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Drosophila melanogaster immunity

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28636161/infinity-sperm-storage-the-gift-that-keeps-on-giving
#1
Gauthier Schang, Beatriz Fernandez-Fuertes, Samantha C Lean, Alexandra L Nguyen, Osvaldo Bogado Pascottini
Female Drosophila retain sperm for up to two weeks post-copulation in a network of storage organs includng the bursa, the seminal receptacle, and the spermathecae. This image shows the seminal receptacle of a Drosophila melanogaster female, 2-hrs post-copulation between a LHM (wild-type) female with a Protamine B (green), β-Tubulin (blue) fluorescently tagged male, whose sperm can be visualized within the female. This 'infinity' structure of the seminal receptacle resembles the tubular coil that allows for the storage of very long sperm relative to female body size -up to 20 times the length of the female in some Drosophila species...
June 21, 2017: Molecular Reproduction and Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28633893/genes-encoding-cuticular-proteins-are-components-of-the-nimrod-gene-cluster-in-drosophila
#2
Gyöngyi Cinege, János Zsámboki, Maite Vidal-Quadras, Anne Uv, Gábor Csordás, Viktor Honti, Erika Gábor, Zoltán Hegedűs, Gergely I B Varga, Attila L Kovács, Gábor Juhász, Michael J Williams, István Andó, Éva Kurucz
The Nimrod gene cluster, located on the second chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster, is the largest synthenic unit of the Drosophila genome. Nimrod genes show blood cell specific expression and code for phagocytosis receptors that play a major role in fruit fly innate immune functions. We previously identified three homologous genes (vajk-1, vajk-2 and vajk-3) located within the Nimrod cluster, which are unrelated to the Nimrod genes, but are homologous to a fourth gene (vajk-4) located outside the cluster...
June 17, 2017: Insect Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28621308/inhalation-toxicity-of-indoor-air-pollutants-in-drosophila-melanogaster-using-integrated-transcriptomics-and-computational-behavior-analyses
#3
Hyun-Jeong Eom, Yuedan Liu, Gyu-Suk Kwak, Muyoung Heo, Kyung Seuk Song, Yun Doo Chung, Tae-Soo Chon, Jinhee Choi
We conducted an inhalation toxicity test on the alternative animal model, Drosophila melanogaster, to investigate potential hazards of indoor air pollution. The inhalation toxicity of toluene and formaldehyde was investigated using comprehensive transcriptomics and computational behavior analyses. The ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) based on microarray data suggests the involvement of pathways related to immune response, stress response, and metabolism in formaldehyde and toluene exposure based on hub molecules...
June 16, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28586288/genomic-signatures-of-local-adaptation-in-the-drosophila-immune-response
#4
Angela M Early, Andrew G Clark
As environments and pathogen landscapes shift, host defenses must evolve to remain effective. Due to this selection pressure, among-species comparisons of genetic sequence data often find immune genes to be among the fastest evolving genes across the genome. The full extent and nature of these immune adaptations, however, remain largely unexplored. In a recent study, we analyzed patterns of selection within distinct components of the Drosophila melanogaster immune pathway. While we found evidence of positive selection within some immune processes, immune genes were not universally characterized by signatures of strong selection...
June 6, 2017: Fly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28578396/neonicotinoid-induced-pathogen-susceptibility-is-mitigated-by-lactobacillus-plantarum-immune-stimulation-in-a-drosophila-melanogaster-model
#5
Brendan A Daisley, Mark Trinder, Tim W McDowell, Hylke Welle, Josh S Dube, Sohrab N Ali, Hon S Leong, Mark W Sumarah, Gregor Reid
Pesticides are used extensively in food production to maximize crop yields. However, neonicotinoid insecticides exert unintentional toxicity to honey bees (Apis mellifera) that may partially be associated with massive population declines referred to as colony collapse disorder. We hypothesized that imidacloprid (common neonicotinoid; IMI) exposure would make Drosophila melanogaster (an insect model for the honey bee) more susceptible to bacterial pathogens, heat stress, and intestinal dysbiosis. Our results suggested that the immune deficiency (Imd) pathway is necessary for D...
