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Native plants

Shauna-Lee Chai, Jian Zhang, Amy Nixon, Scott Nielsen
Accounting for climate change in invasive species risk assessments improves our understanding of potential future impacts and enhances our preparedness for the arrival of new non-native species. We combined traditional risk assessment for invasive species with habitat suitability modeling to assess risk to biodiversity based on climate change. We demonstrate our method by assessing the risk for 15 potentially new invasive plant species to Alberta, Canada, an area where climate change is expected to facilitate the poleward expansion of invasive species ranges...
2016: PloS One
Amanda M West, Paul H Evangelista, Catherine S Jarnevich, Nicholas E Young, Thomas J Stohlgren, Colin Talbert, Marian Talbert, Jeffrey Morisette, Ryan Anderson
Early detection of invasive plant species is vital for the management of natural resources and protection of ecosystem processes. The use of satellite remote sensing for mapping the distribution of invasive plants is becoming more common, however conventional imaging software and classification methods have been shown to be unreliable. In this study, we test and evaluate the use of five species distribution model techniques fit with satellite remote sensing data to map invasive tamarisk (Tamarix spp.) along the Arkansas River in Southeastern Colorado...
October 11, 2016: Journal of Visualized Experiments: JoVE
Neha Kumari, Rajesh Kumar, Vandana Mishra, Savita Yadav
CC-NBS-LRR (CNL) plant proteins are related with highly conserved family of disease resistance protein distinguished by a coiled-coil domain, which plays an important role in innate immunity. The present study reports the purification and identification of CNL like protein fragment (CNL-LPF) by two step chromatography and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF/MS), respectively. Furthermore, current study also illustrated the development of polyclonal antibody against purified CNL-LPF, which was used for immunolocalization of CNL-LPF in cytoplasm of cotyledon, using Fluorescence microscopy and Transmission electron microscopy...
October 20, 2016: Protein Journal
Lêniféré Chantal Soro, Sylvie Munier, Yves Pelissier, Lidwine Grosmaire, Rickey Yada, David Kitts, Anin Louise Ocho-Anin Atchibri, Caroline Guzman, Frédéric Boudard, Chantal Menut, Jean Charles Robinson, Patrick Poucheret
ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Lippia multiflora is a plant with nutritional and pharmaco-therapeutic properties that is native to central and occidental Africa. The potential effects of plants on health are associated with their chemical composition. Therefore, the present study aimed to identify chemical variations in essential oils of Lippia multiflora as a function of geographic origin and time of annual harvest to determine optimal chemical profiles for ethno-pharmacotherapeutic applications...
October 17, 2016: Journal of Ethnopharmacology
Alissa J Brown, Douglas H Deutschman, Jessica Braswell, Dana McLaughlin
Granivorous animals may prefer to predate or cache seed of certain plant species over others. Multiple studies have documented preference for larger, non-native seed by granivores. To accomplish this, researchers have traditionally used indirect inference by relating patterns of seed removal to the species composition of the granivorous animal community. To measure seed removal, researchers present seed to granivorous animals in the field using equipment intended to exclude certain animal taxa while permitting access to others...
2016: PloS One
Huong Nguyen, Jerome Vanclay, John Herbohn, Jennifer Firn
There is growing interest in multi-species tropical plantations but little information exists to guide their design and silviculture. The Rainforestation Farming system is the oldest tropical polyculture planting system in the Philippines and provides a unique opportunity to understand the underlying processes affecting tree performance within diverse plantings. Data collected from 85 plots distributed across the 18 mixed-species plantations in the Philippines was used to identify the factors influencing growth, probability of harvest, and death of trees in these complex plantings...
2016: PloS One
Tanja Milotić, Stijn Quidé, Thomas Van Loo, Maurice Hoffmann
Dung beetles form an insect group that fulfils important functions in terrestrial ecosystems throughout the world. These include nutrient cycling through dung removal, soil bioturbation, plant growth, secondary seed dispersal and parasite control. We conducted field experiments at two sites in the northern hemisphere temperate region in which dung removal and secondary seed dispersal were assessed. Dung beetles were classified in three functional groups, depending on their size and dung manipulation method: dwellers, large and small tunnelers...
