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Climate change plant distribution

Joanne M Bennett, Piero Calosi, Susana Clusella-Trullas, Brezo Martínez, Jennifer Sunday, Adam C Algar, Miguel B Araújo, Bradford A Hawkins, Sally Keith, Ingolf Kühn, Carsten Rahbek, Laura Rodríguez, Alexander Singer, Fabricio Villalobos, Miguel Ángel Olalla-Tárraga, Ignacio Morales-Castilla
How climate affects species distributions is a longstanding question receiving renewed interest owing to the need to predict the impacts of global warming on biodiversity. Is climate change forcing species to live near their critical thermal limits? Are these limits likely to change through natural selection? These and other important questions can be addressed with models relating geographical distributions of species with climate data, but inferences made with these models are highly contingent on non-climatic factors such as biotic interactions...
March 13, 2018: Scientific Data
Josef Greimler, Christian H Schulze, Patricio López Sepúlveda, Patricio Novoa, Alejandro Gatica, Karl Reiter, Johannes Wessely, Carlos Baeza, Patricio Peñailillo, Eduardo Ruiz, Tod Stuessy
Oceanic islands are vulnerable ecosystems and their flora has been under pressure since the arrival of the first humans. Human activities and both deliberately and inadvertently introduced biota have had and continue to have a severe impact on island endemic plants. The number of alien plants has increased nearly linearly on many islands, perhaps resulting in extinction-based saturation of island floras. Here, we provide evidence for such a scenario in Alejandro Selkirk, Robinson Crusoe Islands (Archipelago Juan Fernández, Chile)...
March 2018: Ecology and Evolution
Yvette L Eley, Michael T Hren
Estimates of atmospheric moisture are critical for understanding the links and feedbacks between atmospheric CO2 and global climate. At present, there are few quantitative moisture proxies that are applicable to deep time. We present a new proxy for atmospheric moisture derived from modern climate and leaf biomarker data from North and Central America. Plants have a direct genetic pathway to regulate the production of lipids in response to osmotic stress, which is manifested in a change in the distribution of simple aliphatic lipids such as n-alkanes...
March 2, 2018: Scientific Reports
Connie O'Driscoll, José L J Ledesma, John Coll, John G Murnane, Paul Nolan, Eva M Mockler, Martyn N Futter, Liwen W Xiao
Natural organic matter poses an increasing challenge to water managers because of its potential adverse impacts on water treatment and distribution, and subsequently human health. Projections were made of impacts of climate change on dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the primarily agricultural Boyne catchment which is used as a potable water supply in Ireland. The results indicated that excluding a potential rise in extreme precipitation, future projected loads are not dissimilar to those observed under current conditions...
February 27, 2018: Science of the Total Environment
Majid Fereidoon, Manfred Koch
Agriculture is one of the environmental/economic sectors that may adversely be affected by climate change, especially, in already nowadays water-scarce regions, like the Middle East. One way to cope with future changes in absolute as well as seasonal (irrigation) water amounts can be the adaptation of the agricultural crop pattern in a region, i.e. by planting crops which still provide high yields and so economic benefits to farmers under such varying climate conditions. To do this properly, the whole cascade starting from climate change, effects on hydrology and surface water availability, subsequent effects on crop yield, agricultural areas available, and, finally, economic value of a multi-crop cultivation pattern must be known...
February 24, 2018: Science of the Total Environment
Samuel B St Clair, Joshua Hoines
Climate change is restructuring plant populations and can result in range shifts depending on responses at various life stages of plants. In 2013, a widespread and episodic flowering event provided an opportunity to characterize how Joshua tree's reproductive success and population structure vary in response to the climate variability across its range. We examined the reproductive success and stand structure of 10 Joshua tree populations distributed across the Mojave Desert. Joshua tree density varied by more than an order of magnitude across sites...
2018: PloS One
Lisa G Neven, Sunil Kumar, Wee L Yee, Tewodros Wakie
The oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta (Busck) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), is a primary pest of stone fruits that cause significant economic damage. Larvae, which enter the host plant through shoot tips, damage shoots, and ripe fruits. Native to Asia, this pest now occurs in many fruit-growing countries, including the United States and Canada. Though the pest was previously reported from many states within the United States, its current distribution and the environmental variables that influence its distribution are not properly identified...
