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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28214378/calcium-signaling-through-l-type-calcium-channels-role-in-pathophysiology-of-spinal-nociceptive-transmission
#1
REVIEW
Olivier Roca-Lapirot, Houda Radwani, Franck Aby, Frédéric Nagy, Marc Landry Pascal Fossat
L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are ubiquitous channels in the central nervous system. L-type calcium channels (LTCs) are mostly post-synaptic channels regulating neuronal firing and gene expression. They play a role in important physio-pathological processes such as learning and memory, Parkinson's disease, autism and, as recognized more recently, in the pathophysiology of pain processes. Classically, the fundamental role of these channels in cardiovascular functions has limited the use of classical molecules to treat LTC-dependent disorders...
February 18, 2017: British Journal of Pharmacology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28212520/adp-ribosyl-cyclases-cd38-cd157-social-skills-and-friendship
#2
Anne Chong, Fabio Malavasi, Salomon Israel, Chiea Chuen Khor, Von Bing Yap, Mikhail Monakhov, Soo Hong Chew, Poh San Lai, Richard P Ebstein
Why some individuals seek social engagement while others shy away has profound implications for normal and pathological human behavior. Evidence suggests that oxytocin (OT), the paramount human social hormone, and CD38 that governs OT release, contribute to individual differences in social skills from intense social involvement to extreme avoidance that characterize autism. To explore the neurochemical underpinnings of sociality, CD38 expression of peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) was measured in Han Chinese undergraduates...
January 16, 2017: Psychoneuroendocrinology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28211989/timothy-syndrome-1-genotype-without-syndactyly-and-major-extracardiac-manifestations
#3
Róbert Sepp, Lidia Hategan, Attila Bácsi, Judit Cseklye, László Környei, János Borbás, Márta Széll, Tamás Forster, István Nagy, Zoltán Hegedűs
Timothy syndrome 1 (TS1) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by multisystem abnormalities including QT prolongation, congenital heart defects, facial dysmorphism, episodic hypoglycemia, and neurological symptoms. A morphological hallmark of TS1 is syndactyly, present in all cases. TS1 is caused by the canonical p.Gly406Arg mutation in the alternatively spliced exon 8A in the CACNA1C gene, encoding for the main cardiac L-type calcium channel. A variant case of TS1 is reported. The proband had intermittent fetal bradycardia with heart rate of 72 bpm...
March 2017: American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28211606/nrf2-a-novel-therapeutic-target-in-fragile-x-syndrome-is-modulated-by-nnz2566
#4
Robert M J Deacon, Michael J Hurley, Camila Martínez Rebolledo, Mike Snape, Francisco J Altimiras, Leandro Farías, Michael Pino, Rodolfo Biekofsky, Larry Glass, Patricia Cogram
Fragile X-associated disorders are a family of genetic conditions resulting from the partial or complete loss of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). Among these disorders is fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability and autism. Progress in basic neuroscience has led to identification of molecular targets for treatment in FXS; however, there is a gap in translation to targeted therapies in humans. The present study introduces a novel therapeutic target for FXS: nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), a transcription factor known to induce expression of over 100 cytoprotective genes...
February 17, 2017: Genes, Brain, and Behavior
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28208013/sex-differences-in-autism-like-behavioral-phenotypes-and-postsynaptic-receptors-expression-in-the-prefrontal-cortex-of-tert-transgenic-mice
#5
Ki Chan Kim, Kyu Suk Cho, Sung Min Yang, Edson Luck Gonzales, Schley Valencia, Pyeong Hwa Eun, Chang Soon Choi, Darine Froy Mabunga, Ji-Woon Kim, Judy Kyoungju Noh, Hee Jin Kim, Se Jin Jeon, Seol-Heui Han, Geon Ho Bahn, Chan Young Shin
Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) remains unexplained and untreated despite the high attention of research in recent years. Aside from its various characteristics is the baffling male preponderance over the female population. Using a validated animal model of ASD which is the telomerase reverse transcriptase overexpressing mice (TERT-tg), we conducted ASD-related behavioral assessments and protein expression experiments to mark the difference between male and females of this animal model. After statistically analyzing the results, we found significant effects of TERT overexpression in sociability, social novelty preference, anxiety, nest building, and electroseizure threshold in the males but not their female littermates...
