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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28538515/effect-of-exposure-to-short-wavelength-light-on-susceptibility-to-motion-sickness
#1
Kyungshil Kim, Kazumi Hirayama, Kazuki Yoshida, Rika Yano, Masayuki Abe, Mika Otsuki, Satoshi Sakuraba, Shinya Sakai
This randomized cross-over study tested the hypothesis that exposure to short-wavelength light induces symptoms of motion sickness (MS). The study participants were 28 healthy adults (14 women; mean age±SD, 25.96±3.11 years). Two stimuli oscillating within a range of 0.4-0.6 Hz were used to induce MS: a blue wave stimulus with short-wavelength light (460 nm) and a green wave stimulus with middle-wavelength light (555 nm). All participants were exposed to both stimuli throughout two separate periods...
May 19, 2017: Neuroreport
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28534604/the-influence-of-expectations-on-improvements-in-pain-and-function-in-patients-with-neck-back-shoulder-complaints-a-cohort-study
#2
Sigrid Skatteboe, Cecilie Røe, Morten W Fagerland, Lars-Petter Granan
BACKGROUND: In musculoskeletal research, patients' expectations have recently received increased attention. However, few prospective studies have investigated these expectations or their prognostic significance and possible clinical value. AIM: To investigate the influence of patients' expectations on improvements in pain and functional status six months after an outpatient physical medicine assessment. DESIGN: A prospective cohort study. SETTING: Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PMR) outpatient clinic...
May 23, 2017: European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28534181/assessing-decision-making-capacity-for-do-not-resuscitate-requests-in-depressed-patients-how-to-apply-the-communication-and-appreciation-criteria
#3
Benjamin D Brody, Ellen C Meltzer, Diana Feldman, Julie B Penzner, Janna S Gordon-Elliot
The Patient Self Determination Act (PSDA) of 1991 brought much needed attention to the importance of advance care planning and surrogate decision-making. The purpose of this law is to ensure that a patient's preferences for medical care are recognized and promoted, even if the patient loses decision-making capacity (DMC). In general, patients are presumed to have DMC. A patient's DMC may come under question when distortions in thinking and understanding due to illness, delirium, depression or other psychiatric symptoms are identified or suspected...
May 22, 2017: HEC Forum: An Interdisciplinary Journal on Hospitals' Ethical and Legal Issues
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28534035/internal-medicine-resident-perspectives-regarding-broad-spectrum-antibiotic-usage
#4
Ann M Laake, Gayle Bernabe, James Peterson, Angelike P Liappis
Focus groups held with internal medicine residents discussed their perspectives regarding broad-spectrum antibiotic (BSA) usage. Residents knew of BSA-associated adverse events, but they did not associate such events with increased patient morbidity and mortality, and they were more likely to use BSA in situations with diagnostic uncertainty and sick patients.
2017: Open Forum Infectious Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28533889/effects-of-low-dose-acetazolamide-on-exercise-performance-in-simulated-altitude
#5
Ernst Elisabeth, Gatterer Hannes, Burtscher Johannes, Faulhaber Martin, Pocecco Elena, Burtscher Martin
Preventive effects of acetazolamide (ACZ) on acute mountain sickness (AMS) are well established but effects on exercise performance at high altitude or in hypoxia have been less considered and are still inconsistent. We hypothesized that low-dose ACZ would not impair exercise performance at simulated high altitude. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the interaction between low-dose ACZ and exercise performance in normobaric hypoxia. Sixteen subjects (8 males and 8 females) were randomly assigned either to receive low-dose ACZ (3×125 mg in 36 hours) or placebo...
2017: International Journal of Physiology, Pathophysiology and Pharmacology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28533402/behavioral-and-neural-correlates-to-multisensory-detection-of-sick-humans
#6
Christina Regenbogen, John Axelsson, Julie Lasselin, Danja K Porada, Tina Sundelin, Moa G Peter, Mats Lekander, Johan N Lundström, Mats J Olsson
Throughout human evolution, infectious diseases have been a primary cause of death. Detection of subtle cues indicating sickness and avoidance of sick conspecifics would therefore be an adaptive way of coping with an environment fraught with pathogens. This study determines how humans perceive and integrate early cues of sickness in conspecifics sampled just hours after the induction of immune system activation, and the underlying neural mechanisms for this detection. In a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover design, the immune system in 22 sample donors was transiently activated with an endotoxin injection [lipopolysaccharide (LPS)]...
May 22, 2017: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28533161/differences-in-symptom-clusters-identified-using-ratings-of-symptom-occurrence-versus-severity-in-lung-cancer-patients-receiving-chemotherapy
#7
Melisa L Wong, Bruce A Cooper, Steven M Paul, Jon D Levine, Yvette P Conley, Fay Wright, Marilyn Hammer, Christine Miaskowski
CONTEXT: An important question in symptom clusters research is whether the number and types of symptom clusters vary based on the specific dimension of the symptom experience used to create the clusters. OBJECTIVES: Given that lung cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy (CTX) report an average of 14 co-occurring symptoms and studies of symptom clusters in these patients are limited, the purpose of this study, in lung cancer patients undergoing CTX (n=145), was to identify whether the number and types of symptom clusters differed based on whether symptom occurrence rates or symptom severity ratings were used to create the clusters...
