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Cerebral hypoxia

Na-Shun Mengke, Bei Hu, Qian-Peng Han, Yi-Yu Deng, Ming Fang, Di Xie, Ang Li, Hong-Ke Zeng
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common type of progressive neurodegenerative disorder, and is responsible for the most common form of dementia in the elderly. Inflammation occurs in the brains of patients with AD, and is critical for disease progression. In the present study, the effects of rapamycin (RAPA) on neuroinflammation lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced were investigated. SH‑SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells were treated with 20 µg/ml LPS and 0.1, 1 or 10 nmol/l RAPA, and were analyzed at various time points (6, 12 and 24 h)...
October 25, 2016: Molecular Medicine Reports
David James Davies, Michael Clancy, Daniel Lighter, George M Balanos, Samuel John Edwin Lucas, Hamid Dehghani, Zhangjie Su, Mario Forcione, Antonio Belli
The Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has not been adopted as a mainstream monitoring modality in acute neurosurgical care due to concerns about its reliability and consistency. However, improvements in NIRS parameter recovery techniques are now available that may improve the quantitative accuracy of NIRS for this clinical context. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the abilities of a continuous-wave (CW) NIRS device with a similarly clinically viable NIRS device utilising a frequency-domain (FD) parameter recovery technique in detecting changes in cerebral tissue saturation during stepwise increases of experimentally induced hypoxia...
October 24, 2016: Journal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing
Li Zhou, Ping Chen, Yating Peng, Ruoyun Ouyang
Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is characterized by chronic nocturnal intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentations. Neurocognitive dysfunction, a significant and extraordinary complication of OSAS, influences patients' career, family, and social life and reduces quality of life to some extent. Previous researches revealed that repetitive hypoxia and reoxygenation caused mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum dysfunction, overactivated NADPH oxidase, xanthine oxidase, and uncoupling nitric oxide synthase, induced an imbalance between prooxidants and antioxidants, and then got rise to a series of oxidative stress (OS) responses, such as protein oxidation, lipid peroxidation, and DNA oxidation along with inflammatory reaction...
2016: Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Christos Lazaridis
Shock is a systemic form of acute circulatory failure leading to cellular dysoxia and death. Such a state of aerobic metabolism failure also underlies neuronal cell death in severe traumatic brain injury. It is becoming increasingly recognized that ischemic hypoxia is not the sole mechanism and that multiple alternate cooperating mechanisms may be responsible for compromising neuronal oxidative metabolism. These different mechanisms can be usefully understood via analysis of the classic subdivisions of tissue hypoxia...
October 11, 2016: Journal of Critical Care
Ferit Dogan, Dilek Sen Dokumaci, Ali Yildirim, Erol Bozdogan, Fatima Nurefsan Boyaci, Bulent Koca, Ekrem Karakas
OBJECTIVES: This preliminary study aimed to evaluate whether there are changes in the Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) values of the brain in patients presenting with Eisenmenger syndrome (ES). METHODS: This cross-sectional study included 10 consecutively recruited patients with ES and 10 healthy control subjects. In the patients and controls, 8 distinct neuroanatomical locations were selected for the analysis. Quantitative measurements of ADC values of the frontal and occiptal white matter, lentiform nucleus, thalamus, frontal cortex, anterior and posterior limbs of the internal capsule, caudate nucleus were measured...
October 21, 2016: British Journal of Radiology
X F Guo, Y N Zhao, J M Li, C X Chen, S X Li
Objective: To compare the changes in the expression of mTOR and beclin1 in the hippocampus of normal rats and intermittent hypoxia rats with cerebral ischemia/reperfusion, so as to explore the roles of mTOR/autophagy pathway in global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injure aggravated by intermittent hypoxia. Methods: One hundred healthy male Wistar rats were randomly divided into: sham operation group(SO group, n=20), intermittent hypoxia group(IH group, n=20), merely ischemia/reperfusion group(I/R group, n=20), intermittent hypoxia ischemia/reperfusion group(IH+ I/R group, n=20), intermittent hypoxia ischemia/reperfusion+ mTOR inhibitor group(Inhibitor group, n=20)...
October 7, 2016: Zhonghua Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke za Zhi, Chinese Journal of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery
Hsing-Hua Tsai, Chin-Pu Lin, Yi-Hui Lin, Chih-Chin Hsu, Jong-Shyan Wang
PURPOSE: Exercise training improves endothelium-dependent vasodilation, whereas hypoxic stress causes vascular endothelial dysfunction. Monocyte-derived endothelial progenitor cells (Mon-EPCs) contribute to vascular repair process by differentiating into endothelial cells. This study investigates how high-intensity interval (HIT) and moderate-intensity continuous (MCT) exercise training affect circulating Mon-EPC levels and EPC functionality under hypoxic condition. METHODS: Sixty healthy sedentary males were randomized to engage in either HIT (3-min intervals at 40 and 80 % VO2max for five repetitions, n = 20) or MCT (sustained 60 % VO2max, n = 20) for 30 min/day, 5 days/week for 6 weeks, or to a control group (CTL) that did not received exercise intervention (n = 20)...
