Read by QxMD icon Read

reward prediction error

Maike C Herbort, Joram Soch, Torsten Wüstenberg, Kerstin Krauel, Maia Pujara, Michael Koenigs, Jürgen Gallinat, Henrik Walter, Stefan Roepke, Björn H Schott
Patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) frequently exhibit impulsive behavior, and self-reported impulsivity is typically higher in BPD patients when compared to healthy controls. Previous functional neuroimaging studies have suggested a link between impulsivity, the ventral striatal response to reward anticipation, and prediction errors. Here we investigated the striatal neural response to monetary gain and loss anticipation and their relationship with impulsivity in 21 female BPD patients and 23 age-matched female healthy controls using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)...
2016: NeuroImage: Clinical
Jing Wang, Zhaofeng Chen, Xiaozhe Peng, Tiantian Yang, Peng Li, Fengyu Cong, Hong Li
To investigate brain activity during the reinforcement learning process in social contexts is a topic of increasing research interest. Previous studies have mainly focused on using electroencephalograms (EEGs) for feedback evaluation in reinforcement learning tasks by measuring event-related potentials. Few studies have investigated the time-frequency (TF) profiles of a cue that manifested whether a following feedback is available or not after decision-making. Moreover, it remains unclear whether the TF profiles of the cue interact with different agents to whom the feedback related...
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
Hideyuki Matsumoto, Ju Tian, Naoshige Uchida, Mitsuko Watabe-Uchida
Dopamine is thought to regulate learning from appetitive and aversive events. Here we examined how optogenetically-identified dopamine neurons in the lateral ventral tegmental area of mice respond to aversive events in different conditions. In low reward contexts, most dopamine neurons were exclusively inhibited by aversive events, and expectation reduced dopamine neurons' responses to reward and punishment. When a single odor predicted both reward and punishment, dopamine neurons' responses to that odor reflected the integrated value of both outcomes...
October 19, 2016: ELife
Ayaka Kato, Kenji Morita
It has been suggested that dopamine (DA) represents reward-prediction-error (RPE) defined in reinforcement learning and therefore DA responds to unpredicted but not predicted reward. However, recent studies have found DA response sustained towards predictable reward in tasks involving self-paced behavior, and suggested that this response represents a motivational signal. We have previously shown that RPE can sustain if there is decay/forgetting of learned-values, which can be implemented as decay of synaptic strengths storing learned-values...
October 2016: PLoS Computational Biology
Stuart F White, Patrick Tyler, Mary L Botkin, Anna K Erway, Laura C Thornton, Venkata Kolli, Kayla Pope, Harma Meffert, R James Blair
Individuals with substance abuse (SA) histories show impairment in the computations necessary for decision-making, including expected value (EV) and prediction error (PE). Neuroimaging findings, however, have been inconsistent. Sixteen youth with (SApositive) and 29 youth without (SAnegative) substance abuse histories completed a passive avoidance task while undergoing functional MRI. The groups did not significantly differ on age, gender composition or IQ. Behavioral results indicated that SApositive youth showed significantly less learning than SAnegative youth over the task...
September 21, 2016: Psychiatry Research
Juliet Y Davidow, Karin Foerde, Adriana Galván, Daphna Shohamy
Adolescents are notorious for engaging in reward-seeking behaviors, a tendency attributed to heightened activity in the brain's reward systems during adolescence. It has been suggested that reward sensitivity in adolescence might be adaptive, but evidence of an adaptive role has been scarce. Using a probabilistic reinforcement learning task combined with reinforcement learning models and fMRI, we found that adolescents showed better reinforcement learning and a stronger link between reinforcement learning and episodic memory for rewarding outcomes...
October 5, 2016: Neuron
Masayuki Matsumoto
Midbrain dopamine neurons are activated by reward and sensory cue that predicts reward. Their responses resemble reward prediction error that indicates the discrepancy between obtained and expected reward values, which has been thought to play an important role as a teaching signal in reinforcement learning. Indeed, pharmacological blockade of dopamine transmission interferes with reinforcement learning. Recent studies reported, however, that not all dopamine neurons transmit the reward-related signal. They found that a subset of dopamine neurons transmits signals related to non-rewarding, salient experiences such as aversive stimulations and cognitively demanding events...
