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Exercise cognition older brain

Rune Rasmussen, Mette Midttun, Tine Kolenda, Anne-Mette Ragle, Thea Winther Sørensen, Anders Vinther, Bo Zerahn, Maria Pedersen, Karsten Overgaard
BACKGROUND: Fall accidents are a major cause of mortality among the elderly and the leading cause of traumatic brain injury. After a fall, many elderly people never completely recover and need help in coping with everyday life. Due to the increasing older population in the world, injuries, disabilities, and deaths caused by falls are a growing worldwide problem. Muscle weakness leads to greatly increased risk of falling, decreased quality of life, and decline in functional capacity. Muscle mass and muscle power decrease about 40% from age 20 to 80 years, and the level of testosterone decreases with age and leads to impaired muscle mass...
March 2, 2018: JMIR Research Protocols
Matheus Uba Chupel, Luciele Guerra Minuzzi, Guilherme E Furtado, Mário Leonardo Santos, Eef Hogervorst, Edith Filaire, Ana Maria Teixeira
Immunosenescence contribute to increase the blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, leading cognitive impairment and neurodegeneration. Thus, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effect of exercise and taurine supplementation on peripheral markers of blood-brain barrier, inflammation, and cognition of elderly women. Forty-eight elderly women (83.58±6.9 years) participated in the study, and were allocated into combined exercise training (CET: n=13), taurine supplementation (TAU: n=12), exercise training associated with taurine (CET+TAU: n=11), or control group (CG: n=12)...
February 23, 2018: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Physiologie Appliquée, Nutrition et Métabolisme
Jong Won Min
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study is twofold: first, to identify cognitive trajectories of older Koreans in a population-based longitudinal panel survey and, second, to investigate the main characteristics of the identified heterogeneous classes of cognitive trajectories. METHODS: Data came from 2445 cognitively healthy persons aged 60 or older in the 2006 to 2012 Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging. Using Korean-mini mental status examination (K-MMSE) as a measure of global cognitive function, the latent growth mixture modeling approach examined potential heterogeneity of longitudinal changes over the 6 years...
January 24, 2018: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Maureen Schmitter-Edgecombe, Richard Lamb, Courtney McAlister, Thao Vo, Kayela Robertson
OBJECTIVES: Accumulating research indicates that engaging in healthy lifestyle behaviors (e.g. exercise, cognitive and social engagement, stress reduction) can prevent illness and disability as people age and improve mental health. The Healthy Aging Activity Engagement (HAAE) scale was developed to holistically assess an individual's level of engagement in healthy aging behaviors across multiple health domains. METHODS: Participants were 275 healthy younger, midlife and older adults...
December 28, 2017: Aging & Mental Health
Elliott Vichinsky
Sickle cell disease is now a chronic adult illness characterized by progressive multiorgan failure, particularly involving the brain and kidney. The etiology is multifactorial; it includes hemolysis and nitric oxide deficiency. As patients age, most experience neurologic insult. Twenty-five percent of older adults have had a clinical stroke and at least half of the population have had a silent infarct, cortical atrophy, and neurocognitive impairment. Periodic screening with neuroimaging and neurocognitive testing is recommended...
December 8, 2017: Hematology—the Education Program of the American Society of Hematology
Gregory J Christie, Tara Hamilton, Bradley D Manor, Norman A S Farb, Faranak Farzan, Andrew Sixsmith, Jean-Jacques Temprado, Sylvain Moreno
The number of patients suffering from dementia is expected to more than triple by the year 2040, and this represents a major challenge to publicly-funded healthcare systems throughout the world. One of the most effective prevention mechanisms against dementia lies in increasing brain- and cognitive-reserve capacity, which has been found to reduce the behavioral severity of dementia symptoms as neurological degeneration progresses. To date though, most of the factors known to enhance this reserve stem from largely immutable history factors, such as level of education and occupational attainment...
2017: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience
Jessika I V Buitenweg, Renate M van de Ven, Sam Prinssen, Jaap M J Murre, K Richard Ridderinkhof
As aging is associated with cognitive decline, particularly in the executive functions, it is essential to effectively improve cognition in older adults. Online cognitive training is currently a popular, though controversial method. Although some changes seem possible in older adults through training, far transfer, and longitudinal maintenance are rarely seen. Based on previous literature we created a unique, state-of-the-art intervention study by incorporating frequent sessions and flexible, novel, adaptive training tasks, along with an active control group...