October 19, 2016: Oecologia
Yann Desfougères, Jean-Michel Poitou, Henri Wróblewski, Laure Béven
Spiralin is the most abundant protein of several species of spiroplasmas, helical, motile bacteria pathogenic for arthropods and plants. This amphiphilic protein is anchored to the outer face of the plasma membrane by a lipoylated N-terminal cysteine. Although spiroplasma pathogenicity in mammals is controversial, it was shown that spiralin is highly immunogenic and endowed with immunomodulatory activity. In this paper, we describe a high performance method for the purification of Spiroplasma melliferum spiralin under non-denaturing conditions...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Chromatography. B, Analytical Technologies in the Biomedical and Life Sciences
Brianna J Klein, Xiaoyan Wang, Gaofeng Cui, Chao Yuan, Maria Victoria Botuyan, Kevin Lin, Yue Lu, Xiaolu Wang, Yue Zhao, Christiane J Bruns, Georges Mer, Xiaobing Shi, Tatiana G Kutateladze
PHF20 is a core component of the lysine acetyltransferase complex MOF (male absent on the first)-NSL (non-specific lethal) that generates the major epigenetic mark H4K16ac and is necessary for transcriptional regulation and DNA repair. The role of PHF20 in the complex remains elusive. Here, we report on functional coupling between methylation readers in PHF20. We show that the plant homeodomain (PHD) finger of PHF20 recognizes dimethylated lysine 4 of histone H3 (H3K4me2) and represents an example of a native reader that selects for this modification...
October 18, 2016: Cell Reports
Katsuaki Hirano, Masahiro Kurosaki, Satoshi Nihei, Hiroki Hasegawa, Suguru Shinoda, Mitsuru Haruki, Nobutaka Hirano
The cellulosome is a supramolecular multienzyme complex comprised of a wide variety of polysaccharide-degrading enzymes and scaffold proteins. The cellulosomal enzymes that bind to the scaffold proteins synergistically degrade crystalline cellulose. Here, we report in vitro reconstitution of the Clostridium thermocellum cellulosome from 40 cellulosomal components and the full-length scaffoldin protein that binds to nine enzyme molecules. These components were each synthesized using a wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system and purified...
October 19, 2016: Scientific Reports
Steven D Karlen, Chengcheng Zhang, Matthew L Peck, Rebecca A Smith, Dharshana Padmakshan, Kate E Helmich, Heather C A Free, Seonghee Lee, Bronwen G Smith, Fachuang Lu, John C Sedbrook, Richard Sibout, John H Grabber, Troy M Runge, Kirankumar S Mysore, Philip J Harris, Laura E Bartley, John Ralph
Angiosperms represent most of the terrestrial plants and are the primary research focus for the conversion of biomass to liquid fuels and coproducts. Lignin limits our access to fibers and represents a large fraction of the chemical energy stored in plant cell walls. Recently, the incorporation of monolignol ferulates into lignin polymers was accomplished via the engineering of an exotic transferase into commercially relevant poplar. We report that various angiosperm species might have convergently evolved to natively produce lignins that incorporate monolignol ferulate conjugates...
October 2016: Science Advances
Simón Menendez-Bravo, Julia Roulet, Martín Sabatini, Santiago Comba, Robert Dunn, Hugo Gramajo, Ana Arabolaza
BACKGROUND: Microbial synthesis of oleochemicals derived from native fatty acid (FA) metabolism has presented significant advances in recent years. Even so, native FA biosynthetic pathways often provide a narrow variety of usually linear hydrocarbons, thus yielding end products with limited structural diversity. To overcome this limitation, we took advantage of a polyketide synthase-based system from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and developed an Escherichia coli platform with the capacity to synthesize multimethyl-branched long-chain esters (MBE) with novel chemical structures...
2016: Biotechnology for Biofuels
Juli Carrillo, Evan Siemann
Plant competition may mediate the impacts of herbivory on invasive plant species through effects on plant growth and defense. This may predictably depend on whether herbivory occurs above or below ground and on relative plant competitive ability. We simulated the potential impact of above- or belowground damage by biocontrol agents on the growth of a woody invader (Chinese tallow tree, Triadica sebifera) through artificial herbivory, with or without competition with a native grass, little bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium)...