October 2016: Brain and Nerve, Shinkei Kenkyū No Shinpo
Yan Gu, Xueping Hu, Weigang Pan, Chun Yang, Lijun Wang, Yiyuan Li, Antao Chen
Feedback information is essential for us to adapt appropriately to the environment. The feedback-related negativity (FRN), a frontocentral negative deflection after the delivery of feedback, has been found to be larger for outcomes that are worse than expected, and it reflects a reward prediction error derived from the midbrain dopaminergic projections to the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), as stated in reinforcement learning theory. In contrast, the prediction of response-outcome (PRO) model claims that the neural activity in the mediofrontal cortex (mPFC), especially the ACC, is sensitive to the violation of expectancy, irrespective of the valence of feedback...
October 3, 2016: Scientific Reports
Agnes Norbury, Vincent Valton, Geraint Rees, Jonathan P Roiser, Masud Husain
UNLABELLED: Why are some people strongly motivated by intense sensory experiences? Here we investigated how people encode the value of an intense sensory experience compared with economic reward, and how this varies according to stimulation-seeking preference. Specifically, we used a novel behavioral task in combination with computational modeling to derive the value individuals assigned to the opportunity to experience an intense tactile stimulus (mild electric shock). We then examined functional imaging data recorded during task performance to see how the opportunity to experience the sensory stimulus was encoded in stimulation-seekers versus stimulation-avoiders...
September 28, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
Stuart F White, Marilla Geraci, Elizabeth Lewis, Joseph Leshin, Cindy Teng, Bruno Averbeck, Harma Meffert, Monique Ernst, James R Blair, Christian Grillon, Karina S Blair
OBJECTIVE: Deficits in reinforcement-based decision making have been reported in generalized anxiety disorder. However, the pathophysiology of these deficits is largely unknown; published studies have mainly examined adolescents, and the integrity of core functional processes underpinning decision making remains undetermined. In particular, it is unclear whether the representation of reinforcement prediction error (PE) (the difference between received and expected reinforcement) is disrupted in generalized anxiety disorder...
September 15, 2016: American Journal of Psychiatry
Rebecca Boehme, Robert C Lorenz, Tobias Gleich, Lydia Romund, Patricia Pelz, Sabrina Golde, Eva Flemming, Andrew Wold, Lorenz Deserno, Joachim Behr, Diana Raufelder, Andreas Heinz, Anne Beck
Adolescence is a critical maturation period for human cognitive control and executive function. In this study, a large sample of adolescents (n = 85) performed a reversal learning task during functional magnetic resonance imaging. We analyzed behavioral data using a reinforcement learning model to provide individually fitted parameters and imaging data with regard to reward prediction errors (PE). Following a model-based approach, we formed two groups depending on whether individuals tended to update expectations predominantly for the chosen stimulus or also for the unchosen one...
September 15, 2016: European Journal of Neuroscience
Michael P I Becker, Alexander M Nitsch, Johannes Hewig, Wolfgang H R Miltner, Thomas Straube
Several regions of the frontal cortex interact with striatal and amygdala regions to mediate the evaluation of reward-related information and subsequent adjustment of response choices. Recent theories discuss the particular relevance of dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) for switching behavior; consecutively, ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) is involved in mediating exploitative behaviors by tracking reward values unfolding after the behavioral switch. Amygdala, on the other hand, has been implied in coding the valence of stimulus-outcome associations and the ventral striatum (VS) has consistently been shown to code a reward prediction error (RPE)...
September 10, 2016: NeuroImage
Ju Tian, Ryan Huang, Jeremiah Y Cohen, Fumitaka Osakada, Dmitry Kobak, Christian K Machens, Edward M Callaway, Naoshige Uchida, Mitsuko Watabe-Uchida
Dopamine neurons encode the difference between actual and predicted reward, or reward prediction error (RPE). Although many models have been proposed to account for this computation, it has been difficult to test these models experimentally. Here we established an awake electrophysiological recording system, combined with rabies virus and optogenetic cell-type identification, to characterize the firing patterns of monosynaptic inputs to dopamine neurons while mice performed classical conditioning tasks. We found that each variable required to compute RPE, including actual and predicted reward, was distributed in input neurons in multiple brain areas...
