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Exercise cognition brain

Julia Vakhrusheva, Brielle Marino, T Scott Stroup, David Kimhy
Schizophrenia is characterized by extensive neurocognitive deficits, which are linked to greater disability, poorer functional outcome, and have been suggested to impact daily functioning more than clinical symptoms. Aerobic exercise (AE) has emerged as a potential intervention. This review examines the impact of AE on brain structure and function along with neurocognitive performance in individuals with schizophrenia. Preliminary evidence indicates that AE can increase hippocampal volume and cortical thickness, in addition to exerting a neuroprotective effect against hippocampal volume decrease and cortical thinning...
June 2016: Current Behavioral Neuroscience Reports
Matías Alvarez-Saavedra, Yves De Repentigny, Doo Yang, Ryan W O'Meara, Keqin Yan, Lukas E Hashem, Lemuel Racacho, Ilya Ioshikhes, Dennis E Bulman, Robin J Parks, Rashmi Kothary, David J Picketts
Exercise has been argued to enhance cognitive function and slow progressive neurodegenerative disease. Although exercise promotes neurogenesis, oligodendrogenesis and adaptive myelination are also significant contributors to brain repair and brain health. Nonetheless, the molecular details underlying these effects remain poorly understood. Conditional ablation of the Snf2h gene impairs cerebellar development producing mice with poor motor function, progressive ataxia, and death between postnatal days 25-45...
October 11, 2016: Cell Reports
Sven Briken, Sina Cathérine Rosenkranz, Oliver Keminer, Stefan Patra, Gesche Ketels, Christoph Heesen, Rainer Hellweg, Ole Pless, Karl-Heinz Schulz, Stefan M Gold
BACKGROUND: Clinical studies have suggested beneficial effects of exercise on cognitive function in ageing adults and neurodegenerative diseases such as dementia. Recent work indicates the same for progressive multiple sclerosis (MS), an inflammatory and degenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS). The biological pathways associated with these effects are however not well understood. OBJECTIVE: In this randomized controlled study, we explored serum levels of the myokine Irisin, the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and Interleukin-6 (IL-6) during acute endurance exercise and over the course of a 9-weeks endurance exercise training period in n=42 patients with progressive MS...
October 15, 2016: Journal of Neuroimmunology
Krister Håkansson, Aurélie Ledreux, Kirk Daffner, Yvonne Terjestam, Patrick Bergman, Roger Carlsson, Miia Kivipelto, Bengt Winblad, Ann-Charlotte Granholm, Abdul Kadir H Mohammed
Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has a central role in brain plasticity by mediating changes in cortical thickness and synaptic density in response to physical activity and environmental enrichment. Previous studies suggest that physical exercise can augment BDNF levels, both in serum and the brain, but no other study has examined how different types of activities compare with physical exercise in their ability to affect BDNF levels. By using a balanced cross over experimental design, we exposed nineteen healthy older adults to 35-minute sessions of physical exercise, cognitive training, and mindfulness practice, and compared the resulting changes in mature BDNF levels between the three activities...
October 4, 2016: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease: JAD
Therese M O'Neil-Pirozzi, Henry Hsu
PRIMARY OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this pilot study was to explore feasibility and effects of participation in a computerized cognitive fitness exercise program by a group of adults with chronic moderate-to-severe cognitive impairments following an acquired brain injury (ABI). RESEARCH DESIGN: This study used a mixed methods design with a convenience sample of individuals forming two groups (+/- exercise). METHODS AND PROCEDURES: Following neurocognitive and satisfaction with life pre-testing of 14 participants, seven were enrolled in a 5-month, 5-days a week computerized cognitive exercise program...
September 28, 2016: Brain Injury: [BI]
Luis V Portela, Andressa W Brochier, Clarissa B Haas, Afonso Kopczynski de Carvalho, Jussania A Gnoato, Eduardo R Zimmer, Eduardo Kalinine, Luc Pellerin, Alexandre P Muller
Hyperpalatable diets (HP) impair brain metabolism, and regular physical exercise has an apparent opposite effect. Here, we combined a prior long-term exposure to HP diet followed by physical exercise and evaluated the impact on some neuroenergetic components and on cognitive performance. We assessed the extracellular lactate concentration, expression of monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs), pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), and mitochondrial function in the hippocampus. Male C57BL/6J mice were fed 4 months with HP or a control diet...