February 17, 2018: Environmental Entomology
L F Muniz, A B Bombo, A L Filartiga, B Appezzato-da-Glória
Vegetative aerial organs are considerably more exposed to environmental conditions and can reflect the specific adaptations of plants to their local environment. Aldama grandiflora species are known to be widely distributed in Brazil; therefore, individuals from different populations of this species are thought to be exposed to different abiotic and biotic conditions. Several anatomical studies conducted on Brazilian Aldama species have mainly focused on the qualitative anatomical characters or traits of these species, but not on their quantitative traits...
February 15, 2018: Brazilian Journal of Biology, Revista Brasleira de Biologia
Polina Yu Novikova, Nora Hohmann, Yves Van de Peer
Polyploidy may provide adaptive advantages and is considered to be important for evolution and speciation. Polyploidy events are found throughout the evolutionary history of plants, however they do not seem to be uniformly distributed along the time axis. For example, many of the detected ancient whole-genome duplications (WGDs) seem to cluster around the K/Pg boundary (∼66Mya), which corresponds to a drastic climate change event and a mass extinction. Here, we discuss more recent polyploidy events using Arabidopsis as the most developed plant model at the level of the entire genus...
February 12, 2018: Current Opinion in Plant Biology
Paul E Abraham, Benjamin J Garcia, Lee E Gunter, Sara S Jawdy, Nancy Engle, Xiaohan Yang, Daniel A Jacobson, Robert L Hettich, Gerald A Tuskan, Timothy J Tschaplinski
Drought stress is a recurring feature of world climate and the single most important factor influencing agricultural yield worldwide. Plants display highly variable, species-specific responses to drought and these responses are multifaceted, requiring physiological and morphological changes influenced by genetic and molecular mechanisms. Moreover, the reproducibility of water deficit studies is very cumbersome, which significantly impedes research on drought tolerance, because how a plant responds is highly influenced by the timing, duration, and intensity of the water deficit...
2018: PloS One
Nima Madani, John S Kimball, Ashley P Ballantyne, David L R Affleck, Peter M van Bodegom, Peter B Reich, Jens Kattge, Anna Sala, Mona Nazeri, Matthew O Jones, Maosheng Zhao, Steven W Running
Plant traits are both responsive to local climate and strong predictors of primary productivity. We hypothesized that future climate change might promote a shift in global plant traits resulting in changes in Gross Primary Productivity (GPP). We characterized the relationship between key plant traits, namely Specific Leaf Area (SLA), height, and seed mass, and local climate and primary productivity. We found that by 2070, tropical and arid ecosystems will be more suitable for plants with relatively lower canopy height, SLA and seed mass, while far northern latitudes will favor woody and taller plants than at present...
February 12, 2018: Scientific Reports
Shuang Tian, Yixuan Kou, Zhirong Zhang, Lin Yuan, Derong Li, Jordi López-Pujol, Dengmei Fan, Zhiyong Zhang
BACKGROUND: Mountains have not only provided refuge for species, but also offered dispersal corridors during the Neogene and Quaternary global climate changes. Compared with a plethora of studies on the refuge role of China's mountain ranges, their dispersal corridor role has received little attention in plant phylogeographic studies. Using phylogeographic data of Eomecon chionantha Hance (Papaveraceae), this study explicitly tested whether the Nanling Mountains, which spans from west to east for more than 1000 km in subtropical China, could have functioned as a dispersal corridor during the late Quaternary in addition to a glacial refugium...
February 9, 2018: BMC Evolutionary Biology
A N M Rubaiyath Bin Rahman, Jianhua Zhang
Crop productivity and stability of the food system are threatened by climate change, mainly through the effects of predicted abiotic stresses. Despite extensive research on abiotic stress tolerance in the past decades, the successful translation of these research to fields/farmers is scarce. The impelling demand of climate resilient varieties, and the poor translation of research into the field despite the availability of high throughput technologies lead us to critically analyse a neglected aspect of current abiotic stress tolerance research...
February 8, 2018: Rice
Aleksandra Kosanic, Karen Anderson, Stephan Harrison, Thea Turkington, Jonathan Bennie
Recent climate change has had a major impact on biodiversity and has altered the geographical distribution of vascular plant species. This trend is visible globally; however, more local and regional scale research is needed to improve understanding of the patterns of change and to develop appropriate conservation strategies that can minimise cultural, health, and economic losses at finer scales. Here we describe a method to manually geo-reference botanical records from a historical herbarium to track changes in the geographical distributions of plant species in West Cornwall (South West England) using both historical (pre-1900) and contemporary (post-1900) distribution records...
