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Julia Engelhorn, Franziska Turck
Genome-wide analyses of chromatin factor-binding sites or histone modification localization generate lists of up to several thousand potential target genes. For many model organisms, large annotation databases are available to help with the characterization and classification of genomic datasets. The term meta-analysis has been coined for this type of multi-database comparison. In this chapter, we describe a workflow to perform a transcriptional and functional analysis of genome-wide target genes. Sources of transcription data and clustering tools to subdivide genes according to their expression pattern are described...
2017: Methods in Molecular Biology
Andiara Schwingel, Angela R Wiley, Margarita Teran-Garcia, Jennifer McCaffrey, Patricia Gálvez, Marcela Vizcarra
Promotoras are identified as a unique group of community health workers adept at reducing health disparities. This qualitative study was conducted to better understand perceptions of the term promotora, broadly used in research but not well documented in everyday Latina vocabulary. Six focus groups to better understand perceptions of the term promotora were conducted with 36 Latina women living in three nonmetropolitan areas in Illinois. Results suggest that Latina participants in the study do not understand the meaning of "promotora" in the same way as it is used in the literature...
October 18, 2016: Health Promotion Practice
Nairán Ramírez-Esparza, Adrián García-Sierra, Patricia K Kuhl
This study tested the impact of child-directed language input on language development in Spanish-English bilingual infants (N = 25, 11- and 14-month-olds from the Seattle metropolitan area), across languages and independently for each language, controlling for socioeconomic status. Language input was characterized by social interaction variables, defined in terms of speech style ("parentese" vs. standard speech) and social context (one-on-one vs. group). Correlations between parentese one-on-one and productive vocabulary at 24 months (n = 18) were found across languages and in each language independently...
October 19, 2016: Child Development
Zaheed Damani, Gail MacKean, Eric Bohm, Brie DeMone, Brock Wright, Tom Noseworthy, Jayna Holroyd-Leduc, Deborah A Marshall
BACKGROUND: Policy dialogues are critical for developing responsive, effective, sustainable, evidence-informed policy. Our multidisciplinary team, including researchers, physicians and senior decision-makers, comprehensively evaluated The Winnipeg Central Intake Service, a single-entry model in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to improve patient access to hip/knee replacement surgery. We used the evaluation findings to develop five evidence-informed policy directions to help improve access to scheduled clinical services across Manitoba...
October 18, 2016: Health Research Policy and Systems
Carl Savage, Louise Parke, Mia von Knorring, Pamela Mazzocato
BACKGROUND: Health care has experimented with many different quality improvement (QI) approaches with greater variation in name than content. This has been dubbed pseudoinnovation. However, it could also be that the subtleties and differences are not clearly understood. To explore this further, the purpose of this study was to explore how hospital managers perceive lean in the context of QI. METHODS: We used a qualitative study design with semi-structured interviews to explore twelve top managers' perceptions of the relationship between lean and quality improvement (QI) at a university-affiliated hospital...
October 19, 2016: BMC Health Services Research
Christoph Ahlgrim, Oliver Maenner, Manfred W Baumstark
BACKGROUND: Speech recognition software might increase productivity in clinical documentation. However, low user satisfaction with speech recognition software has been observed. In this case study, an approach for implementing a speech recognition software package at a university-based outpatient department is presented. METHODS: Methods to create a specific dictionary for the context "sports medicine" and a shared vocabulary learning function are demonstrated. The approach is evaluated for user satisfaction (using a questionnaire before and 10 weeks after software implementation) and its impact on the time until the final medical document was saved into the system...
October 18, 2016: BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making
Usha Goswami, Lisa Barnes, Natasha Mead, Alan James Power, Victoria Leong
Children with developmental dyslexia are characterized by phonological difficulties across languages. Classically, this 'phonological deficit' in dyslexia has been investigated with tasks using single-syllable words. Recently, however, several studies have demonstrated difficulties in prosodic awareness in dyslexia. Potential prosodic effects in short-term memory have not yet been investigated. Here we create a new instrument based on three-syllable words that vary in stress patterns, to investigate whether prosodic similarity (the same prosodic pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables) exerts systematic effects on short-term memory...
