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cold adaptation

John E Pool, Dylan T Braun, Justin B Lack
Drosophila melanogaster originated in tropical Africa before expanding into strikingly different temperate climates in Eurasia and beyond. Here, we find elevated cold tolerance in three distinct geographic regions: beyond the well-studied non-African case, we show that populations from the highlands of Ethiopia and South Africa have significantly increased cold tolerance as well. We observe greater cold tolerance in outbred versus inbred flies, but only in populations with higher inversion frequencies. Each cold-adapted population shows lower inversion frequencies than a closely-related warm-adapted population, suggesting that inversion frequencies may decrease with altitude in addition to latitude...
October 24, 2016: Molecular Biology and Evolution
Zhao Li, Guanghui Hu, Xiangfeng Liu, Yao Zhou, Yu Li, Xu Zhang, Xiaohui Yuan, Qian Zhang, Deguang Yang, Tianyu Wang, Zhiwu Zhang
Originating in a tropical climate, maize has faced great challenges as cultivation has expanded to the majority of the world's temperate zones. In these zones, frost and cold temperatures are major factors that prevent maize from reaching its full yield potential. Among 30 elite maize inbred lines adapted to northern China, we identified two lines of extreme, but opposite, freezing tolerance levels-highly tolerant and highly sensitive. During the seedling stage of these two lines, we used RNA-seq to measure changes in maize whole genome transcriptome before and after freezing treatment...
2016: Frontiers in Plant Science
Barbara Jurczyk, Ewa Pociecha, Franciszek Janowiak, Dawid Kabała, Marcin Rapacz
According to predicted changes in climate, waterlogging events may occur more frequently in the future during autumn and winter at high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere. If excess soil water coincides with the process of cold acclimation for plants, winter survival may potentially be affected. The effects of waterlogging during cold acclimation on stomatal aperture, relative water content, photochemical activity of photosystem II, freezing tolerance and plant regrowth after freezing were compared for two prehardened overwintering forage grasses, Lolium perenne and Festuca pratensis...
October 14, 2016: Plant Physiology and Biochemistry: PPB
C-L Wu, B-Y Li, J-L Wu, C-F Hui
Environment temperature highly influences the physiological condition of poikilothermic teleost. There are different physiological and biochemical responses between fish in different habitats. In order to take profit of fish adapted to different temperatures, some important enzymes have been isolated, assayed, and analyzed. Enzyme expression patterns and properties were evaluated in lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, and stearoyl-CoA desaturase studies. In this chapter, we try to identify the mechanisms of enzyme activity at low temperature by comparing different studies on enzyme kinetics and regulation...
2016: Advances in Food and Nutrition Research
Cristina Baglivo, Paolo Maria Congedo
Data are related to the multi-objective optimization process applied to the building materials to obtain high energy-efficient precast walls for cold climate. The methodology has been explained on the paper entitled "High performance precast external walls for cold climate by a multi criteria methodology" (Baglivo and Congedo, 2016) [1]. The modeFRONTIER rel.4.3 optimization tool has been used to evaluate the dynamic behaviour of the building components in accordance with the UNI EN ISO 13786:2008 and to obtain a multitude of high efficiency configurations...
December 2016: Data in Brief
Vendela K Lagerholm, Edson Sandoval-Castellanos, Amélie Vaniscotte, Olga R Potapova, Teresa Tomek, Zbigniew M Bochenski, Paul Shepherd, Nick Barton, Marie-Claire Van Dyck, Rebecca Miller, Jacob Höglund, Nigel G Yoccoz, Love Dalén, John R Stewart
Global warming is predicted to cause substantial habitat rearrangements, with the most severe effects expected to occur in high-latitude biomes. However, one major uncertainty is whether species will be able to shift their ranges to keep pace with climate-driven environmental changes. Many recent studies on mammals have shown that past range contractions have been associated with local extinctions rather than survival by habitat tracking. Here, we have used an interdisciplinary approach that combines ancient DNA techniques, coalescent simulations and species distribution modelling, to investigate how two common cold-adapted bird species, willow and rock ptarmigan (Lagopus lagopus and Lagopus muta), respond to long-term climate warming...
October 20, 2016: Global Change Biology
Sara Branco, Ke Bi, Hui-Ling Liao, Pierre Gladieux, Hélène Badouin, Christopher E Ellison, Nhu H Nguyen, Rytas Vilgalys, Kabir G Peay, John W Taylor, Thomas D Bruns
Recent advancements in sequencing technology allowed researchers to better address the patterns and mechanisms involved in microbial environmental adaptation at large spatial scales. Here we investigated the genomic basis of adaptation to climate at the continental scale in Suillus brevipes, an ectomycorrhizal fungus symbiotically associated with the roots of pine trees. We used genomic data from 55 individuals in seven locations across North America to perform genome scans to detect signatures of positive selection and assess whether temperature and precipitation were associated with genetic differentiation...