February 17, 2017: Biomolecules & Therapeutics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28196412/mapk3-at-the-autism-linked-human-16p11-2-locus-influences-precise-synaptic-target-selection-at-drosophila-larval-neuromuscular-junctions
#6
Sang Mee Park, Hae Ryoun Park, Ji Hye Lee
Proper synaptic function in neural circuits requires precise pairings between correct pre- and post-synaptic partners. Errors in this process may underlie development of neuropsychiatric disorders, such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Development of ASD can be influenced by genetic factors, including copy number variations (CNVs). In this study, we focused on a CNV occurring at the 16p11.2 locus in the human genome and investigated potential defects in synaptic connectivity caused by reduced activities of genes located in this region at Drosophila larval neuromuscular junctions, a well-established model synapse with stereotypic synaptic structures...
February 15, 2017: Molecules and Cells
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28194760/developmental-psychopathology-in-the-post-genomics-era-substantial-challenges-but-reasons-for-hope
#7
EDITORIAL
Jeffrey M Halperin
One only has to quickly look through the Table of Contents for this issue of JCPP to gain an appreciation of the ever-increasing influence of genetic research in the field of developmental psychopathology. Among the 13 articles in this issue that follow this editorial: two employ large family and/or twin studies to provide compelling behavioral genetic findings bolstering the importance of genes in the emergence of ADHD (Chen, Brikell, Lichtenstein, Serlachius, Kuja-Halkola, Sandin, and Larsson) and level of educational achievement in adolescents (Lewis, Asbury, and Plomin); one paper focuses on cortical development in patients with 22q11...
March 2017: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, and Allied Disciplines
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28192273/gabaa-receptor-subtypes-in-the-mouse-brain-regional-mapping-and-diazepam-receptor-occupancy-by-in-vivo-18-f-flumazenil-pet
#8
Adrienne Müller Herde, Dietmar Benke, William T Ralvenius, Linjing Mu, Roger Schibli, Hanns Ulrich Zeilhofer, Stefanie D Krämer
Classical benzodiazepines, which are widely used as sedatives, anxiolytics and anticonvulsants, exert their therapeutic effects through interactions with heteropentameric GABAA receptors composed of two α, two β and one γ2 subunit. Their high affinity binding site is located at the interface between the γ2 and the adjacent α subunit. The α-subunit gene family consists of six members and receptors can be homomeric or mixed with respect to the α-subunits. Previous work has suggested that benzodiazepine binding site ligands with selectivity for individual GABAA receptor subtypes, as defined by the benzodiazepine-binding α subunit, may have fewer side effects and may even be effective in diseases, such as schizophrenia, autism or chronic pain, that do not respond well to classical benzodiazepines...
February 10, 2017: NeuroImage
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28192196/quantification-of-various-app-mrna-isoforms-and-epistasis-in-lesch-nyhan-disease
#9
Khue Vu Nguyen, William L Nyhan
The present work is the development of a simple and specific kinetic method based on RT-PCR technique coupled with direct sequencing for quantification of various amyloid precursor protein-mRNA isoforms (APP-mRNA isoforms) in biological samples, especially for identifying the most abundant one that may decisive for the normal status or disease risk. Application of this kinetic method to the Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) was performed and results indicated an epistasis between mutated hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase1 (HPRT1) and APP genes...
February 10, 2017: Neuroscience Letters
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28191890/refining-the-role-of-de-novo-protein-truncating-variants-in-neurodevelopmental-disorders-by-using-population-reference-samples
#10
Jack A Kosmicki, Kaitlin E Samocha, Daniel P Howrigan, Stephan J Sanders, Kamil Slowikowski, Monkol Lek, Konrad J Karczewski, David J Cutler, Bernie Devlin, Kathryn Roeder, Joseph D Buxbaum, Benjamin M Neale, Daniel G MacArthur, Dennis P Wall, Elise B Robinson, Mark J Daly
Recent research has uncovered an important role for de novo variation in neurodevelopmental disorders. Using aggregated data from 9,246 families with autism spectrum disorder, intellectual disability, or developmental delay, we found that ∼1/3 of de novo variants are independently present as standing variation in the Exome Aggregation Consortium's cohort of 60,706 adults, and these de novo variants do not contribute to neurodevelopmental risk. We further used a loss-of-function (LoF)-intolerance metric, pLI, to identify a subset of LoF-intolerant genes containing the observed signal of associated de novo protein-truncating variants (PTVs) in neurodevelopmental disorders...