May 19, 2017: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28533143/drugs-in-space-pharmacokinetics-and-pharmacodynamics-in-astronauts
#8
Johannes Kast, Yichao Yu, Christoph N Seubert, Virginia E Wotring, Hartmut Derendorf
Space agencies are working intensely to push the current boundaries of human spaceflight by sending astronauts deeper into space than ever before, including missions to Mars and asteroids. Spaceflight alters human physiology due to fluid shifts, muscle and bone loss, immune system dysregulation, and changes in the gastrointestinal tract and metabolic enzymes. These alterations may change the pharmacokinetics and/or pharmacodynamics of medications used by astronauts and subsequently might impact drug efficacy and safety...
May 19, 2017: European Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28532613/the-practice-of-evidence-based-medicine-involves-the-care-of-whole-persons
#9
W Scott Richardson
In this issue of the Journal, Dr. Fava posits that evidence-based medicine (EBM) was bound to fail. I share some of the concerns he expresses, yet I see more reasons for optimism. Having been on rounds with both Drs. Engel and Sackett, I reckon they would have agreed more than they disagreed. Their central teaching was the compassionate and well-informed care of sick persons. The model that emerged from these rounds was that patient care could be both person-centered and evidence-based, that clinical judgment was essential to both, and the decisions could and should be shared...
April 2017: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28532502/perceived-reciprocal-value-of-health-professionals-participation-in-global-child-health-related-work
#10
Sarah Carbone, Jannah Wigle, Nadia Akseer, Raluca Barac, Melanie Barwick, Stanley Zlotkin
BACKGROUND: Leading children's hospitals in high-income settings have become heavily engaged in international child health research and educational activities. These programs aim to provide benefit to the institutions, children and families in the overseas locations where they are implemented. Few studies have measured the actual reciprocal value of this work for the home institutions and for individual staff who participate in these overseas activities. Our objective was to estimate the perceived reciprocal value of health professionals' participation in global child health-related work...
May 22, 2017: Globalization and Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28532450/lps-induced-systemic-inflammation-reveals-an-immunomodulatory-role-for-the-prion-protein-at-the-blood-brain-interface
#11
Ø Salvesen, M R Reiten, A Espenes, M K Bakkebø, M A Tranulis, C Ersdal
BACKGROUND: The cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) is an evolutionary conserved protein abundantly expressed not only in the central nervous system but also peripherally including the immune system. A line of Norwegian dairy goats naturally devoid of PrP(C) (PRNP (Ter/Ter)) provides a novel model for studying PrP(C) physiology. METHODS: In order to explore putative roles for PrP(C) in acute inflammatory responses, we performed a lipopolysaccharide (LPS, Escherichia coli O26:B6) challenge of 16 goats (8 PRNP (+/+) and 8 PRNP (Ter/Ter)) and included 10 saline-treated controls (5 of each PRNP genotype)...
May 22, 2017: Journal of Neuroinflammation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28531819/welfare-consequences-for-people-with-epilepsy-and-their-partners-a-matched-nationwide-study-in-denmark
#12
Poul Jennum, Anne Sabers, Jakob Christensen, Rikke Ibsen, Jakob Kjellberg
PURPOSE: We aimed to evaluate the excess direct and indirect costs associated with epilepsy. METHODS: From the Danish National Patient Registry (1998-2013), we identified people within all ages with an epilepsy diagnosis and matched them to control individuals. Additionally, partners of people with epilepsy were identified, who were compared with control partners. Direct costs included frequencies and costs of hospitalizations and weighted outpatient use according to diagnosis-related group, and specific outpatient costs based on data from the Danish Ministry of Health...
May 12, 2017: Seizure: the Journal of the British Epilepsy Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28531363/beneficial-effect-of-enriched-air-nitrox-on-bubble-formation-during-scuba-diving-an-open-water-study
#13
Anne-Kathrin Brebeck, Andreas Deussen, Ursula Range, Costantino Balestra, Sinclair Cleveland, Jochen D Schipke
Bubble formation during scuba diving might induce decompression sickness. This prospective randomised and double-blind study included 108 advanced recreational divers (38 females). Fifty-four pairs of divers, 1 breathing air and the other breathing nitrox28 undertook a standardised dive (24 ± 1 msw; 62 ± 5min) in the Red Sea. Venous gas bubbles were counted (Doppler) 30-<45 min (early) and 45-60 min (late) post-dive at jugular, subclavian and femoral sites. Only 7% (air) vs. 11% (air28®) (n.s.) were bubble-free after a dive...
May 21, 2017: Journal of Sports Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28531152/genetic-testing-among-children-in-a-complex-care-program
#14
Krista Oei, Robin Z Hayeems, Wendy J Ungar, Ronald D Cohn, Eyal Cohen
Little is known about the pattern of genetic testing and frequency of genetic diagnoses among children enrolled in structured complex care programs (CCPs). Such information may inform the suitability of emerging genome diagnostics for this population. The objectives were to describe the proportion of children with undiagnosed genetic conditions despite genetic testing and measure the testing period, types and costs of genetic tests used. A retrospective analysis of 420 children enrolled in Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children's CCP from January 2010 until June 2014 was conducted...
