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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28927671/quality-language-subdiscipline-and-promotion-were-associated-with-article-accesses-on-physiotherapy-evidence-database-pedro
#1
Tiê P Yamato, Mohit Arora, Matthew L Stevens, Mark R Elkins, Anne M Moseley
OBJECTIVE: To quantify the relationship between the number of times articles are accessed on the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) and the article characteristics. A secondary aim was to examine the relationship between accesses and the number of citations of articles. METHOD: The study was conducted to derive prediction models for the number of accesses of articles indexed on PEDro from factors that may influence an article's accesses. All articles available on PEDro from August 2014 to January 2015 were included...
August 12, 2017: Physiotherapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28924043/dynamic-regulation-of-cdr1-localization-and-phosphorylation-during-osmotic-stress
#2
Hannah E Opalko, James B Moseley
Environmental conditions modulate cell cycle progression in many cell types. A key component of the eukaryotic cell cycle is the protein kinase Wee1, which inhibits the cyclin-dependent kinase Cdk1 in yeast through human cells. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the protein kinase Cdr1 is a mitotic inducer that promotes mitotic entry by phosphorylating and inhibiting Wee1. Cdr1 and Wee1 both localize to punctate structures termed nodes on the medial cortex, but it has been unknown if node localization can be altered by physiological signals...
September 18, 2017: Journal of Biological Chemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28901143/scanning-quadrupole-data-independent-acquisition-part-a-qualitative-and-quantitative-characterization
#3
M Arthur Moseley, Christopher J Hughes, Praveen R Juvvadi, Erik J Soderblom, Sarah Lennon, Simon R Perkins, J Will Thompson, William J Steinbach, Scott J Geromanos, Jason Wildgoose, James I Langridge, Keith Richardson, Johannes P C Vissers
A novel data independent acquisition (DIA) method incorporating a scanning quadrupole in front of a collision cell and orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass analyzer is described. The method has been characterized for the qualitative and quantitative label-free proteomic analysis of typical complex biological samples. The principle of the scanning quadrupole DIA method is discussed and analytical instrument characteristics, such as the quadrupole transmission width, scan/integration time, and chromatographic separation, have been optimized in relation to sample complexity for a number of different model proteomes of varying complexity and dynamic range including human plasma, cell lines, and bacteria...
September 13, 2017: Journal of Proteome Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28890077/occlusion-dose-monitoring-in-amblyopia-therapy-status-insights-and-future-directions
#4
REVIEW
Catherine E Stewart, Merrick J Moseley, Pantelis Georgiou, Alistair R Fielder
Occlusion therapy remains the mainstay treatment of amblyopia, but its outcome is not assured or universally excellent. Many factors are known to influence treatment outcome, among which compliance is foremost. The occlusion dose monitor (ODM) removes one variable from the treatment equation, because it records the occlusion actually received by-rather than prescribed for-the child. Improvement observed can thus be quantitatively related to the patching received. This review summarizes the insights the ODM has provided to date particularly in elucidating the dose-response relationship...
September 7, 2017: Journal of AAPOS: the Official Publication of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28888927/the-effects-of-improving-sleep-on-mental-health-oasis-a-randomised-controlled-trial-with-mediation-analysis
#5
Daniel Freeman, Bryony Sheaves, Guy M Goodwin, Ly-Mee Yu, Alecia Nickless, Paul J Harrison, Richard Emsley, Annemarie I Luik, Russell G Foster, Vanashree Wadekar, Christopher Hinds, Andrew Gumley, Ray Jones, Stafford Lightman, Steve Jones, Richard Bentall, Peter Kinderman, Georgina Rowse, Traolach Brugha, Mark Blagrove, Alice M Gregory, Leanne Fleming, Elaine Walklet, Cris Glazebrook, E Bethan Davies, Chris Hollis, Gillian Haddock, Bev John, Mark Coulson, David Fowler, Katherine Pugh, John Cape, Peter Moseley, Gary Brown, Claire Hughes, Marc Obonsawin, Sian Coker, Edward Watkins, Matthias Schwannauer, Kenneth MacMahon, A Niroshan Siriwardena, Colin A Espie
BACKGROUND: Sleep difficulties might be a contributory causal factor in the occurrence of mental health problems. If this is true, improving sleep should benefit psychological health. We aimed to determine whether treating insomnia leads to a reduction in paranoia and hallucinations. METHODS: We did this single-blind, randomised controlled trial (OASIS) at 26 UK universities. University students with insomnia were randomly assigned (1:1) with simple randomisation to receive digital cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for insomnia or usual care, and the research team were masked to the treatment...