February 13, 2017: Nature Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28191889/targeted-sequencing-identifies-91-neurodevelopmental-disorder-risk-genes-with-autism-and-developmental-disability-biases
#11
Holly A F Stessman, Bo Xiong, Bradley P Coe, Tianyun Wang, Kendra Hoekzema, Michaela Fenckova, Malin Kvarnung, Jennifer Gerdts, Sandy Trinh, Nele Cosemans, Laura Vives, Janice Lin, Tychele N Turner, Gijs Santen, Claudia Ruivenkamp, Marjolein Kriek, Arie van Haeringen, Emmelien Aten, Kathryn Friend, Jan Liebelt, Christopher Barnett, Eric Haan, Marie Shaw, Jozef Gecz, Britt-Marie Anderlid, Ann Nordgren, Anna Lindstrand, Charles Schwartz, R Frank Kooy, Geert Vandeweyer, Celine Helsmoortel, Corrado Romano, Antonino Alberti, Mirella Vinci, Emanuela Avola, Stefania Giusto, Eric Courchesne, Tiziano Pramparo, Karen Pierce, Srinivasa Nalabolu, David G Amaral, Ingrid E Scheffer, Martin B Delatycki, Paul J Lockhart, Fereydoun Hormozdiari, Benjamin Harich, Anna Castells-Nobau, Kun Xia, Hilde Peeters, Magnus Nordenskjöld, Annette Schenck, Raphael A Bernier, Evan E Eichler
Gene-disruptive mutations contribute to the biology of neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs), but most of the related pathogenic genes are not known. We sequenced 208 candidate genes from >11,730 cases and >2,867 controls. We identified 91 genes, including 38 new NDD genes, with an excess of de novo mutations or private disruptive mutations in 5.7% of cases. Drosophila functional assays revealed a subset with increased involvement in NDDs. We identified 25 genes showing a bias for autism versus intellectual disability and highlighted a network associated with high-functioning autism (full-scale IQ >100)...
February 13, 2017: Nature Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28190998/quantitative-nucleotide-level-analysis-of-regulation-of-translation-in-response-to-depolarization-of-cultured-neural-cells
#12
Jasbir S Dalal, Chengran Yang, Darshan Sapkota, Allison M Lake, David R O'Brien, Joseph D Dougherty
Studies on regulation of gene expression have contributed substantially to understanding mechanisms for the long-term activity-dependent alterations in neural connectivity that are thought to mediate learning and memory. Most of these studies, however, have focused on the regulation of mRNA transcription. Here, we utilized high-throughput sequencing coupled with ribosome footprinting to globally characterize the regulation of translation in primary mixed neuronal-glial cultures in response to sustained depolarization...
2017: Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28190537/further-evidence-that-d-glycerate-kinase-gk-deficiency-is-a-benign-disorder
#13
Attia Kalim, Patricia Fitzsimons, Claudia Till, Malkanthi Fernando, Philip Mayne, Jorn Oliver Sass, Ellen Crushell
d-Glyceric aciduria is caused by deficiency in d-glycerate kinase (GK) due to recessive mutations in the GLYCTK gene. GK catalyzes the conversion of d-glycerate to 2-phosphoglycerate which is an intermediary reaction in the catabolism of serine and fructose. Deficiency of GK leads to accumulation of d-glycerate, which may be detected in urine organic acid analysis. Debate exists as to whether this is a benign or disease-causing disorder as the reported phenotypes vary significantly. We report two siblings from a consanguineous Pakistani family...
February 9, 2017: Brain & Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28187187/widespread-signatures-of-positive-selection-in-common-risk-alleles-associated-to-autism-spectrum-disorder
#14
Renato Polimanti, Joel Gelernter
The human brain is the outcome of innumerable evolutionary processes; the systems genetics of psychiatric disorders could bear their signatures. On this basis, we analyzed five psychiatric disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorder (ASD), bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, and schizophrenia (SCZ), using GWAS summary statistics from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium. Machine learning-derived scores were used to investigate two natural-selection scenarios: complete selection (loci where a selected allele reached fixation) and incomplete selection (loci where a selected allele has not yet reached fixation)...
