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football injuries

Y Nouma, W Ben Amar, M Zribi, S Bardaa, Z Hammami, S Maatoug
We report a case of a Tunisian footballer who was found dead abroad under suspicious circumstances. The cause of death was, originally, attributed to a lightning strike. The corpse was buried without/autopsy. Over thirty years later, the family requested the exhumation to verify the identity and the cause of death. The exhumation was performed in 2011. DNA profiling from teeth and femur bone samples confirmed the identity of the deceased. The dry bone study revealed defects in the skull and the pelvis evoking firearm injuries...
October 11, 2016: Journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine
Jared J Murray, Colleen M Renier, Jenny J Ahern, Barbara A Elliott
OBJECTIVE: To document neuromuscular training (NMT) availability and its relationship to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in 4 major high school sports by gender, sport, and rural/urban geography, with the hypothesis that increased exposure to NMT would be associated with fewer ACL injuries. DESIGN: A retrospective cohort study. SETTING: All Minnesota high schools identified in the Minnesota State High School League (MSHSL) database for fall 2014 boys' football and soccer, and girls' volleyball and soccer...
October 17, 2016: Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine: Official Journal of the Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine
Lynn Babcock, Cody S Olsen, David M Jaffe, Julie C Leonard
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to ascertain potential factors associated with cervical spine injuries in children injured during sports and recreational activities. METHODS: This is a secondary analysis of a multicenter retrospective case-control study involving children younger than 16 years who presented to emergency departments after blunt trauma and underwent cervical spine radiography. Cases had cervical spine injury from sports or recreational activities (n = 179)...
September 30, 2016: Pediatric Emergency Care
Harry T Mai, Robert J Burgmeier, Sean M Mitchell, Andrew C Hecht, Joseph C Maroon, Gordon W Nuber, Wellington K Hsu
STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study OBJECTIVE.: To determine if the level of a cervical disc herniation (CDH) procedure will uniquely impact performance-based outcomes in elite athletes of the National Football League (NFL). SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Comparative assessments of post-surgical outcomes in NFL athletes with CDH at different levels are unknown. Further, the surgical decision making for these types of injuries in professional football athletes remains controversial...
September 30, 2016: Spine
A Prien, B Prinz, J Dvořák, A Junge
The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of health problems and associated risk factors in former elite female football players. A cross-sectional research design was employed, using an online questionnaire on personal characteristics and health complaints during/after the career. One hundred fifty-two (response rate: 62.0%) former first German league players answered the survey. Around 70% described their current health as good or very good. Over half (57.9%) reported knee problems during the last 4 weeks while exercising and a third (33...
October 17, 2016: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports
Tom Porter, Alison Rushton
BACKGROUND: Injury prevention measures might reduce the impact of injury on footballers and football clubs. Increasing research has evaluated the use of exercise for injury prevention. However, research has focused on adolescent females. No high-quality systematic reviews have evaluated the efficacy of all forms of exercise on preventing injury in adult male football. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to conduct a systematic review to evaluate the efficacy of exercise in preventing injury in adult male football...
December 2015: Sports Medicine—Open
C Steingröver, N Wattie, J Baker, J Schorer
BACKGROUND: Relative age effects (RAEs) typically favour older members within a cohort; however, research suggests that younger players may experience some long-term advantages, such as longer career length. The purposes of this study were to replicate previous findings on RAEs among National Hockey League (NHL) ice hockey players, National Basketball Association (NBA) basketball players and National Football League (NFL) football players and to investigate the influence of relative age on career length in all three sports...
December 2016: Sports Medicine—Open
Lauren V Fortington, Dara M Twomey, Caroline F Finch
BACKGROUND: Head injuries, particularly concussion, are a major cause of concern in many sports, particularly the football codes, driving a need to better understand injury mechanisms and potential methods of prevention. The aim of this study was to describe the mechanisms and follow up care of concussion injuries sustained in adult male community Australian football to identify target areas for prevention and management. METHODS: Secondary analysis of injury data collected in a cluster randomised controlled trial in community Australian football across two states of Australia in 2007 and 2008...
December 2015: Injury Epidemiology
Stephen W Marshall, Kevin M Guskiewicz, Viswanathan Shankar, Michael McCrea, Robert C Cantu
BACKGROUND: The epidemiology of sports-related concussion is not well-described in the literature. This paper presents a descriptive epidemiology of concussion in seven high school and collegiate sports. METHODS: We used the data from Concussion Prevention Initiative (CPI), which enrolled 8905 athletes at 210 high schools and 26 colleges in a prospective cohort study of 7 sports (football, men's and women's soccer, men's and women's lacrosse, and men's and women's ice hockey) between 1999 and 2001...
December 2015: Injury Epidemiology
Graham Kirkwood, Thomas C Hughes, Allyson M Pollock
BACKGROUND: A pilot injury data collection exercise at the emergency departments (EDs) of Oxford University Hospitals National Health Service (NHS) Foundation Trust (OUH) ran from 2012 to 2014 to inform the current development of the new NHS England emergency care data set. METHODS: Data collected at the EDs of OUH 1 January 2012 to 30 March 2014 analysed for Oxford City and Cherwell District Council areas. Data completeness and quality checked against Hospital Episode Statistic (HES) returns...
