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ultrasound, point of care

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28441243/emergency-point-of-care-ultrasound-diagnosis-of-retained-soft-tissue-foreign-bodies-in-the-pediatric-emergency-department
#1
Terry Varshney, Charisse W Kwan, Jason W Fischer, Alyssa Abo
The presence of a foreign body (FB), its depth and size, is often indeterminate by clinical examination. Conventional imaging such as a radiograph can fail to visualize soft tissue FBs. We present 2 cases where point-of-care ultrasound was used to detect previously unidentified FBs.
April 24, 2017: Pediatric Emergency Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28435904/spontaneous-elbow-hemarthrosis-identified-by-point-of-care-ultrasound
#2
David C Mackenzie, Scott McCorvey
Traumatic or spontaneous hemarthroses are an important cause of joint effusions, and can complicate innate or acquired coagulopathies. The elbow is an unusual location for a spontaneous hemarthrosis; we describe a previously unreported case of warfarin-induced spontaneous elbow hemarthrosis, diagnosed by point-of-care ultrasound. On the basis of clinical and ultrasound findings arthrocentesis was deferred, and the patient was successfully treated with warfarin reversal and conservative care. Physical examination is unreliable for the detection of a joint effusion, and misdiagnosis and can lead to unnecessary investigation or resource use...
March 2017: Clinical and Experimental Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28435502/inferior-vena-cava-measurement-with-ultrasound-what-is-the-best-view-and-best-mode
#3
Nathan M Finnerty, Ashish R Panchal, Creagh Boulger, Amar Vira, Jason J Bischof, Christopher Amick, David P Way, David P Bahner
INTRODUCTION: Intravascular volume status is an important clinical consideration in the management of the critically ill. Point-of-care ultrasonography (POCUS) has gained popularity as a non-invasive means of intravascular volume assessment via examination of the inferior vena cava (IVC). However, there are limited data comparing different acquisition techniques for IVC measurement by POCUS. The goal of this evaluation was to determine the reliability of three IVC acquisition techniques for volume assessment: sub-xiphoid transabdominal long axis (LA), transabdominal short axis (SA), and right lateral transabdominal coronal long axis (CLA) (aka "rescue view")...
April 2017: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28433951/transesophageal-echocardiography-in-the-evaluation-of-the-trauma-patient-a-trauma-resuscitation-transesophageal-echocardiography-exam
#4
REVIEW
Stefan W Leichtle, Andrew Singleton, Mandeep Singh, Matthew J Griffee, Joshua M Tobin
The point-of-care ultrasound exam has become an essential tool for hemodynamic monitoring and resuscitation in the trauma bay as well as the intensive care unit. Transthoracic ultrasound provides a dynamic assessment of cardiac function, volume status, and fluid responsiveness that offers potential advantage over traditional methods of hemodynamic monitoring. More recently, a focused transthoracic echocardiography exam was described to improve immediate resuscitation of severely injured patients in the trauma bay...
April 7, 2017: Journal of Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28430713/a-national-survey-of-neonatologists-barriers-and-prerequisites-to-introduce-point-of-care-ultrasound-in-neonatal-icus
#5
Hussnain S Mirza, Gregory Logsdon, Anoop Pulickal, Mark Stephens, Rajan Wadhawan
Point-of-care (POC) ultrasound refers to the use of portable imaging. Although POC ultrasound is widely available to the neonatologists in Australia and Europe, neonatologists in the United States report limited availability. Our objective was to seek the US neonatologists' perception of barriers and prerequisites in adopting POC ultrasound in neonatal intensive care units. An online survey link was sent via e-mail to 3000 neonatologists included in the database maintained by the American Academy of Pediatrics...
April 20, 2017: Ultrasound Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28422778/ultrasound-as-a-screening-tool-for-central-venous-catheter-positioning-and-exclusion-of-pneumothorax
#6
Rabia Amir, Ziyad O Knio, Feroze Mahmood, Achikam Oren-Grinberg, Akiva Leibowitz, Ruma Bose, Shahzad Shaefi, John D Mitchell, Muneeb Ahmed, Amit Bardia, Daniel Talmor, Robina Matyal
OBJECTIVES: Although real-time ultrasound guidance during central venous catheter insertion has become a standard of care, postinsertion chest radiograph remains the gold standard to confirm central venous catheter tip position and rule out associated lung complications like pneumothorax. We hypothesize that a combination of transthoracic echocardiography and lung ultrasound is noninferior to chest radiograph when used to accurately assess central venous catheter positioning and screen for pneumothorax...