September 22, 2016: Molecular Neurobiology
Yael Netz, Mona Abu-Rukun, Sharon Tsuk, Tzvi Dwolatzky, Raffi Carasso, Oron Levin, Ayelet Dunsky
Acute exercise appears to facilitate certain aspects of cognitive processing. The possibility that exercise may lead to more efficient inhibitory processes is of particular interest, owing to the wide range of cognitive and motor functions that inhibition may underlie. The purpose of the present study was to examine the immediate and the delayed effect of acute aerobic exercise on response inhibition, motor planning, and eye-hand coordination in healthy active adults. Forty healthy and active participants (10 females) with a mean age of 51...
September 16, 2016: Brain and Cognition
Greg Kennedy, Roy J Hardman, Helen Macpherson, Andrew B Scholey, Andrew Pipingas
The rate of age-associated cognitive decline varies considerably between individuals. It is important, both on a societal and individual level, to investigate factors that underlie these differences in order to identify factors which might realistically slow cognitive decline. Physical activity is one such factor with substantial support in the literature. Regular exercise can positively influence cognitive ability, reduce the rate of cognitive aging, and even reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other dementias...
September 13, 2016: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease: JAD
James Loughead, Mary Falcone, E Paul Wileyto, Benjamin Albelda, Janet Audrain-McGovern, Wen Cao, Matthew M Kurtz, Ruben C Gur, Caryn Lerman
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Deficits in cognitive function are observed during nicotine withdrawal and present a challenge to successful smoking cessation. This clinical trial evaluated a cognitive exercise training (CT) program to improve smoking cessation rates. METHODS: Adult treatment-seeking smokers (n=213) were randomized to receive nicotine patch therapy and 12 weeks of either computerized CT or computerized relaxation (control) training. Smoking status was biochemically verified at the end of treatment and 6-month follow-up...
August 27, 2016: Drug and Alcohol Dependence
Adrian C Byram, Grace Lee, Adrian M Owen, Urs Ribary, A Jon Stoessl, Andrea Townson, Judy Illes
Recent neuroimaging research on disorders of consciousness provides direct evidence of covert consciousness otherwise not detected clinically in a subset of severely brain-injured patients. These findings have motivated strategic development of binary communication paradigms, from which researchers interpret voluntary modulations in brain activity to glean information about patients' residual cognitive functions and emotions. The discovery of such responsiveness raises ethical and legal issues concerning the exercise of autonomy and capacity for decisionmaking on matters such as healthcare, involvement in research, and end of life...
October 2016: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
Dimitrios Athanasopoulos, George Karagiannis, Magda Tsolaki
Alzheimer disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disease with no effective cure so far. The current review focuses on the epigenetic mechanisms of AD and how nutrition can influence the course of this disease through regulation of gene expression, according to the latest scientific findings. The search strategy was the use of scientific databases such as PubMed and Scopus in order to find relative research or review articles published in the years 2012-2015. By showing the latest data of various nutritional compounds, this study aims to stimulate the scientific community to recognize the value of nutrition in this subject...
September 2016: Advances in Nutrition
Bryan Heath Curry, Vernon Bond, Sudhakar Pemminati, Vasavi Rakesh Gorantla, Yulia Andreevna Volkova, Kishan Kadur, Richard Mark Millis
INTRODUCTION: Beetroot Juice (BJ) contains dietary nitrates that increase the blood Nitric Oxide (NO) level, decrease Blood Pressure (BP), increase athletic performance and improve cognitive functions but the mechanism remains unclear. Ultrasonographic measurement of middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity with computation of Cerebral Augmentation Index (CAIx) is a measure of the reflected flow signal, modulated by changes in cerebrovascular resistance and compliance. AIM: This pilot study tests the hypothesis that ingestion of an amount of BJ sufficient to raise the blood NO level two-to three-fold, decreases Transcranial Doppler (TCD) measured CAIx...
July 2016: Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research: JCDR
Charles H Hillman, John R Biggan
This manuscript, which arose from the inaugural Tom Rowland Lecture Series at the 2016 North American Society for Pediatric Exercise Medicine conference, provides a brief descriptive review of what is known (i.e., the state of the science) regarding the relation of childhood physical activity (PA) and cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) to brain health, cognition, and academic outcomes. Gaps in the knowledgebase are identified, including characteristics of the PA stimulus that promotes changes in brain and cognition, whether critical periods in development exist in which PA/CRF may have a disproportionately large influence, the understanding of individual difference factors, and the influence upon learning...
September 6, 2016: Pediatric Exercise Science
M A Rahman, M M Zaman, M M Rahman, M Moniruzzaman, B Ahmed, F K Chhobi, N Rahman, M R Akter
Cerebral Palsy (CP) is one of the most common causes of all childhood disorders. There are tone, posture and movements difficulty due to non-progressive damage to the immature brain in CP. The hallmark of CP is a disability in the development of gross motor function (GMF). The influence of gross motor development on fine motor development is more important in early developmental period, specially under three years old and in children with CP. Various therapeutic interventions have been used in the management of GMF development...