September 6, 2017: Lancet Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28867960/estimating-the-upper-limit-of-prehistoric-peak-ground-acceleration-using-an-in-situ-intact-and-vulnerable-stalagmite-from-plaveck%C3%A3-priepast-cave-detrek%C3%A5-i-zsomboly-little-carpathians-slovakia-first-results
#6
K Gribovszki, K Kovács, P Mónus, G Bokelmann, P Konecny, M Lednická, G Moseley, C Spötl, R L Edwards, M Bednárik, L Brimich, L Tóth
Earthquakes hit urban centres in Europe infrequently, but occasionally with disastrous effects. Obtaining an unbiased view of seismic hazard (and risk) is therefore very important. In principle, the best way to test probabilistic seismic hazard assessments (PSHAs) is to compare them with observations that are entirely independent of the procedure used to produce PSHA models. Arguably, the most valuable information in this context should be information on long-term hazard, namely maximum intensities (or magnitudes) occurring over time intervals that are at least as long as a seismic cycle...
2017: Journal of Seismology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28859059/phase-1-safety-pharmacokinetic-and-pharmacodynamic-study-of-the-cyclin-dependent-kinase-inhibitor-dinaciclib-administered-every-three-weeks-in-patients-with-advanced-malignancies
#7
Monica M Mita, Alain C Mita, Jennifer L Moseley, Jennifer Poon, Karen A Small, Ying-Ming Jou, Paul Kirschmeier, Da Zhang, Yali Zhu, Paul Statkevich, Kamelesh K Sankhala, John Sarantopoulos, James M Cleary, Lucian R Chirieac, Scott J Rodig, Rajat Bannerji, Geoffrey I Shapiro
BACKGROUND: Dinaciclib is a potent inhibitor of cell cycle and transcriptional cyclin-dependent kinases. This Phase 1 study evaluated the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of various dosing schedules of dinaciclib in advanced solid tumour patients and assessed Pharmacodynamic and preliminary anti-tumour activity. METHODS: In part 1, patients were enrolled in escalating cohorts of 2-h infusions administered once every 3 weeks, utilising an accelerated titration design until a recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D) was defined...
August 31, 2017: British Journal of Cancer
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28851924/feeling-stiffness-in-the-back-a-protective-perceptual-inference-in-chronic-back-pain
#8
Tasha R Stanton, G Lorimer Moseley, Arnold Y L Wong, Gregory N Kawchuk
Does feeling back stiffness actually reflect having a stiff back? This research interrogates the long-held question of what informs our subjective experiences of bodily state. We propose a new hypothesis: feelings of back stiffness are a protective perceptual construct, rather than reflecting biomechanical properties of the back. This has far-reaching implications for treatment of pain/stiffness but also for our understanding of bodily feelings. Over three experiments, we challenge the prevailing view by showing that feeling stiff does not relate to objective spinal measures of stiffness and objective back stiffness does not differ between those who report feeling stiff and those who do not...
August 29, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28837064/hepatocyte-growth-factor-mediates-enhanced-wound-healing-responses-and-resistance-to-transforming-growth-factor-%C3%AE-%C3%A2-driven-myofibroblast-differentiation-in-oral-mucosal-fibroblasts
#9
Jordanna Dally, Jabur S Khan, Alex Voisey, Chrisandrea Charalambous, Hannah L John, Emma L Woods, Robert Steadman, Ryan Moseley, Adam C Midgley
Oral mucosal wounds are characterized by rapid healing with minimal scarring, partly attributable to the "enhanced" wound healing properties of oral mucosal fibroblasts (OMFs). Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a pleiotropic growth factor, with potential key roles in accelerating healing and preventing fibrosis. HGF can exist as full-length or truncated (HGF-NK), NK1 and NK2 isoforms. As OMFs display elevated HGF expression compared to dermal fibroblasts (DFs), this study investigated the extent to which HGF mediates the preferential cellular functions of OMFs, and the influence of pro-fibrotic, transforming growth factor-β₁ (TGF-β₁) on these responses...