June 2, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28541576/rapidly-evolving-toll-3-4-genes-encode-male-specific-toll-like-receptors-in-drosophila
#6
Tera C Levin, Harmit S Malik
Animal Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have evolved through a pattern of duplication and divergence. Whereas mammalian TLRs directly recognize microbial ligands, Drosophila Tolls bind endogenous ligands downstream of both developmental and immune signaling cascades. Here, we find that most Toll genes in Drosophila evolve slowly with little gene turnover (gains/losses), consistent with their important roles in development and indirect roles in microbial recognition. In contrast, we find that the Toll-3/4 genes have experienced an unusually rapid rate of gene gains and losses, resulting in lineage-specific Toll-3/4s and vastly different gene repertoires among Drosophila species, from zero copies (e...
May 25, 2017: Molecular Biology and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28541519/reduced-sleep-during-social-isolation-leads-to-cellular-stress-and-induction-of-the-unfolded-protein-response-upr
#7
Marishka K Brown, Ewa Strus, Nirinjini Naidoo
Study Objectives: Social isolation has a multitude of negative consequences on human health including the ability to endure challenges to the immune system, sleep amount and efficiency, and general morbidity and mortality. These adverse health outcomes are conserved in other social species. In the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, social isolation leads to increased aggression, impaired memory and reduced amounts of daytime sleep. There is a correlation between molecules affected by social isolation and those implicated in sleep in Drosophila...
May 25, 2017: Sleep
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28510293/a-test-for-y-linked-additive-and-epistatic-effects-on-surviving-bacterial-infections-in-drosophila-melanogaster
#8
Ian C Kutch, Kenneth M Fedorka
Y and W chromosomes offer a theoretically powerful way for sexual dimorphism to evolve. Consistent with this possibility, Drosophila melanogaster Y-chromosomes can influence gene regulation throughout the genome; particularly immune-related genes. In order for Y-linked regulatory variation (YRV) to contribute to adaptive evolution it must be comprised of additive genetic variance, such that variable Ys induce consistent phenotypic effects within the local gene pool. We assessed the potential for Y-chromosomes to adaptively shape gram-negative and gram-positive bacterial defense by introgressing Ys across multiple genetic haplotypes from the same population...
May 16, 2017: Journal of Evolutionary Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28506893/macpf-cdc-proteins-in-development-insights-from-drosophila-torso-like
#9
REVIEW
Travis K Johnson, Michelle A Henstridge, Coral G Warr
The Membrane Attack Complex Perforin-like/Cholesterol-Dependent Cytolysin (MACPF) superfamily is an ancient and biologically diverse group of proteins that are best known for pore-forming roles in mammalian immunity and bacterial pathogenesis. Intriguingly, however, some eukaryotic proteins which contain the MACPF domain that defines this family do not act in attack or defence, and instead have distinct developmental functions. It remains unclear whether these proteins function via pore formation or have a different mechanism of action...
May 12, 2017: Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28503170/drosophila-melanogaster-as-a-high-throughput-model-for-host-microbiota-interactions
#10
Mark Trinder, Brendan A Daisley, Josh S Dube, Gregor Reid
Microbiota research often assumes that differences in abundance and identity of microorganisms have unique influences on host physiology. To test this concept mechanistically, germ-free mice are colonized with microbial communities to assess causation. Due to the cost, infrastructure challenges, and time-consuming nature of germ-free mouse models, an alternative approach is needed to investigate host-microbial interactions. Drosophila melanogaster (fruit flies) can be used as a high throughput in vivo screening model of host-microbiome interactions as they are affordable, convenient, and replicable...