2017: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
Nandu Goswami, Andrew P Blaber, Helmut Hinghofer-Szalkay, Jean-Pierre Montani
Orthostatic challenge produced by upright posture may lead to syncope if the cardiovascular system is unable to maintain adequate brain perfusion. This review outlines orthostatic intolerance related to the aging process, long-term bedrest confinement, drugs, and disease. Aging-associated illness or injury due to falls often leads to hospitalization. Older patients spend up to 83% of hospital admission lying in bed and thus the consequences of bedrest confinement such as physiological deconditioning, functional decline, and orthostatic intolerance represent a central challenge in the care of the vulnerable older population...
2017: Frontiers in Physiology
Anne Canivet, Cédric T Albinet, Montserrat Rodríguez-Ballesteros, Christian Chicherio, Delphine Fagot, Nathalie André, Michel Audiffren
Background: In the elderly, physical activity (PA) enhances cognitive performances, increases brain plasticity and improves brain health. The neurotrophic hypothesis is that the release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is implicated in brain plasticity and cognition, is triggered by PA because motoneurons secrete BDNF into the bloodstream during exercise. Individual differences in cognitive performance may be explained by individual differences in genetic predisposition. A single nucleotide polymorphism on the BDNF gene, BDNF Val66Met, affects activity-dependent BDNF secretion...
2017: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
Hiroyuki Shimada, Hyuma Makizako, Takehiko Doi, Hyuntae Park, Kota Tsutsumimoto, Joe Verghese, Takao Suzuki
IMPORTANCE: Although participation in physical and cognitive activities is encouraged to reduce the risk of dementia, the preventive efficacy of these activities for patients with mild cognitive impairment is unestablished. OBJECTIVE: To compare the cognitive and mobility effects of a 40-week program of combined cognitive and physical activity with those of a health education program. DESIGN: A randomized, parallel, single-blind controlled trial...
November 16, 2017: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association
Belinda M Brown, Stephanie R Rainey-Smith, Natalie Castalanelli, Nicole Gordon, Shaun Markovic, Hamid R Sohrabi, Michael Weinborn, Simon M Laws, James Doecke, Kaikai Shen, Ralph N Martins, Jeremiah J Peiffer
Introduction: Inconsistent results from previous studies of exercise and cognitive function suggest that rigorously designed randomized controlled trials are urgently needed. Here, we describe the design of the Intense Physical Activity and Cognition (IPAC) study, which will assess the impact of a 6-month high-intensity exercise intervention on cognitive function and biomarkers of dementia risk, compared with a 6-month moderate-intensity exercise intervention and control group (no study-related exercise)...
November 2017: Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions
Andrea Z LaCroix, Rebecca A Hubbard, Shelly L Gray, Melissa L Anderson, Paul K Crane, Joshua A Sonnen, Oleg Zaslavsky, Eric B Larson
BACKGROUND: Mechanisms linking cognitive and physical functioning in older adults are unclear. We sought to determine whether brain pathological changes relate to the level or rate of physical performance decline. METHODS: This study analyzed data from 305 participants in the autopsy subcohort of the prospective Adult Changes in Thought (ACT) study. Participants were aged 65+ and free of dementia at enrollment. Physical performance was measured at baseline and every two years using the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB)...
November 2, 2017: BMC Geriatrics
Haley M LaMonica, Amelia English, Ian B Hickie, Jerome Ip, Catriona Ireland, Stacey West, Tim Shaw, Loren Mowszowski, Nick Glozier, Shantel Duffy, Alice A Gibson, Sharon L Naismith
BACKGROUND: Interest in electronic health (eHealth) technologies to screen for and treat a variety of medical and mental health problems is growing exponentially. However, no studies to date have investigated the feasibility of using such e-tools for older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or dementia. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to describe patterns of Internet use, as well as interest in and preferences for eHealth technologies among older adults with varying degrees of cognitive impairment...
October 25, 2017: Journal of Medical Internet Research
Michael J Wheeler, Paddy C Dempsey, Megan S Grace, Kathryn A Ellis, Paul A Gardiner, Daniel J Green, David W Dunstan
Cognitive decline leading to dementia represents a global health burden. In the absence of targeted pharmacotherapy, lifestyle approaches remain the best option for slowing the onset of dementia. However, older adults spend very little time doing moderate to vigorous exercise and spend a majority of time in sedentary behavior. Sedentary behavior has been linked to poor glycemic control and increased risk of all-cause mortality. Here, we explore a potential link between sedentary behavior and brain health. We highlight the role of glycemic control in maintaining brain function and suggest that reducing and replacing sedentary behavior with intermittent light-intensity physical activity may protect against cognitive decline by reducing glycemic variability...
