cancer screening guidelines, which may result in diagnosis at advanced disease stages and increased deaths. We evaluated the literature on colorectal cancer screening interventions among Latino men to characterize intervention components effective in increasing colorectal cancer screening...
March 8, 2018: Preventing Chronic Disease
Malinda R Douglas, Jon P Lowry, Latricia A Morgan
Training of practitioners on evidence-based public health has shown to be beneficial, yet overwhelming. Chunking information and proximate practical application are effective techniques to increase retention in adult learning. Evidence-based public health training for practitioners from African American and Hispanic/Latino community agencies and tribes/tribal nations incorporated these 2 techniques. The community-level practitioners alternated attending training and implementing the steps of the evidence-based public health framework as they planned state-funded programs...
March 7, 2018: Journal of Public Health Management and Practice: JPHMP
Snehal N Shah, Eleni Digenis-Bury, Elizabeth T Russo, Shannon O'Malley, Nineequa Blanding, Anne McHugh, Roy Wada
Well documented, persistent racial/ethnic health disparities in obesity and hypertension in the US demonstrate the continued need for interventions that focus on people of color who may be at higher risk. We evaluated a demonstration project funded by the CDC's Racial/Ethnic Approaches to Community Health (REACH) program at four federally qualified health centers (FQHC) and YMCA fitness and wellness centers in Boston. No-cost YMCA memberships were offered from June 2014 to June 2015 to non-Latino black and Latino adults with a diagnosis of hypertension...
June 2018: Preventive Medicine Reports
Patricia Isabel Documet, Mark M Troyer, Laura Macia
OBJECTIVE: To determine the association of social support with alcohol abuse, depression, and health care access among Latino immigrant men in an emerging Latino community (an area with a small yet growing Latino population). METHODS: Cross-sectional baseline data of 140 men prior to a participatory male-to-male community health worker intervention among Latino immigrants were analyzed using logistic regression. Community health workers recruited community participants in Western Pennsylvania between 2011 and 2013...
March 1, 2018: Health Education & Behavior: the Official Publication of the Society for Public Health Education
Kelly R Ylitalo, M Renée Umstattd Meyer, Beth A Lanning, Christina During, Ryan Laschober, Jackson O Griggs
Adults with limited health literacy have difficulty managing chronic conditions, higher hospitalization rates, and more healthcare expenditures. Simple screening tools have been developed, but limited work has evaluated instruments among low-income populations. This study assessed health literacy among primary care patients of a federally qualified health center, and compared a single screening question about perceived difficulty completing medical forms.A cross-sectional survey was administered to English-speaking patients ≥40 years...
March 2018: Medicine (Baltimore)
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