October 20, 2016: Molecular Ecology
Tong Liu, Keping Sun, Yung Chul Park, Jiang Feng
The greater horseshoe bat, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum, is an important model organism for studies on chiropteran phylogeographic patterns. Previous studies revealed the population history of R. ferrumequinum from Europe and most Asian regions, yet there continue to be arguments about their evolutionary process in Northeast Asia. In this study, we obtained mitochondrial DNA cyt b and D-loop data of R. ferrumequinum from Northeast China, South Korea and Japan to clarify their phylogenetic relationships and evolutionary process...
2016: PeerJ
Jianbo Li, Huixia Jia, Xiaojiao Han, Jin Zhang, Pei Sun, Mengzhu Lu, Jianjun Hu
Salix psammophila is a desert shrub willow that has extraordinary adaptation to abiotic stresses and plays an important role in maintaining local ecosystems. Moreover, S. psammophila is regarded as a promising biomass feedstock because of its high biomass yields and short rotation coppice cycle. However, few suitable reference genes (RGs) for quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) constrain the study on normalization of gene expression in S. psammophila until now. Here, we investigated the expression stabilities of 14 candidate RGs across tissue types and under four abiotic stress treatments, including heat, cold, salt, and drought treatments...
2016: Frontiers in Plant Science
Jostein Gohli, Kjetil L Voje
BACKGROUND: Bergmann's rule proposes that animals in cold habitats will be larger than those in warm habitats. This prediction has been tested thoroughly at the intraspecific level, but few studies have investigated the hypothesis with interspecific data using phylogenetic comparative approaches. Many clades of mammals have representatives in numerous distinct biomes, making this order highly suitable for a large-scale interspecific assessment of Bergmann's rule. Here, we evaluate Bergmann's rule within 22 mammalian families-with a dataset that include ~35 % of all described species-using a phylogenetic comparative approach...
October 19, 2016: BMC Evolutionary Biology
Shauna M Baillie, Andrew M Muir, Michael J Hansen, Charles C Krueger, Paul Bentzen
BACKGROUND: Adaptive radiation involving a colonizing phenotype that rapidly evolves into at least one other ecological variant, or ecotype, has been observed in a variety of freshwater fishes in post-glacial environments. However, few studies consider how phenotypic traits vary with regard to neutral genetic partitioning along ecological gradients. Here, we present the first detailed investigation of lake trout Salvelinus namaycush that considers variation as a cline rather than discriminatory among ecotypes...
October 19, 2016: BMC Evolutionary Biology
Leonardo Pellizza, Clara Smal, Raúl E Ithuralde, Adrián G Turjanski, Daniel O Cicero, Martin Aran
The TPM domain constitutes a family of recently characterized protein domains that are present in most living organisms. Although some progress has been made in understanding the cellular role of TPM-containing proteins, the relationship between structure and function it is not clear yet. We have recently solved the solution and crystal structure of one TPM domain (BA42) from the Antarctic bacterium Bizionia argentinensis. In this work we demonstrate that BA42 has phosphoric-monoester hydrolase activity. The activity of BA42 is strictly dependent on the binding of divalent metals and retains nearly 70% of the maximum at 4° C, a typical characteristic of cold adapted enzymes...
October 18, 2016: FEBS Journal
Hye Yeon Koh, Hyun Park, Jun Hyuck Lee, Se Jong Han, Young Chang Sohn, Sung Gu Lee
Psychrobacter sp. PAMC 21119, isolated from Antarctic permafrost soil, grows and proliferates at subzero temperatures. However, its major mechanism of cold adaptation regulation remains poorly understood. We investigated the transcriptomic and proteomic responses of this species to cold temperatures by comparing profiles at -5°C and 20°C to understand how extreme microorganisms survive under subzero conditions. We found a total of 2,906 transcripts and 584 differentially expressed genes (≥ 2 fold, p <0...
October 17, 2016: Environmental Microbiology
Alina Gavrila, Per-Olof Hasselgren, Allison Glasgow, Ashley N Doyle, Alice Lee, Peter Fox, Gautam Shiva, James V Hennessey, Gerald M Kolodny, Aaron M Cypess
BACKGROUND: In addition to its role in adaptive thermogenesis, brown adipose tissue (BAT) may protect from weight gain, insulin resistance/diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Prior studies have shown contradictory results regarding the influence of thyroid hormone (TH) levels on BAT volume and activity. The aim of this pilot study was to gain further insight regarding the effect of TH treatment on BAT function in adult humans by evaluating the BAT mass and activity prospectively in six patients, first in the hypothyroid and then in the thyrotoxic phase...