October 17, 2016: Dyslexia: the Journal of the British Dyslexia Association
Shula Chiat, Kamila Polišenská
Purpose: As a recognized indicator of language impairment, nonword repetition has unique potential for distinguishing language impairment from difficulties due to limited experience and knowledge of a language. This study focused on a new Crosslinguistic Nonword Repetition framework, comprising 3 tests that vary the phonological characteristics of nonwords, in the quest for an assessment that minimizes effects of language experience and knowledge and thereby maximizes potential for assessing children with diverse linguistic experience...
October 17, 2016: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research: JSLHR
Sari Ylinen, Alexis Bosseler, Katja Junttila, Minna Huotilainen
The ability to predict future events in the environment and learn from them is a fundamental component of adaptive behavior across species. Here we propose that inferring predictions facilitates speech processing and word learning in the early stages of language development. Twelve- and 24-month olds' electrophysiological brain responses to heard syllables are faster and more robust when the preceding word context predicts the ending of a familiar word. For unfamiliar, novel word forms, however, word-expectancy violation generates a prediction error response, the strength of which significantly correlates with children's vocabulary scores at 12 months...
October 16, 2016: Developmental Science
Kathryn E Bangs, Katherine S Binder
Adult Basic Education programs are under pressure to develop and deliver instruction that promotes rapid and sustained literacy development. We describe a novel approach to a literacy intervention that focuses on morphemes, which are the smallest meaningful units contained in words. We argue that if you teach learners that big words are comprised of smaller components (i.e., morphemes), you will provide those students with the skills to figure out the meanings of new words. Research with children has demonstrated that teaching them about morphemes improves word recognition, spelling, vocabulary, and comprehension (Bowers & Kirby, 2009; Kirk & Gillon, 2009; Nunes, Bryant, & Olsson, 2003)...
2016: Journal of Research and Practice for Adult Literacy, Secondary, and Basic Education
János Jakucs, Eszter Bánffy, Krisztián Oross, Vanda Voicsek, Christopher Bronk Ramsey, Elaine Dunbar, Bernd Kromer, Alex Bayliss, Daniela Hofmann, Peter Marshall, Alasdair Whittle
Perhaps nowhere in European prehistory does the idea of clearly-defined cultural boundaries remain more current than in the initial Neolithic, where the southeast-northwest trend of the spread of farming crosses what is perceived as a sharp divide between the Balkans and central Europe. This corresponds to a distinction between the Vinča culture package, named for a classic site in Serbia, with its characteristic pottery assemblage and absence of longhouses, and the Linearbandkeramik (LBK), with equally diagnostic but different pottery, and its apparently culturally-diagnostic longhouses, extending in a more northerly belt through central Europe westward to the Dutch coast...
2016: Journal of World Prehistory
Manor Askenazi, Hisham Ben Hamidane, Johannes Graumann
The evolution of data exchange in Mass Spectrometry spans decades and has ranged from human-readable text files representing individual scans or collections thereof (McDonald et al., 2004) through the official standard XML-based (Harold, Means, & Udemadu, 2005) data interchange standard (Deutsch, 2012), to increasingly compressed (Teleman et al., 2014) variants of this standard sometimes requiring purely binary adjunct files (Römpp et al., 2011). While the desire to maintain even partial human readability is understandable, the inherent mismatch between XML's textual and irregular format relative to the numeric and highly regular nature of actual spectral data, along with the explosive growth in dataset scales and the resulting need for efficient (binary and indexed) access has led to a phenomenon referred to as "technical drift" (Davis, 2013)...
October 14, 2016: Mass Spectrometry Reviews
K E Williams, D Berthelsen, M Viviani, J M Nicholson
BACKGROUND: Playgroups are a relatively unique form of family support programme that is common in Australia which has high community acceptance and significant government investment. However, limited evidence exists regarding the effectiveness of playgroups to achieve better outcomes for children and their parents. This study describes patterns of playgroup participation for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families with young children and examines the extent to which participation from birth to three years is associated with subsequent child, parent and community outcomes...