October 2016: Ecological Applications: a Publication of the Ecological Society of America
Andres Fuentes-Ramirez, Joseph W Veldman, Claus Holzapfel, Kirk A Moloney
Novel fire regimes are an important cause and consequence of global environmental change that involve interactions among biotic, climatic, and human components of ecosystems. Plant flammability is key to these interactions, yet few studies directly measure flammability or consider how multiple species with different flammabilities interact to produce novel fire regimes. Deserts of the southwestern United States are an ideal system for exploring how novel fire regimes can emerge when fire-promoting species invade ecosystems comprised of species that did not evolve with fire...
October 2016: Ecological Applications: a Publication of the Ecological Society of America
Chhaya M Werner, Kurt J Vaughn, Katharine L Stuble, Kristina Wolf, Truman P Young
The order of species arrival can dramatically alter the trajectory of community development. While there is experimental evidence that priority effects can be important drivers of community structure early on, the persistence and duration of these effects is unclear. Here we report on a community assembly experiment in which a mix of four native grasses and a mix of four native forbs were planted on their own, together, or with one-year priority over the other guild. We found positive effects of priority for both grasses and forbs in the initial years of the experiment...
September 2016: Ecological Applications: a Publication of the Ecological Society of America
Kari E Veblen, Lauren M Porensky, Corinna Riginos, Truman P Young
The widespread replacement of wild ungulate herbivores by domestic livestock in African savannas is composed of two interrelated phenomena: (1) loss or reduction in numbers of individual wildlife species or guilds and (2) addition of livestock to the system. Each can have important implications for plant community dynamics. Yet very few studies have experimentally addressed the individual, combined, and potentially interactive effects of wild vs. domestic herbivore species on herbaceous plant communities within a single system...
September 2016: Ecological Applications: a Publication of the Ecological Society of America
Sara E Kuebbing, Courtney M Patterson, Aimée T Classen, Daniel Simberloff
To maximize limited conservation funds and prioritize management projects that are likely to succeed, accurate assessment of invasive nonnative species impacts is essential. A common challenge to prioritization is a limited knowledge of the difference between the impacts of a single nonnative species compared to the impacts of nonnative species when they co-occur, and in particular predicting when impacts of co-occurring nonnative species will be non-additive. Understanding non-additivity is important for management decisions because the management of only one co-occurring invader will not necessarily lead to a predictable reduction in the impact or growth of the other nonnative plant...
September 2016: Ecological Applications: a Publication of the Ecological Society of America
Alicia G Lydecker, Abhisheak Sharma, Christopher R McCurdy, Bonnie A Avery, Kavita M Babu, Edward W Boyer
INTRODUCTION: Kratom (Mitragyna speciosa), a plant native to Southeast Asia, has been used for centuries for its stimulant and opium-like effects. Mitragynine and 7-hydroxymitragynine, exclusive to M. speciosa, are the alkaloids primary responsible for Kratom's biologic and psychoactive profile, and likely contribute to its problematic use. We purchased several commercially available Kratom analogs for analysis and through our results, present evidence of probable adulteration with the highly potent and addictive plant alkaloid, 7-hydroxymitragynine...
October 17, 2016: Journal of Medical Toxicology: Official Journal of the American College of Medical Toxicology
Solange E Brandão, Patricia Bulbovas, Marcos E L Lima, Marisa Domingos
The tolerance potential against the oxidative injury in native plants from forest ecosystems affected by environmental stressors depends on how efficiently they keep their pro-oxidant/antioxidant balance. Great variations in plant tolerance are expected, highlighting the higher relevance of measuring biochemical leaf trait indicators of oxidative injury in species with similar functions in the forest than in single species. The use of this functional approach seems very useful in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest because it still holds high plant diversity and was the focus of this study...
October 13, 2016: Science of the Total Environment
Vladica Čudić, Dragoslava Stojiljković, Aleksandar Jovović
Phytoremediation is an emerging technology that employs higher plants to cleanup contaminated environments, including metal-polluted soils. Because it produces a biomass rich in extracted toxic metals, further treatment of this biomass is necessary. The aim of our study was to assess the five-year potential of the following native wild plants to produce biomass and remove heavy metals from a polluted site: poplar (Populus ssp.), ailanthus (Ailanthus glandulosa L.), false acacia (Robinia pseudoacacia L.), ragweed (Artemisia artemisiifolia L...
September 1, 2016: Arhiv za Higijenu Rada i Toksikologiju
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