April 18, 2017: Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28419634/contrast-enhanced-ultrasound-and-elastography-imaging-of-the-neonatal-brain-a-review
#7
REVIEW
Christopher Bailey, Thierry A G M Huisman, Robert M de Jong, Misun Hwang
Neonates presenting with neurologic symptoms require rapid, noninvasive imaging with high spatial resolution and tissue contrast. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is currently the most sensitive and specific imaging modality for evaluation of neurological pathology. This modality does come with several challenges in the neonatal population, namely, the need to transport a possibly critically sick neonate to the MRI suite and the necessity of the neonate to remain still for a significant length of time, occasionally requiring sedation...
April 17, 2017: Journal of Neuroimaging: Official Journal of the American Society of Neuroimaging
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28419618/correspondence-response-to-letter-to-the-editor-ultrasound-assisted-lumbar-puncture-on-infants-in-the-pediatric-emergency-department
#8
Michael Gorn
We would like to thank our reader for his/her interest in our work and continuing support of point-of-care ultrasound in pediatric emergency medicine. Our study was conducted at a large academic emergency department with pediatrics and emergency medicine residents, nurse practitioners who function at or above the level of a senior resident (PGY-3 and 4), and pediatric emergency fellows who function as attending physicians. As a routine, all initial lumbar puncture (LP) attempts are made by learners. This article is protected by copyright...
April 17, 2017: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28419552/feasibility-and-utility-of-portable-ultrasound-during-retrieval-of-sick-preterm-infants
#9
Kathryn Browning Carmo, Tracey Lutz, Mark Greenhalgh, Andrew Berry, Martin Kluckow, Nick Evans
AIM: Document the incidence of haemodynamic pathology in critically ill preterm newborns requiring transport. METHOD: A transport neonatologist performed cardiac and cerebral ultrasound before and after transportation of infants born ≤ 30 weeks gestation. RESULTS: 44 newborns were studied 2008 - 2015, 21 transported by road, 19 by helicopter and 4 by fixed wing. Median birth weight 1130g (680-1960g), median gestation 27 weeks (23-30) and 30/44 were male...
April 17, 2017: Acta Paediatrica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28419046/point-of-care-ultrasound-for-the-regional-anesthesiologist-and-pain-specialist-a-series-introduction
#10
Stephen C Haskins, Jan Boublik, Christopher L Wu
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2017: Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28419018/diagnosis-of-a-posterior-fracture-dislocation-of-the-medial-clavicle-in-an-adolescent-with-point-of-care-ultrasound
#11
Brunhild M Halm, Lindsey T Chaudoin
We report a case of an adolescent patient with medial clavicular tenderness after a fall on the lateral left shoulder. Initial radiographs did not reveal a fracture or dislocation. Point-of-care ultrasound was used to diagnose a posterior clavicular fracture dislocation.
April 18, 2017: Pediatric Emergency Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28416252/hydroceles-not-just-for-men
#12
Danielle Biggs, Amy Patwa, Steve Gohsler
BACKGROUND: Hydroceles develop in females through the canal of Nuck. This canal is formed when the processes vaginalis fails to obliterate during development. The canal of Nuck can lead to the formation of not only hydroceles, but hernias as well. Although physicians typically think of hydroceles occurring in males, on rare occasions, they do occur in females because of this defect. They are often mistaken for incarcerated hernias, making ultrasound an excellent tool to distinguish between them and guide further treatment...
April 14, 2017: Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28412493/the-clinical-impact-and-prevalence-of-emergency-point-of-care-ultrasound-a-prospective-multicentre-study
#13
Xavier Bobbia, Laurent Zieleskiewicz, Christophe Pradeilles, Chloé Hudson, Laurent Muller, Pierre Géraud Claret, Marc Leone, Jean-Emmanuel de La Coussaye
OBJECTIVE: The main objectives of our study were to evaluate the prevalence of emergency point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) use and to assess the impact of POCUS on: diagnostic, therapeutic, patient-orientation and imaging practices. METHODS: This was a one-day, prospective, observational study carried out across multiple centres. Fifty emergency departments (EDs) recorded all POCUS performed over a 24h period. The prevalence of POCUS was defined as the number of POCUS/number of patients seen in all units...
April 12, 2017: Anaesthesia, Critical Care & Pain Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28411935/point-of-care-ultrasound-in-austere-environments-a-complete-review-of-its-utilization-pitfalls-and-technique-for-common-applications-in-austere-settings
#14
REVIEW
Laleh Gharahbaghian, Kenton L Anderson, Viveta Lobo, Rwo-Wen Huang, Cori McClure Poffenberger, Phi D Nguyen
With the advent of portable ultrasound machines, point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) has proven to be adaptable to a myriad of environments, including remote and austere settings, where other imaging modalities cannot be carried. Austere environments continue to pose special challenges to ultrasound equipment, but advances in equipment design and environment-specific care allow for its successful use. This article describes the technique and illustrates pathology of common POCUS applications in austere environments...
