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Seizure management

Harshini Manohar, Pooja Patnaik Kuppili, Preeti Kandasamy, Venkatesh Chandrasekaran, Ravi Philip Rajkumar
BACKGROUND: Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder commonly associated with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), the prevalence ranging from 14-70%. The current study attempted to assess the impact of comorbid ADHD in children with ASD, in terms of challenges in diagnosis, treatment, intervention outcomes and parental stress and coping through a naturalistic design. METHODS: Fifty children aged 2-6 years with ASD were recruited, assessed and followed up for six months...
March 2, 2018: Asian Journal of Psychiatry
Vanessa Lin Lin Lee, Brandon Kar Meng Choo, Yin-Sir Chung, Uday P Kundap, Yatinesh Kumari, Mohd Farooq Shaikh
Metabolic epilepsy is a metabolic abnormality which is associated with an increased risk of epilepsy development in affected individuals. Commonly used antiepileptic drugs are typically ineffective against metabolic epilepsy as they do not address its root cause. Presently, there is no review available which summarizes all the treatment options for metabolic epilepsy. Thus, we systematically reviewed literature which reported on the treatment, therapy and management of metabolic epilepsy from four databases, namely PubMed, Springer, Scopus and ScienceDirect...
March 15, 2018: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
Piero Perucca, Ingrid E Scheffer, Michelle Kiley
The International League Against Epilepsy has recently published a new classification of epileptic seizures and epilepsies to reflect the major scientific advances in our understanding of the epilepsies since the last formal classification 28 years ago. The classification emphasises the importance of aetiology, which allows the optimisation of management. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are the main approach to epilepsy treatment and achieve seizure freedom in about two-thirds of patients. More than 15 second generation AEDs have been introduced since the 1990s, expanding opportunities to tailor treatment for each patient...
March 19, 2018: Medical Journal of Australia
Gretchen Hackett, Jodi Brady, Robert P Olympia
Students presenting with syncope and/or seizure occur occasionally in the school setting. Several studies have shown that seizures as well as respiratory distress are the most common medical emergencies that prompt school nurses and staff to contact emergency medical services (EMS) to transport students to the closest emergency department (Knight 1999, Olympia 2005). It is important to develop a differential diagnosis for syncope, to initiate stabilization of the student with life-threatening symptoms, and to triage these students to an appropriate level of care (back to the classroom, home with their guardian with follow-up at their primary health care provider's office, or directly to the closest emergency department via EMS)...
March 1, 2018: NASN School Nurse
S Liyanagedera, R P Williams
The International League Against Epilepsy Classification of the Epilepsies, first presented in 1981, has been widely adopted across the globe. In 2017 it was revised to allow for more robust, specific, flexible and logical classification of seizures. A number of new seizure types are recognised. Classification should be timely as it plays a vital role in the diagnosis and management of patients with epilepsy. Accurate classification also underpins epilepsy research from pathophysiology to public health. Here we review the basic and extended forms of the classification...
December 2017: Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh
Lukman Femi Owolabi, Shehu Sale, Shakirah Desola Owolabi, Aisha Nalado, Muhammad Umar, Aminu Abdullahi Taura
Background: In spite of the overwhelming significance of knowledge of basic elements of electroencephalography (EEG) in its application to the diagnostic workup and the management of patients with suspected or already established generalized epilepsy (GE), there is a dearth of data on the pattern and utility of clinical variables that can independently determine EEG abnormalities in GE. Objective: The study was designed to evaluate the frequency and pattern of EEG abnormality as well as assess the utility of clinical variables in predicting the likelihood of an abnormal EEG in GE...
April 2018: Annals of African Medicine
Lei Zhang, Jian Xu
Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a rare clinical entity associated with systemic lupus erythematosus which characterized by seizure, headache, and altered mental status. The pathophysiology involves subcortical vasogenic edema secondary to hypertension and endothelial damage. PRES is reversible with withdrawal of the offending agent, strict blood pressure control, and treating the underlying disease. We report present here a patient with lupus nephritis who developed PRES following mycophenolate administration...