October 13, 2016: Child: Care, Health and Development
Zhenghan Qi, Sara D Beach, Amy S Finn, Jennifer Minas, Calvin Goetz, Brian Chan, John D E Gabrieli
Language learning aptitude during adulthood varies markedly across individuals. An individual's native-language ability has been associated with success in learning a new language as an adult. However, little is known about how native-language processing affects learning success and what neural markers of native-language processing, if any, are related to success in learning. We therefore related variation in electrophysiology during native-language processing to success in learning a novel artificial language...
October 11, 2016: Neuropsychologia
Marta Nieto, Laura Ros, Gloria Medina, Jorge J Ricarte, José M Latorre
Over the last two decades, there has been a growing interest in the study of the development of executive functions (EF) in preschool children due to their relationship with different cognitive, psychological, social and academic domains. Early detection of individual differences in executive functioning can have major implications for basic and applied research. Consequently, there is a key need for assessment tools adapted to preschool skills: Shape School has been shown to be a suitable task for this purpose...
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
Ora Oudgenoeg-Paz, M Chiel J M Volman, Paul P M Leseman
Recent empirical evidence demonstrates relationships between motor and language development that are partially mediated by exploration. This is in line with the embodied cognition approach to development that views language as grounded in real-life sensorimotor interactions with the environment. This view implies that the relations between motor and linguistic skills should be specific. Moreover, as motor development initially changes the possibilities children have to explore the environment, initial relations between motor and linguistic skills should become weaker over time...
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
Luigi Pagliaro, Agostino Colli
The clinician - the doctor who treats sick people - should be able to establish a good human relationship with his or her patients and their family; should be able to reach a diagnosis even in patients with rare diseases, or atypical presentations - or should refer the patient to a senior colleague; and should be able to recommend the best treatment (or no treatment at all). And he - or she - should be able to draw these abilities from the "deliberate practice" according to Ericsson, i.e. from the combination of experience with reflection - not, or with much lesser strength, from the medical literature as suggested by Evidence-Based Medicine...
September 2016: Recenti Progressi in Medicina
Susan Smith, James Fisher, Iain Goff
BACKGROUND: During their training, medical students are expected to acquire the ability to use thousands of new terms that make up the medical lexicon. Clear communication requires knowledge of this lexicon. We developed a simple word game, MediLex, to facilitate the development of these skills. This paper describes the intervention and evaluates students' experiences. METHODS: MediLex is a card-based description game played in small groups. One hundred cards contain 500 medical terms grouped into five categories...
October 6, 2016: Clinical Teacher
Michael G Kahn, Tiffany J Callahan, Juliana Barnard, Alan E Bauck, Jeff Brown, Bruce N Davidson, Hossein Estiri, Carsten Goerg, Erin Holve, Steven G Johnson, Siaw-Teng Liaw, Marianne Hamilton-Lopez, Daniella Meeker, Toan C Ong, Patrick Ryan, Ning Shang, Nicole G Weiskopf, Chunhua Weng, Meredith N Zozus, Lisa Schilling
OBJECTIVE: Harmonized data quality (DQ) assessment terms, methods, and reporting practices can establish a common understanding of the strengths and limitations of electronic health record (EHR) data for operational analytics, quality improvement, and research. Existing published DQ terms were harmonized to a comprehensive unified terminology with definitions and examples and organized into a conceptual framework to support a common approach to defining whether EHR data is 'fit' for specific uses...
2016: EGEMS
Paula Cronin, Rebecca Reeve, Patricia Mccabe, Rosalie Viney, Stephen Goodall
PURPOSE: This study investigated the relationship between children's language difficulties and health care costs using the 2004-2012 Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC). METHOD: Language difficulties were defined as scores ≤1.25SD below the standardised mean on measures of directly assessed receptive vocabulary (4-9 years) and teacher-reported language and literacy (10-13 years). Participant data were individually linked to administrative data, which were sourced from Australia's universal subsidised healthcare scheme (Medicare)...
October 7, 2016: International Journal of Speech-language Pathology
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