September 2017: Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions
Sandra B Chapman, Jeffrey S Spence, Sina Aslan, Molly W Keebler
Non-invasive interventions, such as cognitive training (CT) and physical exercise, are gaining momentum as ways to augment both cognitive and brain function throughout life. One of the most fundamental yet little studied aspects of human cognition is innovative thinking, especially in older adults. In this study, we utilize a measure of innovative cognition that examines both the quantity and quality of abstracted interpretations. This randomized pilot trial in cognitively normal adults (56-75 years) compared the effect of cognitive reasoning training (SMART) on innovative cognition as measured by Multiple Interpretations Measure (MIM)...
2017: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience
M L Callisaya, R M Daly, J E Sharman, D Bruce, T M E Davis, T Greenaway, M Nolan, R Beare, M G Schultz, T Phan, L C Blizzard, V K Srikanth
BACKGROUND: Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) is associated with increased risk of dementia. We aimed to determine the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) examining the efficacy of exercise on cognition and brain structure in people with T2D. METHODS: A 6-month pilot parallel RCT of a progressive aerobic- and resistance-training program versus a gentle movement control group in people with T2D aged 50-75 years (n = 50) at the University of Tasmania, Australia...
October 16, 2017: BMC Geriatrics
Cindy K Barha, Ging-Yuek R Hsiung, John R Best, Jennifer C Davis, Janice J Eng, Claudia Jacova, Philip E Lee, Michelle Munkacsy, Winnie Cheung, Teresa Liu-Ambrose
Aerobic training (AT) is a promising, non-pharmacological intervention to mitigate the deleterious effects of aging and disease on brain health. However, a large amount of variation exists in its efficacy. This is a secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial of AT in 71 older adults with subcortical ischemic vascular cognitive impairment (NCT01027858). Specifically, we investigated: 1) whether sex moderates the relationship between AT and executive functions, and 2) the role of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and gains in functional fitness capacity...
2017: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease: JAD
Takashi Tarumi, Rong Zhang
Senescence is a leading cause of mortality, disability, and non-communicable chronic diseases in older adults. Mounting evidence indicates that the presence of cardiovascular disease and risk factors elevates the incidence of both vascular cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Age-related declines in cardiovascular function may impair cerebral blood flow (CBF) regulation, leading to the disruption of neuronal micro-environmental homeostasis. The brain is the most metabolically active organ with limited intracellular energy storage and critically depends on CBF to sustain neuronal metabolism...
October 6, 2017: Journal of Neurochemistry
S Matura, J Fleckenstein, R Deichmann, T Engeroff, E Füzéki, E Hattingen, R Hellweg, B Lienerth, U Pilatus, S Schwarz, V A Tesky, L Vogt, W Banzer, J Pantel
There is mounting evidence that aerobic exercise has a positive effect on cognitive functions in older adults. To date, little is known about the neurometabolic and molecular mechanisms underlying this positive effect. The present study used magnetic resonance spectroscopy and quantitative MRI to systematically explore the effects of physical activity on human brain metabolism and grey matter (GM) volume in healthy aging. This is a randomised controlled assessor-blinded two-armed trial (n=53) to explore exercise-induced neuroprotective and metabolic effects on the brain in cognitively healthy older adults...
July 18, 2017: Translational Psychiatry
Kristin Prehn, Anne Lesemann, Georgia Krey, A Veronica Witte, Theresa Köbe, Ulrike Grittner, Agnes Flöel
Cardiovascular fitness is thought to exert beneficial effects on brain function and might delay the onset of cognitive decline. Empirical evidence of exercise-induced cognitive enhancement, however, has not been conclusive, possibly due to short intervention times in clinical trials. Resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) has been proposed asan early indicator for intervention-induced changes. Here, we conducted a study in which healthy older overweight subjects took either part in a moderate aerobic exercise program over 6months (AE group; n=11) or control condition of non-aerobic stretching and toning (NAE group; n=18)...
August 23, 2017: Brain and Cognition
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