May 22, 2017: Children
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28530462/using-yoga-nidra-to-improve-stress-in-psychiatric-nurses-in-a-pilot-study
#15
Roberta Anderson, Kristine Mammen, Padmini Paul, Allisyn Pletch, Kathleen Pulia
Given today's hurried and stressful heathcare system, nurses need mechanisms to take care of themselves, promote their own wellness, and build resilience in managing sick patients. Yoga is one such mechanism; it can decrease anxiety and improve sleep and quality of life. In this pilot study, nine nurses participated in 6 weekly sessions of yoga nidra. Measures of sleep, stress, and muscle fatigue were obtained to determine whether yoga had a positive impact upon quality of life and stress. Although based on a small sample of nurses, results indicated positive findings for both perceived stress level and muscle fatigue...
May 22, 2017: Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine: Research on Paradigm, Practice, and Policy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28530171/the-implications-of-psychological-symptoms-for-length-of-sick-leave
#16
Antonius Schneider, Sven Hilbert, Johannes Hamann, Svenja Skadsem, Jürgen Glaser, Bernd Löwe, Markus Bühner
BACKGROUND: In this cross-sectional study, we aimed to determine the relation between sick leave duration, burnout symptoms, depression, anxiety, and somatization in a primary care setting. METHODS: Patients receiving a sickness certificate in one of 14 participating primary care practices were consecutively asked by their primary care physician to fill in a questionnaire comprising the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey (MBI-GS) and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ) containing the depression (PHQ-9), somatization (PHQ-15), and anxiety (GAD-7) scales...
April 28, 2017: Deutsches Ärzteblatt International
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28529236/-all-in-the-day-s-work-cold-war-doctoring-and-its-discontents-in-william-burroughs-s-i-naked-lunch-i
#17
Michael Jarvis
In Naked Lunch, the institutions and practices of science and medicine, specifically with regard to psychiatry/psychology, are symptoms of a bureaucratic system of control that shapes, constructs, defines, and makes procrustean alterations to both the mind and body of human subjects. Using sickness and junk (or heroin) as convenient metaphors for both a Cold War binary mentality and the mandatory consumption of twentieth-century capitalism, Burroughs presents modern man as fundamentally alienated from any sense of a personal self...
2017: Literature and Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28526310/working-with-influenza-like-illness-presenteeism-among-us-health-care-personnel-during-the-2014-2015-influenza-season
#18
Sophia Chiu, Carla L Black, Xin Yue, Stacie M Greby, A Scott Laney, Angela P Campbell, Marie A de Perio
BACKGROUND: Health care personnel (HCP) working while experiencing influenza-like illness (ILI) contribute to influenza transmission in health care settings. Studies focused on certain HCP occupations or work settings have demonstrated that some HCP often continue to work while ill. METHODS: Using a national nonprobability Internet panel survey of 1,914 HCP during the 2014-2015 influenza season, we calculated the frequency of working with self-reported ILI (ie, fever and cough or sore throat) and examined reasons for working with ILI by occupation and work setting...
May 16, 2017: American Journal of Infection Control
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28525417/assessing-frailty-in-patients-undergoing-destination-therapy-left-ventricular-assist-device-observations-from-interagency-registry-for-mechanically-assisted-circulatory-support
#19
Lauren B Cooper, Bradley G Hammill, Larry A Allen, JoAnn Lindenfeld, Robert J Mentz, Joseph G Rogers, Carmelo A Milano, Chetan B Patel, Karen P Alexander, Adrian F Hernandez
Frailty and heart failure share common pathways with symptoms that often coexist. Assessment of frailty may inform patient selection for left ventricular assist device (LVAD) therapy. Using Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support (INTERMACS) data of destination therapy (DT) LVAD patients from January 1, 2012, to March 31, 2014, we examined preimplantation provider-assessed frailty and gait speed testing and the association with 1 year postimplantation outcomes. Of 2,469 patients, 227 (9...
May 18, 2017: ASAIO Journal: a Peer-reviewed Journal of the American Society for Artificial Internal Organs
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28525326/short-term-heart-rate-variability-in-dogs-with-sick-sinus-syndrome-or-chronic-mitral-valve-disease-as-compared-to-healthy-controls
#20
Sz Bogucki, A Noszczyk-Nowak
Heart rate variability is an established risk factor for mortality in both healthy dogs and animals with heart failure. The aim of this study was to compare short-term heart rate variability (ST-HRV) parameters from 60-min electrocardiograms in dogs with sick sinus syndrome (SSS, n=20) or chronic mitral valve disease (CMVD, n=20) and healthy controls (n=50), and to verify the clinical application of ST-HRV analysis. The study groups differed significantly in terms of both time - and frequency- domain ST-HRV parameters...
March 28, 2017: Polish Journal of Veterinary Sciences
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