October 19, 2016: European Journal of Applied Physiology
Shixiao Zhang, Zan Guo, Shijie Yang, Huijuan Ma, Congrui Fu, Sheng Wang, Yi Zhang, Yixian Liu, Jie Hu
OBJECTIVE: Providing adequate protection against cerebral ischemia remains an unrealized goal. The present study was aimed at testing whether chronic intermittent hypobaric hypoxia (CIHH) would have protective effects against cerebral ischemia and investigating the potential role of mitochondrial membrane ATP-sensitive potassium channel (mitoKATP) in this effect. METHODS: Ischemia was induced in rats by occlusion of bilateral common carotid arteries for 8min on day 2 after bilateral vertebral arteries were permanently electrocauterized and CIHH was simulated in a hypoxic chamber...
October 16, 2016: Neuroscience Letters
Marc Jubeau, Thomas Rupp, John Temesi, Stéphane Perrey, Bernard Wuyam, Guillaume Y Millet, Samuel Verges
PURPOSE: Prolonged cycling exercise performance in normoxia is limited due to both peripheral and central neuromuscular impairments. It has been reported that cerebral perturbations are greater during short-duration exercise in hypoxia compared to normoxia. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that central deficits are accentuated in hypoxia compared to normoxia during prolonged (3 bouts of 80 min separated by 25 min) whole-body exercise at the same relative intensity...
October 6, 2016: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Ying Li Gu, Guan Qun Gao, Ning Ma, Lin Lin Ye, Li Wei Zhang, Xu Gao, Zhuo Bo Zhang
The aim of the present study was to investigate whether ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) plays its neuroprotective role following hypoxic injury through the activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling. Firstly, to determine whether CNTF exerts its effects via STAT3 following hypoxic injury, cultured neurons from the cerebral cortex of mice were prepared and a neuronal model of hypoxia was then established. The neurons exposed to hypoxia were then pre-treated with CNTF and transfected with small interference RNA (siRNA) targeting STAT3 (STAT3 siRNA) using polybrene, or with STAT3Tyr705 mutant or STAT3Ser727 mutant using an electroporation system...
October 13, 2016: International Journal of Molecular Medicine
Marie-Laure Specq, Mélisande Bourgoin-Heck, Nathalie Samson, François Corbin, Christian Gestreau, Maxime Richer, Hazim Kadhim, Jean-Paul Praud
Hyperbilirubinemia (HB) occurs in 90% of preterm newborns. Moderate HB can induce acute neurological disorders while severe HB has been linked to a higher incidence of apneas of prematurity. The present study aimed to test the hypothesis that even moderate HB disrupts cardiorespiratory control in preterm lambs. Two groups of preterm lambs (born 14 days prior to term), namely control (n = 6) and HB (n = 5), were studied. At day 5 of life, moderate HB (150-250 μmol/L) was induced during 17 h in the HB group after which cardiorespiratory control as well as laryngeal and pulmonary chemoreflexes were assessed during baseline recordings and during hypoxia...
2016: Frontiers in Physiology
Benedikt Wiestler, Anne Kluge, Mathias Lukas, Jens Gempt, Florian Ringel, Jürgen Schlegel, Bernhard Meyer, Claus Zimmer, Stefan Förster, Thomas Pyka, Christine Preibisch
Non-invasive, imaging-based examination of glioma biology has received increasing attention in the past couple of years. To this end, the development and refinement of novel MRI techniques, reflecting underlying oncogenic processes such as hypoxia or angiogenesis, has greatly benefitted this research area. We have recently established a novel BOLD (blood oxygenation level dependent) based MRI method for the measurement of relative oxygen extraction fraction (rOEF) in glioma patients. In a set of 37 patients with newly diagnosed glioma, we assessed the performance of a machine learning model based on multiple MRI modalities including rOEF and perfusion imaging to predict WHO grade...
October 14, 2016: Scientific Reports
Shyanne Page, Alli Munsell, Abraham J Al-Ahmad
BACKGROUND: Cerebral hypoxia/ischemia (H/I) is an important stress factor involved in the disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) following stroke injury, yet the cellular and molecular mechanisms on how the human BBB responds to such injury remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the cellular response of the human BBB to chemical and environmental H/I in vitro. METHODS: In this study, we used immortalized hCMEC/D3 and IMR90 stem-cell derived human brain microvascular endothelial cell lines (IMR90-derived BMECs)...