2017: Frontiers in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28498729/the-distinct-function-of-tep2-and-tep6-in-the-immune-defense-of-drosophila-melanogaster-against-the-pathogen-photorhabdus
#11
Upasana Shokal, Hannah Kopydlowski, Ioannis Eleftherianos
Previous and recent investigations on the innate immune response of Drosophila have identified certain mechanisms that promote pathogen elimination. However, the function of Thioester-containing proteins (TEPs) in the fly still remains elusive. Recently we have shown the contribution of TEP4 in the antibacterial immune defense of Drosophila against non-pathogenic E. coli, and the pathogens Photorhabdus luminescens and P. asymbiotica. Here we studied the function of Tep genes in both humoral and cellular immunity upon E...
May 12, 2017: Virulence
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28497117/rna-interference-restricts-rift-valley-fever-virus-in-multiple-insect-systems
#12
Isabelle Dietrich, Stephanie Jansen, Gamou Fall, Stephan Lorenzen, Martin Rudolf, Katrin Huber, Anna Heitmann, Sabine Schicht, El Hadji Ndiaye, Mick Watson, Ilaria Castelli, Benjamin Brennan, Richard M Elliott, Mawlouth Diallo, Amadou A Sall, Anna-Bella Failloux, Esther Schnettler, Alain Kohl, Stefanie C Becker
The emerging bunyavirus Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is transmitted to humans and livestock by a large number of mosquito species. RNA interference (RNAi) has been characterized as an important innate immune defense mechanism used by mosquitoes to limit replication of positive-sense RNA flaviviruses and togaviruses; however, little is known about its role against negative-strand RNA viruses such as RVFV. We show that virus-specific small RNAs are produced in infected mosquito cells, in Drosophila melanogaster cells, and, most importantly, also in RVFV vector mosquitoes...
May 2017: MSphere
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28476910/the-immune-phenotype-of-three-drosophila-leukemia-models
#13
Badrul Arefin, Martin Kunc, Robert Krautz, Ulrich Theopold
Many leukemia patients suffer from dysregulation of their immune system, making them more susceptible to infections and leading to general weakening (cachexia). Both adaptive and innate immunity are affected. The fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster has an innate immune system including cells of the myeloid lineage (hemocytes). To study Drosophila immunity and physiology during leukemia we established three models by driving expression of a dominant-active version of the Ras oncogene (Ras(V12) ) alone or combined with knockdowns of tumor suppressors in Drosophila hemocytes...
May 5, 2017: G3: Genes—Genomes—Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28451923/mifepristone-ru486-acts-in-drosophila-melanogaster-females-to-counteract-the-life-span-shortening-and-pro-inflammatory-effects-of-male-sex-peptide
#14
John Tower, Gary N Landis, Jie Shen, Rachelle Choi, Yang Fan, Dasul Lee, Jaemin Song
Males with null mutation of Sex Peptide (SP) gene were compared to wild-type males for the ability to cause physiological changes in females that could be reversed by mifepristone. Males from wild-type strains decreased median female life span by average -51%. Feeding mifepristone increased life span of these females by average +106%. In contrast, SP-null males did not decrease female life span, and mifepristone increased median life span of these females by average +14%, which was equivalent to the effect of mifepristone in virgin females (average +16%)...
June 2017: Biogerontology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28450373/rnaseq-analysis-of-the-drosophila-response-to-the-entomopathogenic-nematode-steinernema
#15
Shruti Yadav, Sean Daugherty, Amol Carl Shetty, Ioannis Eleftherianos
Drosophila melanogaster is an outstanding model to study the molecular and functional basis of host-pathogen interactions. Currently our knowledge of microbial infections in D. melanogaster is well understood, however the response of flies to nematode infections is still in its infancy. Here we have used the potent parasitic nematode Steinernema carpocapsae that lives in mutualism with its endosymbiotic bacteria X. nematophila to examine the transcriptomic basis of the interaction between D. melanogaster and entomopathogenic nematodes...