August 24, 2017: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28827315/pain-in-elite-athletes-neurophysiological-biomechanical-and-psychosocial-considerations-a-narrative-review
#10
REVIEW
Brian Hainline, Judith A Turner, J P Caneiro, Mike Stewart, G Lorimer Moseley
Pain is a common problem among elite athletes and is frequently associated with sport injury. Both injury and pain interfere with peak performance. Pain management should be based on the physiological, anatomical and psychosocial influences on the individual's pain and is not equivalent to injury management, which focuses on musculoskeletal recovery and return-to-play. This narrative review provides a foundation for understanding the differing causes and types of pain in elite athletes, thereby serving as a springboard for comprehensive pain management...
September 2017: British Journal of Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28827314/international-olympic-committee-consensus-statement-on-pain-management-in-elite-athletes
#11
Brian Hainline, Wayne Derman, Alan Vernec, Richard Budgett, Masataka Deie, Jiří Dvořák, Chris Harle, Stanley A Herring, Mike McNamee, Willem Meeuwisse, G Lorimer Moseley, Bade Omololu, John Orchard, Andrew Pipe, Babette M Pluim, Johan Ræder, Christian Siebert, Mike Stewart, Mark Stuart, Judith A Turner, Mark Ware, David Zideman, Lars Engebretsen
Pain is a common problem among elite athletes and is frequently associated with sport injury. Both pain and injury interfere with the performance of elite athletes. There are currently no evidence-based or consensus-based guidelines for the management of pain in elite athletes. Typically, pain management consists of the provision of analgesics, rest and physical therapy. More appropriately, a treatment strategy should address all contributors to pain including underlying pathophysiology, biomechanical abnormalities and psychosocial issues, and should employ therapies providing optimal benefit and minimal harm...
September 2017: British Journal of Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28815397/detecting-and-accounting-for-multiple-sources-of-positional-variance-in-peak-list-registration-analysis-and-spin-system-grouping
#12
Andrey Smelter, Eric C Rouchka, Hunter N B Moseley
Peak lists derived from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra are commonly used as input data for a variety of computer assisted and automated analyses. These include automated protein resonance assignment and protein structure calculation software tools. Prior to these analyses, peak lists must be aligned to each other and sets of related peaks must be grouped based on common chemical shift dimensions. Even when programs can perform peak grouping, they require the user to provide uniform match tolerances or use default values...
August 16, 2017: Journal of Biomolecular NMR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28812285/the-reliability-of-eyetracking-to-assess-attentional-bias-to-threatening-words-in-healthy-individuals
#13
Ian W Skinner, Markus Hübscher, G Lorimer Moseley, Hopin Lee, Benedict M Wand, Adrian C Traeger, Sylvia M Gustin, James H McAuley
Eyetracking is commonly used to investigate attentional bias. Although some studies have investigated the internal consistency of eyetracking, data are scarce on the test-retest reliability and agreement of eyetracking to investigate attentional bias. This study reports the test-retest reliability, measurement error, and internal consistency of 12 commonly used outcome measures thought to reflect the different components of attentional bias: overall attention, early attention, and late attention. Healthy participants completed a preferential-looking eyetracking task that involved the presentation of threatening (sensory words, general threat words, and affective words) and nonthreatening words...
August 15, 2017: Behavior Research Methods
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28800332/cerebral-oxidative-stress-and-microvasculature-defects-in-tnf-%C3%AE-expressing-transgenic-and-porphyromonas-gingivalis-infected-apoe-mice
#14
Farheen Rokad, Ryan Moseley, Rowan S Hardy, Sasanka Chukkapalli, StJohn Crean, Lakshmyya Kesavalu, Sim K Singhrao
The polymicrobial dysbiotic subgingival biofilm microbes associated with periodontal disease appear to contribute to developing pathologies in distal body sites, including the brain. This study examined oxidative stress, in the form of increased protein carbonylation and oxidative protein damage, in the tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) transgenic mouse that models inflammatory TNF-α excess during bacterial infection; and in the apolipoprotein knockout (ApoE-/-) mouse brains, following Porphyromonas gingivalis gingival monoinfection...