October 11, 2016: Fluids and Barriers of the CNS
Daniel Gruneberg, Felipe A Montellano, Konstanze Plaschke, Lexiao Li, Hugo H Marti, Reiner Kunze
Episodes of cerebral hypoxia/ischemia increase the risk of dementia, which is associated with impaired learning and memory. Previous studies in rodent models of dementia indicated a favorable effect of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) targets VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) and erythropoietin (Epo). In the present study we thus investigated whether activation of the entire adaptive HIF pathway in neurons by cell-specific deletion of the HIF suppressor prolyl-4-hydroxylase 2 (PHD2) improves cognitive abilities in young (3months) and old (18-28months) mice suffering from chronic brain hypoperfusion...
October 5, 2016: Experimental Neurology
Bilge Öztoprak
OBJECTIVES: Clinical applications of susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) are increasing steadily. The aim of this study is to investigate the appearance of cerebral veins on SWI, which is very sensitive to the deoxyhaemoglobin level in vessels, in pulmonary embolism (PE). METHODS: The cranial SWI images of 19 patients with PE and 22 controls from September 2013 through March 2016 were retrospectively examined for the presence of prominent cerebral veins. MRI findings were correlated with blood oxygen levels...
October 4, 2016: European Radiology
Ursula I Tuor, Manasi Sule, Min Qiao
PURPOSE: To determine whether damage to neonatal brain is exacerbated with multiple mild cerebral insults as detected with MRI and corroborated using histology. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The combined brain injury produced by multiple procedures was compared in neonatal rats having: Sham surgery at P5, Sham surgery at P5 plus a diffuse mild transient unilateral cerebral hypoxia ischemia (HI) at P7, HI alone, and a minor photothrombotic (PT) stroke at P5 followed by HI...
October 1, 2016: Neuroscience Letters
Jiří Bonaventura, David Alan, Jiri Vejvoda, Jakub Honek, Josef Veselka
In spite of many years of development and implementation of pre-hospital advanced life support programmes, the survival rate of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) used to be very poor. Neurologic injury from cerebral hypoxia is the most common cause of death in patients with OHCA. In the past two decades, post-resuscitation care has developed many new concepts aimed at improving the neurological outcome and survival rate of patients after cardiac arrest. Systematic post-cardiac arrest care after the return of spontaneous circulation, including induced mild therapeutic hypothermia (TH) in selected patients, is aimed at significantly improving rates of long-term neurologically intact survival...
October 1, 2016: Archives of Medical Science: AMS
Øyvind Sverre Svendsen, Ketil Grong, Knut Sverre Andersen, Paul Husby
BACKGROUND: Accidental hypothermia with arrested circulation remains a condition associated with high mortality. In our institution, extracorporeal circulation (ECC) rewarming has been the cornerstone in treating such patients since 1987. We here explore characteristics and outcomes of this treatment, to identify significant merits and challenges from 3 decades of experience in ECC rewarming. METHODS: Sixty-nine patients rewarmed by ECC during the period from December 1987 to December 2015 were analyzed...
September 27, 2016: Annals of Thoracic Surgery
Y Onetti, A P Dantas, B Pérez, A J McNeish, E Vila, F Jiménez-Altayó
AIM: Increased thromboxane A2 and peroxynitrite are hallmarks of cerebral ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R). Stimulation of thromboxane/prostaglandin receptors (TP) attenuates endothelium-derived hyperpolarization (EDH). We investigated whether EDH-type middle cerebral artery (MCA) relaxations following TP stimulation are altered after I/R and the influence of peroxynitrite. METHODS: Vascular function was determined by wire myography after TP stimulation with the thromboxane A2 mimetic 9,11-dideoxy-9α, 11α -methano-epoxy prostaglandin F2α (U46619) in MCA of Sprague Dawley rats subjected to MCA occlusion (90 min)/reperfusion (24 h) or sham operation, and in non-operated (control) rats...
September 28, 2016: Acta Physiologica
Jose V Lafuente, G Bermudez, L Camargo-Arce, S Bulnes
Cerebral syndromes related to high altitude exposure are becoming more frequent as the number of trips to high altitudes has increased in the last decade. The commonest symptom is headache, followed by acute mountain sickness (AMS) and high-altitude cerebral edema (HACE), which can be fatal. The pathophysiology of these syndromes is not fully comprehended. The classical "tight-fit hypothesis" defends the fact that there are some anatomical variations that would obstruct the sinovenous outflow and worsen the vasogenic edema and intracranial hypertension reactive to hypoxia...
September 20, 2016: CNS & Neurological Disorders Drug Targets
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