February 10, 2017: PLoS Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28184409/homozygous-loss-of-autism-risk-gene-cntnap2-results-in-reduced-local-and-long-range-prefrontal-functional-connectivity
#15
Adam Liska, Alice Bertero, Ryszard Gomolka, Mara Sabbioni, Alberto Galbusera, Noemi Barsotti, Stefano Panzeri, Maria Luisa Scattoni, Massimo Pasqualetti, Alessandro Gozzi
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 10, 2017: Cerebral Cortex
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28184278/possible-sexually-dimorphic-role-of-mirna-and-other-sncrna-in-asd-brain
#16
Cynthia M Schumann, Frank R Sharp, Bradley P Ander, Boryana Stamova
BACKGROUND: Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is sexually dimorphic in brain structure, genetics, and behaviors. In studies of brain tissue, the age of the population is clearly a factor in interpreting study outcome, yet sex is rarely considered. To begin to address this issue, we extend our previously published microarray analyses to examine expression of small noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs), including microRNAs (miRNAs), in ASD and in the control temporal cortex in males and females. Predicted miRNA targets were identified as well as the pathways they overpopulate...
2017: Molecular Autism
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28183735/new-insights-into-the-regulatory-function-of-cyfip1-in-the-context-of-wave-and-fmrp-containing-complexes
#17
Sabiha Abekhoukh, H Bahar Sahin, Mauro Grossi, Samantha Zongaro, Thomas Maurin, Irene Madrigal, Daniele Kazue-Sugioka, Annick Raas-Rothschild, Mohamed Doulazmi, Pilar Carrera, Andrea Stachon, Steven Scherer, Maria Rita Drula Do Nascimento, Alain Trembleau, Ignacio Arroyo, Szatmari Peter, Isabel M Smith, Montserrat Milà, Adam C Smith, Angela Giangrande, Isabelle Caillé, Barbara Bardoni
CYtoplasmic FMRP Interacting Protein 1 (CYFIP1) is a candidate gene for intellectual disability (ID), autism, schizophrenia and epilepsy. It is a member of a family of proteins that is very conserved during evolution, sharing high homology with dCYFIP, its Drosophila homolog. CYFIP1 interacts with the Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP), whose absence causes the Fragile X Syndrome, and with the translation initiation factor eIF4E. It is a member of the WAVE Regulatory Complex (WRC), thus representing a link between translational regulation and actin cytoskeleton...
February 9, 2017: Disease Models & Mechanisms
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28182903/balancing-act-maintaining-amino-acid-levels-in-the-autistic-brain
#18
Thomas M Maynard, M Chiara Manzini
The ever-expanding number of genes that are mutated in autism is showing us how imbalances in fundamental cellular processes can lead to disease. A recent study by Tărlungeanu et al. (2016) identifies a form of ASD resulting from a failure of the brain to properly import amino acids.
February 8, 2017: Neuron
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28180026/chromosomal-microarrays-understanding-genetics-of-neurodevelopmental-disorders-and-congenital-anomalies
#19
REVIEW
Jill A Rosenfeld, Ankita Patel
Chromosomal microarray (CMA) testing, used to identify DNA copy number variations (CNVs), has helped advance knowledge about genetics of human neurodevelopmental disease and congenital anomalies. It has aided in discovering new CNV syndromes and uncovering disease genes. It has discovered CNVs that are not fully penetrant and/or cause a spectrum of phenotypes, including intellectual disability, autism, schizophrenia, and dysmorphisms. Such CNVs can pose challenges to genetic counseling. They also have helped increase knowledge of genetic risk factors for neurodevelopmental disease and raised awareness of possible shared etiologies among these variable phenotypes...
March 2017: Journal of Pediatric Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28179817/the-placenta-and-neurodevelopment-sex-differences-in-prenatal-vulnerability
#20
Tracy L Bale
Prenatal insults, such as maternal stress, are associated with an increased neurodevelopmental disease risk and impact males significantly more than females, including increased rates of autism, mental retardation, stuttering, dyslexia, and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Sex differences in the placenta, which begin with sex chromosomes, are likely to produce sex-specific transplacental signals to the developing brain. Our studies and others have identified X-linked genes that are expressed at higher levels in the female placenta...
December 2016: Dialogues in Clinical Neuroscience
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