October 17, 2016: Thyroid: Official Journal of the American Thyroid Association
Bjarki Stefansson, Gunnar B Sandholt, Ágústa Gudmundsdottir
Trypsins from Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), consisting of several isoenzymes, are highly active cold-adapted serine proteases. These trypsins are isolated for biomedical use in an eco-friendly manner from underutilized seafood by-products. Our group has explored the biochemical properties of trypsins and their high potential in biomedicine. For broader utilization of cod trypsins, further characterization of biochemical properties of the individual cod trypsin isoenzymes is of importance. For that purpose, a benzamidine purified trypsin isolate from Atlantic cod was analyzed...
October 12, 2016: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta
Stefania Brocca, Cristian Ferrari, Alberto Barbiroli, Alessandra Pesce, Marina Lotti, Marco Nardini
Life in cold environments requires an overall increase in the flexibility of macromolecular and supramolecular structures to allow biological processes to take place at low temperature. Conformational flexibility supports high catalytic rates of enzymes in the cold but in several cases is also a cause of instability. The three-dimensional structure of the psychrophilic acyl aminoacyl peptidase from Sporosarcina psychrophila (SpAAP) reported in this paper highlights adaptive molecular changes resulting in a fine-tuned trade-off between flexibility and stability...
October 14, 2016: FEBS Journal
Damianos Chatzievangelou, Carolina Doya, Laurenz Thomsen, Autun Purser, Jacopo Aguzzi
Three benthic megafaunal species (i.e. sablefish Anoplopoma fimbria; pacific hagfish Eptatretus stoutii and a group of juvenile crabs) were tested for diel behavioral patterns at the methane hydrates site of Barkley Canyon (890 m depth), off Vancouver Island (BC, Canada). Fluctuations of animal counts in linear video-transects conducted with the Internet Operated Deep-Sea Crawler "Wally" in June, July and December of 2013, were used as proxy of population activity rhythms. Count time series and environmental parameters were analyzed under the hypothesis that the environmental conditioning of activity rhythms depends on the life habits of particular species (i...
2016: PloS One
Jonathan B Armstrong, Eric J Ward, Daniel E Schindler, Peter J Lisi
As climate change increases maximal water temperatures, behavioural thermoregulation may be crucial for the persistence of coldwater fishes, such as salmonids. Although myriad studies have documented behavioural thermoregulation in southern populations of salmonids, few if any have explored this phenomenon in northern populations, which are less likely to have an evolutionary history of heat stress, yet are predicted to experience substantial warming. Here, we treated a rare heat wave as a natural experiment to test whether wild sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) at the northern extent of their primary range (60° latitude) can thermoregulate in response to abnormally high thermal conditions...
2016: Conservation Physiology
Tanaka Kenta, Jessica E M Edwards, Roger K Butlin, Terry Burke, W Paul Quick, Peter Urwin, Matthew P Davey
Whilst genotype-environment interaction is increasingly receiving attention by ecologists and evolutionary biologists, such studies need genetically homogeneous replicates-a challenging hurdle in outcrossing plants. This could potentially be overcome by using tissue culture techniques. However, plants regenerated from tissue culture may show aberrant phenotypes and "somaclonal" variation. Here we examined the somaclonal variation due to tissue culturing using the response to cold treatment of the photosynthetic efficiency (chlorophyll fluorescence measurements for Fv/Fm, Fv'/Fm' and ΦPSII, representing maximum efficiency of photosynthesis for dark- and light-adapted leaves, and the actual electron transport operating efficiency, respectively, which are reliable indicators of photoinhibition and damage to the photosynthetic electron transport system)...
October 11, 2016: G3: Genes—Genomes—Genetics
Josef Hájek, Miloš Barták, Jana Hazdrová, Marie Forbelská
Extremophilic lichens and their photosynthesizing photobionts from the cold regions of Earth are adapted to perform photosynthesis at subzero temperatures. To evaluate interspecific differences in the critical temperature for primary photochemical processes of photosynthesis, we exposed lichen thalli of Usnea antarctica, Usnea aurantiaco-atra, and Umbilicaria cylindrica to linear cooling from +20 to -50 °C at a constant rate of 2 °C min(-1). Simultaneously, two chlorophyll fluorescence parameters (FV/FM - potential yield of photosynthetic processes in photosystem II, ΦPSII - effective quantum yield of PS II) evaluating a gradual subzero temperature-induced decline in photosynthetic processes were measured by a modulated fluorometer...
October 8, 2016: Cryobiology
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