2018: American Journal of Clinical and Experimental Immunology
Lisa Vaugier, Stanislas Lagarde, Aileen McGonigal, Agnès Trébuchon, Mathieu Milh, Anne Lépine, Didier Scavarda, Romain Carron, Fabrice Bartolomei
Management of patients after initial epilepsy surgical failure is challenging. In this study, we report our experience in using the stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG) method in the reevaluation of patients after initial epilepsy surgical failure. We selected 28 patients examined through SEEG in our department for drug-resistant focal epilepsy following initial epilepsy surgical failure. For each patient, the residual seizure onset zone (rSOZ) as defined by SEEG was classified as either contiguous if the seizure onset zone (SOZ) was focal and close to the surgical cavity (same lobe) or noncontiguous in cases where the SOZ included site(s) distant from the surgical cavity...
March 8, 2018: Epilepsy & Behavior: E&B
Tyvaert Louise
The diagnosis of de novo epilepsy is complex. An accurate diagnostic approach has to be followed based on specific key steps. Epileptic seizure or non-epileptic malaise: risk of diagnosis error around 20%. Facing a first unprovoked seizure, the practitioner has to know the risk factors specifically linked to an increase risk of seizure recurrence. In presence of these factors, an antiepileptic drug would be indicated. The first antiepileptic drug has to be highly selected according to the epilepsy type and causes but also to the patient characteristics (sex, age, comorbidities, associated drugs, profession, and way of life…) An exhaustive patient Education needs to support the first antiepileptic drug prescription: (sleep and nutritional advices, benefit of observance, antiepileptic drugs features and side effects, follow-up, prognosis…) A regular follow-up is essential to control the observance, tolerability and efficacy of the antiepileptic drug, and to control also the good acceptance of the disease...
March 8, 2018: La Presse Médicale
Sophie Dupont
Catamenial epilepsy, defined as the exacerbation of the frequency of seizures in a given phase of the menstrual cycle, affects 35% of women. In women with catamenial epilepsy with perimenstrual seizures, progesterone therapy may be effective. In case of enzyme inducer AEDs, hormonal contraception is deprecated (estroprogestative or progestative pill, progestative implant, patches or hormonal rings). Because of its high malformative teratogenic potential, its possible depressive cognitive effects and the autistic risk, sodium valproate is not indicated during pregnancy...
March 8, 2018: La Presse Médicale
Michael Owen Kinney, Stephen J Hunt, Ciaran McKenna
INTRODUCTION: Paramedics are increasingly expected to take on wider roles in the management of epilepsy in the community by making nonconveyance decisions after patients have had seizures. Studies have identified barriers to the successful implementation of this clinical role. We sought to determine levels of confidence, training, perceived barriers, and self-identified learning needs and methods to address these needs regarding seizure management. METHODS AND MATERIALS: A questionnaire was developed by consensus and administered to 63 paramedic and prehospital clinicians at various mandatory training days occurring at the central headquarters of the regional ambulance service in Northern Ireland...
March 7, 2018: Epilepsy & Behavior: E&B
Marine Loizon, Sylvain Rheims
Epilepsy is considered as drug-resistant when seizures persist despite the administration of 2 antiepileptic drugs adapted to the patient's needs, with an effective dosage, well-tolerated, whether as a single agent or in combination. Any patient suffering from drug-resistant focal epilepsy should be evaluated at least once in a tertiary epilepsy centre to discuss the appropriateness of a pre-surgical work-up. In drug-resistant epilepsy, the determinants of quality of life are multifactorial and not exclusively linked to the seizure frequency...
March 7, 2018: La Presse Médicale
Naila Ismayilova, Mary-Anne Leung, Ravi Kumar, Martin Smith, Ruth E Williams
PURPOSE: The Ketogenic Diet (KD) is a well-established treatment for epilepsy in children and adults. We describe our 10-year KD experience in children less than two years of age diagnosed with medically refractory epilepsy. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective case-note review of infants managed with KD at our centre between 2006 and 2016. RESULTS: Twenty-nine children between 2½ weeks and 23 months of age were identified, with mixed epilepsy aetiologies...
March 2, 2018: Seizure: the Journal of the British Epilepsy Association
Irene Aicua-Rapun, Pascal Andre, Jan Novy
Epilepsy is considered the most frequent severe neurological condition but most patients treated with medication become seizure free. The management of treatment however is highly empirical, mainly relying on observation. A closed-loop therapy for epilepsy would be very valuable for more efficient treatment regimens. Here we discuss monitoring treatment (therapeutic drug monitoring) and the potential developments in this field, as well as providing a review of potential biomarkers that could be used to monitor the disease activity...