October 8, 2016: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health
Michael W Collins, Anthony P Kontos, David O Okonkwo, Jon Almquist, Julian Bailes, Mark Barisa, Jeffrey Bazarian, O Josh Bloom, David Brody, Robert Cantu, Javier Cardenas, Jay Clugston, Randall Cohen, Ruben Echemendia, R J Elbin, Richard Ellenbogen, Janna Fonseca, Gerard Gioia, Kevin Guskiewicz, Robert Heyer, Gillian Hotz, Grant L Iverson, Barry Jordan, Geoffrey Manley, Joseph Maroon, Thomas McAllister, Michael McCrea, Anne Mucha, Elizabeth Pieroth, Kenneth Podell, Matthew Pombo, Teena Shetty, Allen Sills, Gary Solomon, Danny G Thomas, Tamara C Valovich McLeod, Tony Yates, Ross Zafonte
BACKGROUND: Conventional management for concussion involves prescribed rest and progressive return to activity. Recent evidence challenges this notion and suggests that active approaches may be effective for some patients. Previous concussion consensus statements provide limited guidance regarding active treatment. OBJECTIVE: To describe the current landscape of treatment for concussion and to provide summary agreements related to treatment to assist clinicians in the treatment of concussion...
October 12, 2016: Neurosurgery
Eric C McCarty, Matthew J Kraeutler, Paula Langner, Shane Cook, Byron Ellis, Jenna M Godfrey
We conducted a study to identify and contrast patterns in the treatment of common injuries that occur in National Football League (NFL) players and National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I football players. Orthopedic team physicians for all 32 NFL and 119 NCAA Division I football teams were asked to complete a survey regarding demographics and preferred treatment of a variety of injuries encountered in football players. Responses were received from 31 (97%) of the 32 NFL and 111 (93%) of the 119 NCAA team physicians...
September 2016: American Journal of Orthopedics
Joseph D Lamplot, Matthew J Matava
Quadriceps and hamstring injuries occur frequently in football and are generally treated conservatively. While return to competition following hamstring strains is relatively quick, a high rate of injury recurrence highlights the importance of targeted rehabilitation and conditioning. This review describes the clinical manifestations of thigh-related soft-tissue injuries seen in football players. Two of these-muscle strains and contusions-are relatively common, while a third condition-the Morel-Lavallée lesion-is a rare, yet relevant injury...
September 2016: American Journal of Orthopedics
Paul Rothenberg, Luis Grau, Lee Kaplan, Michael G Baraga
Football has the highest injury rate amongst popular American sports. Of those injuries that end seasons or careers, the knee is the most common culprit. This is of particular concern because knee injuries are most common in football. This article reviews 4 of the most common knee injuries in American football, with emphasis on epidemiology, risk factors, and treatment outcomes. The injuries reviewed are tears of the anterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament, medial patellofemoral ligament, and posterior cruciate ligament...
September 2016: American Journal of Orthopedics
Andrew R Hsu, Robert B Anderson
Physicians need to be aware of a variety of foot and ankle injuries that commonly occur in American football, including turf toe, Jones fractures, Lisfranc injuries, syndesmotic and deltoid disruption, and Achilles ruptures. These injuries are often complex and require early individual tailoring of treatment and rehabilitation protocols. Successful management and return to play requires early diagnosis, a thorough work-up, and prompt surgical intervention when warranted with meticulous attention to restoration of normal foot and ankle anatomy...
September 2016: American Journal of Orthopedics
Melissa N Womble, Michael W Collins
Major advancements in sport-related concussion (SRC) management have been made across time to improve the safety of contact sports, including football. Nevertheless, these advances are often overlooked due to concerns regarding the potential long-term effects of SRC. Although further research is needed, it is critical that current efforts are focused on better understanding SRC in order to recognize and change ongoing factors leading to prolonged recoveries, increased risk for injury, and potentially long-term effects...
September 2016: American Journal of Orthopedics
Jillian E Sylvester, Luke N Belval, Douglas J Casa, Francis G O'Connor
Football is recognized as a leading contributor to sports injury secondary to the contact collision nature of the endeavor. While direct deaths from head and spine injury remain a significant contributor to the number of catastrophic injuries, indirect deaths (systemic failure) predominate. Exertional heat stroke has emerged as one of the leading indirect causes of death in high school and collegiate football. This review details for the team physician the unique challenge of exercising in the heat to the football player, and the prevention, diagnosis, management, and return-to-play issues pertinent to exertional heat illnesses...
September 2016: American Journal of Orthopedics
Thor S Stead, Vaibhav Rastogi, Vishnumurthy S Hedna, Latha Ganti
OBJECTIVES: This study sought to: 1) estimate the penetrance (in terms of youth coaches being aware of them) of the CDC "Heads Up!" guidelines, 2) determine whether these guidelines changed the coaches' practice, and 3) understand whether these guidelines resulted in a perceived decrease in the number of concussions. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional survey of pediatric sports coaches in the United States designed to assess the impact of the CDC "Heads Up!" GUIDELINES: "Heads Up!" Concussion in Youth Sports is a free, online course available to coaches, parents, and others helping to keep athletes safe from concussions...
August 29, 2016: Curēus
Jorge Delgado, Diego Jaramillo, Nancy A Chauvin
Increased physical activity in childhood has resulted in a large number of sports-related injuries. Although there is overlap between the sports-related injuries seen in pediatric and adult patients, important differences exist in the injury patterns of pediatric patients. These differences are related to the continuous changes in the developing skeleton and its relationship with adjacent soft tissues. The imbalance in strength between the growing bones and the nearby tendons and ligaments makes the bones prone to acute and chronic injuries...
October 2016: Radiographics: a Review Publication of the Radiological Society of North America, Inc
Sarah Stone, Bobby Lee, J Craig Garrison, Damond Blueitt, Kalyssa Creed
BACKGROUND: Recently, female sports participation has increased, and there is a tendency for women to experience more symptoms and variable presentation after sport-related concussion (SRC). The purpose of this study was to determine whether sex differences exist in time to begin a return-to-play (RTP) progression after an initial SRC. HYPOTHESIS: After initial SRC, female athletes (11-20 years old) would take longer to begin an RTP progression compared with age-matched male athletes...
October 3, 2016: Sports Health
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