September 21, 2016: Neuron
Alice Mason, Casimir Ludwig, Simon Farrell
Reward is thought to enhance episodic memory formation via dopaminergic consolidation. Bunzeck, Dayan, Dolan, and Duzel [(2010). A common mechanism for adaptive scaling of reward and novelty. Human Brain Mapping, 31, 1380-1394] provided functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and behavioural evidence that reward and episodic memory systems are sensitive to the contextual value of a reward-whether it is relatively higher or lower-as opposed to absolute value or prediction error. We carried out a direct replication of their behavioural study and did not replicate their finding that memory performance associated with reward follows this pattern of adaptive scaling...
October 11, 2016: Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology: QJEP
Angela Radulescu, Reka Daniel, Yael Niv
Reinforcement learning (RL) in complex environments relies on selective attention to uncover those aspects of the environment that are most predictive of reward. Whereas previous work has focused on age-related changes in RL, it is not known whether older adults learn differently from younger adults when selective attention is required. In 2 experiments, we examined how aging affects the interaction between RL and selective attention. Younger and older adults performed a learning task in which only 1 stimulus dimension was relevant to predicting reward, and within it, 1 "target" feature was the most rewarding...
September 5, 2016: Psychology and Aging
Michael R Hill, Erie D Boorman, Itzhak Fried
When learning from direct experience, neurons in the primate brain have been shown to encode a teaching signal used by algorithms in artificial intelligence: the reward prediction error (PE)-the difference between how rewarding an event is, and how rewarding it was expected to be. However, in humans and other species learning often takes place by observing other individuals. Here, we show that, when humans observe other players in a card game, neurons in their rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) encode both the expected value of an observed choice, and the PE after the outcome was revealed...
2016: Nature Communications
Terry Lohrenz, Kenneth T Kishida, P Read Montague
Activity in midbrain dopamine neurons modulates the release of dopamine in terminal structures including the striatum, and controls reward-dependent valuation and choice. This fluctuating release of dopamine is thought to encode reward prediction error (RPE) signals and other value-related information crucial to decision-making, and such models have been used to track prediction error signals in the striatum as encoded by BOLD signals. However, until recently there have been no comparisons of BOLD responses and dopamine responses except for one clear correlation of these two signals in rodents...
October 5, 2016: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
Benjamin Weismüller, Christian Bellebaum
Learning from feedback is a prerequisite for adapting to the environment. Prediction error signals coded by midbrain dopamine (DA) neurons are projected to the basal ganglia and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). It has been suggested that neuronal activity shifts away from the DA system when feedback is delayed. The feedback-related negativity (FRN), an ERP that is generated in the ACC and has been shown to be sensitive to feedback valence and prediction error magnitude, was found to be reduced for delayed feedback...
November 2016: Psychophysiology
Pavan Ramkumar, Brian Dekleva, Sam Cooler, Lee Miller, Konrad Kording
Rewards associated with actions are critical for motivation and learning about the consequences of one's actions on the world. The motor cortices are involved in planning and executing movements, but it is unclear whether they encode reward over and above limb kinematics and dynamics. Here, we report a categorical reward signal in dorsal premotor (PMd) and primary motor (M1) neurons that corresponds to an increase in firing rates when a trial was not rewarded regardless of whether or not a reward was expected...
2016: PloS One
Ernest Mas-Herrero, Josep Marco-Pallarés
Reinforcement learning requires the dynamic interplay of several specialized networks distributed across the brain. A potential mechanism to establish accurate temporal coordination among these paths is through the synchronization of neuronal activity to a common rhythm of neuronal firing. Previous EEG studies have suggested that theta oscillatory activity might be crucial in the integration of information from motivational and attentional paths that converge into the medial Prefrontal Cortex (mPFC) during reward-guided learning...
August 15, 2016: NeuroImage
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"