August 8, 2017: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease: JAD
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28783459/relevant-research-from-non-orthodontic-journals
#15
Sara Stephens, Howard Moseley
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 7, 2017: Journal of Orthodontics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28779873/spatially-defined-motor-deficits-in-people-with-unilateral-complex-regional-pain-syndrome
#16
Emily J Reid, Felicity A Braithwaite, Sarah B Wallwork, Daniel Harvie, K Jane Chalmers, Charles Spence, Alberto Gallace, G Lorimer Moseley
OBJECTIVE: Spatially-defined disruption of autonomic and sensory function has been identified in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS). This study aimed to determine whether motor performance is also disrupted in a spatially-defined manner in people with CRPS. METHODS: Thirteen people with CRPS type 1 of the upper limb participated in two motor experiments. In Experiment 1 participants performed a circle drawing task that primarily tested motor accuracy. In Experiment 2 participants performed a button pressing task that tested motor co-ordination...
July 14, 2017: Cortex; a Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System and Behavior
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28777701/a-pet-mr-imaging-approach-for-the-integrated-assessment-of-chemotherapy-induced-brain-heart-and-bone-injuries-in-pediatric-cancer-survivors-a-pilot-study
#17
Ashok J Theruvath, Anat Ilivitzki, Anne Muehe, Johanna Theruvath, Praveen Gulaka, Christine Kim, Sandra Luna-Fineman, Kathleen M Sakamoto, Kristen W Yeom, Phillip Yang, Michael Moseley, Frandics Chan, Heike E Daldrup-Link
Purpose To develop a positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance (MR) imaging protocol for evaluation of the brain, heart, and joints of pediatric cancer survivors for chemotherapy-induced injuries in one session. Materials and Methods Three teams of experts in neuroimaging, cardiac imaging, and bone imaging were tasked to develop a 20-30-minute PET/MR imaging protocol for detection of chemotherapy-induced tissue injuries of the brain, heart, and bone. In an institutional review board-approved, HIPAA-compliant, prospective study from April to July 2016, 10 pediatric cancer survivors who completed chemotherapy underwent imaging of the brain, heart, and bone with a 3-T PET/MR imager...
August 4, 2017: Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28747106/citation-of-prior-research-has-increased-in-introduction-and-discussion-sections-with-time-a-survey-of-clinical-trials-in-physiotherapy
#18
Xenia Hoderlein, Anne M Moseley, Mark R Elkins
BACKGROUND/AIMS: Many clinical trials are reported without reference to the existing relevant high-quality research. This study aimed to investigate the extent to which authors of reports of clinical trials of physiotherapy interventions try to use high-quality clinical research to (1) help justify the need for the trial in the introduction and (2) help interpret the trial's results in the discussion. METHODS: Data were extracted from 221 clinical trials that were randomly selected from the Physiotherapy Evidence Database: 70 published in 2001 (10% sample) and 151 published in 2015 (10% sample)...
August 2017: Clinical Trials: Journal of the Society for Clinical Trials
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28742766/exploration-into-the-business-priorities-related-to-corporate-engagement-in-community-health-improvement-partnerships
#19
Nicolaas P Pronk, Catherine Baase, Jeanette May, Paul Terry, Karen Moseley
OBJECTIVE: To explore factors that matter to business in making decisions regarding engagement in community health improvement efforts. METHODS: Using qualitative methods, domains of interest were identified through literature reviews and expert interviews. Relevance of the domains in terms of potential priorities for action was tested through employer and community stakeholder interviews. RESULTS: Factors that employers considered important to sustained community collaboration as a business priority included (1) credibility of the convener, (2) broad representation of the community, (3) strong mission and goals, (4) individual commitment to health, (5) organizational commitment to health, and (6) demonstrated commitment from leadership...
July 24, 2017: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28724682/from-the-memphis-model-to-the-north-carolina-way-lessons-learned-from-emerging-health-system-and-faith-community-partnerships
#20
Teresa Cutts, Gary Gunderson, Dean Carter, Melanie Childers, Phillip Long, Lisa Marisiddaiah, Helen Milleson, Dennis Stamper, Annika Archie, Jeremy Moseley, Emily Viverette, Bobby Baker
National health care policy has encouraged health systems to develop community partnerships designed to decrease costs and readmissions, particularly for underserved populations. This commentary describes and compares the Congregational Health Network's Memphis Model to early local efforts at clinical-faith community partnerships in North Carolina, which we call "The North Carolina Way." Necessary components for building robust health system and congregational partnerships to address social determinants of health and impact health care utilization include partnership growth, allocation of health system resources, community trust, and time...
July 2017: North Carolina Medical Journal
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