2018: PloS One
Jessica C Huss, Vanessa Schoeppler, David J Merritt, Christine Best, Eric Maire, Jérôme Adrien, Oliver Spaeker, Nils Janssen, Johannes Gladisch, Notburga Gierlinger, Ben P Miller, Peter Fratzl, Michaela Eder
Heat-triggered fruit opening and delayed release of mature seeds are widespread among plants in fire-prone ecosystems. Here, the material characteristics of the seed-containing follicles of Banksia attenuata (Proteaceae), which open in response to heat frequently caused by fire, are investigated. Material analysis reveals that long-term dimensional stability and opening temperatures of follicles collected across an environmental gradient increase as habitats become drier, hotter, and more fire prone. A gradual increase in the biaxial curvature of the hygroscopic valves provides the follicles in the driest region with the highest flexural rigidity...
January 2018: Advanced Science (Weinheim, Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany)
Guanghui Dai, Jun Yang, Siran Lu, Conghong Huang, Jing Jin, Peng Jiang, Pengbo Yan
Biodiesel produced from woody oil plants is considered a green substitute for fossil fuels. However, a potential negative impact of growing woody oil plants on a large scale is the introduction of highly invasive species into susceptible regions. In this study, we examined the potential invasion risk of woody oil plants in China's protected areas under future climate conditions. We simulated the current and future potential distributions of three invasive woody oil plants, Jatropha curcas, Ricinus communis, and Aleurites moluccana, under two climate change scenarios (RCP2...
January 18, 2018: Scientific Reports
Cui-Jing Zhang, Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo, John E Drake, Peter B Reich, Mark G Tjoelker, David T Tissue, Jun-Tao Wang, Ji-Zheng He, Brajesh K Singh
Plant characteristics in different provenances within a single species may vary in response to climate change, which might alter soil microbial communities and ecosystem functions. We conducted a glasshouse experiment and grew seedlings of three provenances (temperate, subtropical and tropical origins) of a tree species (i.e. Eucalyptus tereticornis) at different growth temperatures (18, 21.5, 25, 28.5, 32 and 35.5°C) for 54 days. At the end of the experiment, bacterial and fungal community composition, diversity and abundance were characterized...
January 12, 2018: Environmental Microbiology Reports
Ishara Perera, Saman Seneweera, Naoki Hirotsu
Myo-inositol hexaphosphate, also known as phytic acid (PA), is the most abundant storage form of phosphorus in seeds. PA acts as a strong chelator of metal cations to form phytate and is considered an anti-nutrient as it reduces the bioavailability of important micronutrients. Although the major nutrient source for more than one-half of the global population, rice is a poor source of essential micronutrients. Therefore, biofortification and reducing the PA content of rice have arisen as new strategies for increasing micronutrient bioavailability in rice...
January 11, 2018: Rice
Haifeng Tian, Mingquan Wu, Li Wang, Zheng Niu
Areas and spatial distribution information of paddy rice are important for managing food security, water use, and climate change. However, there are many difficulties in mapping paddy rice, especially mapping multi-season paddy rice in rainy regions, including differences in phenology, the influence of weather, and farmland fragmentation. To resolve these problems, a novel multi-season paddy rice mapping approach based on Sentinel-1A and Landsat-8 data is proposed. First, Sentinel-1A data were enhanced based on the fact that the backscattering coefficient of paddy rice varies according to its growth stage...
January 11, 2018: Sensors
Trevor D S Bloom, Aquila Flower, Eric G DeChaine
Species Distribution Models (SDMs) are widely used to understand environmental controls on species' ranges and to forecast species range shifts in response to climatic changes. The quality of input data is crucial determinant of the model's accuracy. While museum records can be useful sources of presence data for many species, they do not always include accurate geographic coordinates. Therefore, actual locations must be verified through the process of georeferencing. We present a practical, standardized manual georeferencing method (the Spatial Analysis Georeferencing Accuracy (SAGA) protocol) to classify the spatial resolution of museum records specifically for building improved SDMs...
January 2018: Ecology and Evolution
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