May 2017: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28405042/ultrasonographic-measurement-of-optic-nerve-sheath-diameter-a-point-of-care-test-helps-in-prognostication-of-intensive-care-unit-patients
#15
Arnab Banerjee, Renu Bala, Savita Saini
Early identification of elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) is critical to ensuring timely and appropriate management to improve patient outcome. Measurement of the optic nerve sheath diameter by ultrasound is a well studied modality for noninvasive assessment of ICP. Recent studies have shown it to correlate with invasively measured ICP. We utilized this technique in our ICU and found it to be of great help in guiding patient management and predicting the prognosis. A case series of four patients is reported illustrating its utility in ICU patients...
March 2017: Indian Journal of Anaesthesia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28402924/remote-tele-mentored-ultrasound-for-non-physician-learners-using-facetime-a-feasibility-study-in-a-low-income-country
#16
Thomas E Robertson, Andrea R Levine, Avelino C Verceles, Jessica A Buchner, James H Lantry, Alfred Papali, Marc T Zubrow, L Nathalie Colas, Marc E Augustin, Michael T McCurdy
PURPOSE: Ultrasound (US) is a burgeoning diagnostic tool and is often the only available imaging modality in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). However, bedside providers often lack training to acquire or interpret US images. We conducted a study to determine if a remote tele-intensivist could mentor geographically removed LMIC providers to obtain quality and clinically useful US images. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Nine Haitian non-physician health care workers received a 20-minute training on basic US techniques...
April 7, 2017: Journal of Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28383844/-point-of-care-ultrasound-in-emergency-department-a-case-report-of-acute-dyspnea-during-pregnancy
#17
L Marissiaux, M Gensburger, A Tromba, B Duysinx, P Meunier, V D'Orio, A Ghuysen
On the basis of the case report of a pregnant woman with acute pleuritis, this article describes the diagnostic modalities of dyspnea during pregnancy. The utility and effectiveness of bedside ultrasound examination by the emergency physician («POCUS») are reviewed in view of recent literature data. The ultrasound in this case is considered to be the extension of physical examination aiming at providing answers with immediate clinical relevance.
July 2016: Revue Médicale de Liège
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28379901/the-utility-of-teleultrasound-to-guide-acute-patient-management
#18
Christian Becker, Mario Fusaro, Dhruv Patel, Isaac Shalom, William H Frishman, Corey Scurlock
Ultrasound has evolved into a core bedside tool for diagnostic and management purposes for all subsets of adult and pediatric critically-ill patients. Teleintensive care unit coverage has undergone a similar rapid expansion period throughout the United States. Round-the-clock access to ultrasound equipment is very common in today's intensive care unit, but 24/7 coverage with staff trained to acquire and interpret point-of-care ultrasound in real time is lagging behind equipment availability. Medical trainees and physician extenders require attending level supervision to ensure consistent image acquisition and accurate interpretation...
May 2017: Cardiology in Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28376073/point-of-care-ultrasound-diagnosis-of-traumatic-abdominal-wall-hernia
#19
Lori B Bjork, Shawna D Bellew, Tobias Kummer
Traumatic abdominal wall hernias due to blunt abdominal trauma in pediatric patients can pose a diagnostic challenge because of spontaneous hernia reduction. Ultrasonography may be superior to computed tomography for this indication in some cases because of the ability to dynamically and repeatedly assess the area of injury. Herniation can be induced or exaggerated via Valsalva maneuvers, which can facilitate its detection during dynamic assessment. We present the case of a 3-year-old boy who sustained blunt abdominal trauma, with a resultant abdominal wall hernia that was diagnosed using point-of-care ultrasound imaging...
April 4, 2017: Pediatric Emergency Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28376070/diagnosis-of-ingested-foreign-body-in-the-stomach-by-point-of-care-ultrasound-in-the-upright-and-slightly-forward-tilting-position-bowing-position
#20
Motoyoshi Yamamoto, Toru Koyama, Masahiro Agata, Kenjiro Ouchi, Takayuki Kotoku, Yuta Mizuno
We report a case involving accidental ingestion of a marble that was detected by point-of-care ultrasonography of the abdomen with the patient in the upright and slightly forward tilting position, which we term the "bowing position." Using this position for abdominal ultrasonography may be more useful than the usual supine position for such patients.
April 4, 2017: Pediatric Emergency Care
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