March 8, 2018: Current Neuropharmacology
Arturo Carpio, Agnès Fleury, Matthew L Romo, Ronaldo Abraham
Neurocysticercosis (NC) is a neglected disease that contributes substantially to neurological morbidity/mortality in lower-income countries and increasingly among high-income countries due to migration. Many advances have been made in understanding NC, but unanswered questions remain Areas covered: This review discusses the epidemiology, pathophysiology, immunology, diagnosis, treatment, and eradication of NC. Expert commentary: The global NC prevalence remains unknown and needs proper ascertainment. Further understanding of the pathophysiology of extraparenchymally located cysts is needed to improve management...
March 9, 2018: Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics
Manveer Garcha, Keithan Sivakumar, Mohammed El-Hunjul, Shweta Varade, Hussam A Yacoub
Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is clinically characterized by seizures, changes in vision, altered mental status, and headache, with associated radiologic changes on brain imaging. Intraparenchymal hemorrhage is a rare complication of PRES and an atypical initial presentation of this condition. In this report, we discuss two patients who presented with multifocal cerebral hemorrhages that were later attributed to PRES. We further expand on the pathophysiology, management, and prognosis on patients with hemorrhagic PRES...
March 8, 2018: Hospital Practice (Minneapolis)
Ralph Rahme, Tejaswi D Sudhakar, Marjan Alimi, Timothy G White, Rafael A Ortiz, David J Langer
BACKGROUND AND IMPORTANCE: Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome (CHS) is a well-known complication of superficial temporal artery (STA) to middle cerebral artery (MCA) bypass for ischemic cerebrovascular disease. While this argues against "low flow" in the bypass construct, flow rates in the graft have not been previously quantified in the setting of CHS. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: A 58-yr-old man presented with recurrent left hemispheric ischemic strokes and fluctuating right hemiparesis and aphasia...
March 3, 2018: Operative Neurosurgery (Hagerstown, Md.)
Anita Lwanga, David O Kamson, Tiffany E Wilkins, Vinny Sharma, Jefree J Schulte, James Miller, Ikram Hassan, Ricardo R Lastra
N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis (NMDARe) is one of 13 autoimmune-mediated encephalitides that have been discovered over the last decade. This case report describes the course of a 26-year-old female who presented with new-onset seizures and insomnia, complicated by encephalitis. The initial workup ruled out common causes of encephalitis, while a transvaginal ultrasound (TVUS), and computed tomography (CT) scans of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis did not identify a mass. Based on the suspicion that she may have autoimmune encephalitis, the patient was treated with intravenous immunoglobulins and plasma exchange, but continued to deteriorate...
January 1, 2018: Neuroradiology Journal
Janice Buelow, Wendy Miller, Jesse Fishman
BACKGROUND: Nurses have become increasingly involved in overseeing the management of patients with complex medical conditions, including those with epilepsy. Nurses who are not specialists in epilepsy can play a central role in providing optimal care, education, and support to their patients with epilepsy, given the proper tools. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to create a tool that can be used by nurses in the clinic setting to help facilitate discussion of topics relevant to enhancing medical care and management of patients with epilepsy...
March 3, 2018: Journal of Neuroscience Nursing: Journal of the American Association of Neuroscience Nurses
Erdong Chen, Martha Sajatovic, Hongyan Liu, Ashley Bukach, Curtis Tatsuoka, Elisabeth Welter, Samantha S Schmidt, Yvan A Bamps, Shelley C Stoll, Tanya M Spruill, Daniel Friedman, Charles E Begley, Ross Shegog, Robert T Fraser, Erica K Johnson, Barbara C Jobst
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disease that represents a tremendous burden on both patients and society in general. Studies have addressed how demographic variables, socioeconomic variables, and psychological comorbidity are related to the quality of life (QOL) of people with epilepsy (PWE). However, there has been less focus on how these factors may differ between patients who exhibit varying degrees of seizure control. This study utilized data from the Managing Epilepsy Well (MEW) Network of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention with the aim of elucidating differences in demographic variables, depression, and QOL between adult PWE...
February 28, 2018: Journal of Clinical Neurology
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