April 26, 2017: G3: Genes—Genomes—Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28449654/inter-and-intra-species-variation-in-genome-wide-gene-expression-of-drosophila-in-response-to-parasitoid-wasp-attack
#16
Laura Salazar-Jaramillo, Kirsten M Jalvingh, Ammerins de Haan, Ken Kraaijeveld, Henk Buermans, Bregje Wertheim
BACKGROUND: Parasitoid resistance in Drosophila varies considerably, among and within species. An immune response, lamellocyte-mediated encapsulation, evolved in a subclade of Drosophila and was subsequently lost in at least one species within this subclade. While the mechanisms of resistance are fairly well documented in D. melanogaster, much less is known for closely related species. Here, we studied the inter- and intra-species variation in gene expression after parasitoid attack in Drosophila...
April 27, 2017: BMC Genomics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28448516/natural-variation-of-pirna-expression-affects-immunity-to-transposable-elements
#17
Sergei Ryazansky, Elizaveta Radion, Anastasia Mironova, Natalia Akulenko, Yuri Abramov, Valeriya Morgunova, Maria Y Kordyukova, Ivan Olovnikov, Alla Kalmykova
In the Drosophila germline, transposable elements (TEs) are silenced by PIWI-interacting RNA (piRNA) that originate from distinct genomic regions termed piRNA clusters and are processed by PIWI-subfamily Argonaute proteins. Here, we explore the variation in the ability to restrain an alien TE in different Drosophila strains. The I-element is a retrotransposon involved in the phenomenon of I-R hybrid dysgenesis in Drosophila melanogaster. Genomes of R strains do not contain active I-elements, but harbour remnants of ancestral I-related elements...
April 2017: PLoS Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28438980/host-and-bacterial-factors-control-susceptibility-of-drosophila-melanogaster-to-coxiella-burnetii-infection
#18
Reginaldo G Bastos, Zachary P Howard, Aoi Hiroyasu, Alan G Goodman
Coxiella burnetii is the causative agent of Q fever, a zoonotic disease that threatens both human and animal health. Due to the paucity of experimental animal models, little is known about how host factors interface with bacterial components and affect pathogenesis. Here, we used Drosophila melanogaster, in conjunction with the biosafety level 2 (BSL2) Nine Mile phase II (NMII) clone 4 strain of C. burnetii, as a model to investigate host and bacterial components implicated in infection. We demonstrate that adult Drosophila flies are susceptible to C...
July 2017: Infection and Immunity
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28426766/activated-entomopathogenic-nematode-infective-juveniles-release-lethal-venom-proteins
#19
Dihong Lu, Marissa Macchietto, Dennis Chang, Mirayana M Barros, James Baldwin, Ali Mortazavi, Adler R Dillman
Entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) are unique parasites due to their symbiosis with entomopathogenic bacteria and their ability to kill insect hosts quickly after infection. It is widely believed that EPNs rely on their bacterial partners for killing hosts. Here we disproved this theory by demonstrating that the in vitro activated infective juveniles (IJs) of Steinernema carpocapsae (a well-studied EPN species) release venom proteins that are lethal to several insects including Drosophila melanogaster. We confirmed that the in vitro activation is a good approximation of the in vivo process by comparing the transcriptomes of individual in vitro and in vivo activated IJs...
April 2017: PLoS Pathogens
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28425174/costs-and-benefits-of-sublethal-drosophila-c-virus-infection
#20
V Gupta, C O Stewart, S S C Rund, K Monteith, P F Vale
Viruses are major evolutionary drivers of insect immune systems. Much of our knowledge of insect immune responses derives from experimental infections using the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Most experiments, however, employ lethal pathogen doses through septic injury, frequently overwhelming host physiology. While this approach has revealed several immune mechanisms, it is less informative about the fitness costs hosts may experience during infection in the wild. Using both systemic and oral infection routes, we find that even apparently benign, sublethal infections with the horizontally transmitted Drosophila C virus (DCV) can cause significant physiological and behavioural morbidity that is relevant for host fitness...
April 20, 2017: Journal of Evolutionary Biology
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