July 2016: Mymensingh Medical Journal: MMJ
Shigeya Tanaka, Shin Honda, Hajime Nakano, Yuko Sato, Kazufumi Araya, Haruyasu Yamaguchi
AIM: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of rehabilitation involving group and personal sessions on demented participants. METHODS: This single-blinded randomized controlled trial included 60 elderly participants with dementia in a geriatric health service facility, or R oken. Staff members, who did not participate in the intervention, examined cognitive function, mood, communication ability, severity of dementia, objective quality of life, vitality, and daily behaviour...
September 9, 2016: Psychogeriatrics: the Official Journal of the Japanese Psychogeriatric Society
Youssef Oulhote, Frodi Debes, Sonja Vestergaard, Pal Weihe, Philippe Grandjean
BACKGROUND: Exposure to methylmercury was shown to decrease neural stem cell populations, whereas aerobic fitness has beneficial effects on the adult brain that relies on improved neurogenesis in the hippocampus. OBJECTIVES: To examine the association between aerobic fitness and neurocognitive outcomes at young adult age, along with the potential moderating effect of prenatal exposure to methylmercury. METHODS: At age 22 years, 262 members of a Faroese birth cohort, established in 1986-1987, underwent a graded exercise test of aerobic fitness to measure maximal oxygen uptake (VO2Max)...
September 9, 2016: Environmental Health Perspectives
Lily Riggs, Janine Piscione, Suzanne Laughlin, Todd Cunningham, Brian W Timmons, Kerry S Courneya, Ute Bartels, Jovanka Skocic, Cynthia de Medeiros, Fang Liu, Nicholas Persadie, Katrin Scheinemann, Nadia Scantlebury, Kamila U Szulc, Eric Bouffet, Donald J Mabbott
BACKGROUND: Exercise promotes repair processes in the mouse brain and improves cognition in both mice and humans. It is not known whether these benefits translate to human brain injury, particularly the significant injury observed in children treated for brain tumors. METHODS: We conducted a clinical trial with crossover of exercise training versus no training in a restricted sample of children treated with radiation for brain tumors. The primary outcome was change in brain structure using MRI measures of white matter (ie, fractional anisotropy [FA]) and hippocampal volume [mm(3)])...
August 23, 2016: Neuro-oncology
Ewelina Maliszewska-Cyna, Madelaine Lynch, Jonathan Jordan Oore, Paul Michael Nagy, Isabelle Aubert
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a degenerative disorder characterized by neuronal and vascular dysfunction and progressive cognitive decline. Furthermore, deficits in cerebral glucose metabolism and insulin resistance are being increasingly recognized in AD pathology. Many lifestyle-modifying approaches, including diet and exercise, have yielded promising results in modulating brain morphology and function for the prevention and early treatment of AD. This review focuses on the effects of physical exercise on rescuing cognition and limiting the progression of AD pathology...
August 19, 2016: Current Alzheimer Research
Melanie Hüttenrauch, Gabriela Salinas, Oliver Wirths
There is ample evidence that physical activity exerts positive effects on a variety of brain functions by facilitating neuroprotective processes and influencing neuroplasticity. Accordingly, numerous studies have shown that continuous exercise can successfully diminish or prevent the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease in transgenic mouse models. However, the long-term effect of physical activity on brain health of aging wild-type (WT) mice has not yet been studied in detail...
2016: Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience
Andrew J Murray, Nicholas S Knight, Mark A Cole, Lowri E Cochlin, Emma Carter, Kirill Tchabanenko, Tica Pichulik, Melanie K Gulston, Helen J Atherton, Marie A Schroeder, Robert M J Deacon, Yoshihiro Kashiwaya, M Todd King, Robert Pawlosky, J Nicholas P Rawlins, Damian J Tyler, Julian L Griffin, Jeremy Robertson, Richard L Veech, Kieran Clarke
Ketone bodies are the most energy-efficient fuel and yield more ATP per mole of substrate than pyruvate and increase the free energy released from ATP hydrolysis. Elevation of circulating ketones via high-fat, low-carbohydrate diets has been used for the treatment of drug-refractory epilepsy and for neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease. Ketones may also be beneficial for muscle and brain in times of stress, such as endurance exercise. The challenge has been to raise circulating ketone levels by using a palatable diet without altering lipid levels...
August 15, 2016: FASEB Journal: Official Publication of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
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