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M Aurich, D Albrecht, P Angele, C Becher, S Fickert, J Fritz, P E Müller, P Niemeyer, M Pietschmann, G Spahn, M Walther
Background: Osteochondral lesions (OCL) of the ankle are a common cause of ankle pain. Although the precise pathophysiology has not been fully elucidated, it can be assumed that a variety of factors are responsible, mainly including traumatic events such as ankle sprains. Advances in arthroscopy and imaging techniques, in particular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), have improved the possibilities for the diagnosis of OCLs of the ankle. Moreover, these technologies aim at developing new classification systems and modern treatment strategies...
October 21, 2016: Zeitschrift Für Orthopädie und Unfallchirurgie
Katherine Lincoln, Jessica Hyde
BACKGROUND: In recent years, a new technology for autologous epidermal harvesting has been developed to produce epidermal skin grafts (ESGs) for use over wounds. This technology employs negative pressure and heat to raise the epidermal skin layer, allowing for consistent and reproducible epidermal harvesting. The aim of this case series is to present the authors' experience using an automated, epidermal harvesting system to produce ESGs to treat wounds of patients with multiple comorbidities...
October 2016: Wounds: a Compendium of Clinical Research and Practice
Pier Francesco Bassi
If we think about the launch date of Mitomycin C, we could think that this supplement is very much focused on history of Medicine, and, yes, Mitomycin certainly has been a main contributor to the history of Urology. However, it is even more striking to think that even after fifty years of its use by Urologists worlwide, Mitomycin C remains an absolute "Must". The simplicity of use, the efficacy and the tolerability of Mitomycin explain its established role. In fact, "long standing" does not mean "old". The new technologies, introduced progressively in the last decades, have fully confirmed the present and future role of this drug, that is well illustrated in the articles contained in this supplement...
October 4, 2016: Urologia
Nicolas Renaud, Michelle A Harris, Arunoday P N Singh, Yuri A Berlin, Mark A Ratner, Michael R Wasielewski, Frederick D Lewis, Ferdinand C Grozema
Charge transport through the DNA double helix is of fundamental interest in chemistry and biochemistry, but also has potential technological applications such as for DNA-based nanoelectronics. For the latter, it is of considerable interest to explore ways to influence or enhance charge transfer. In this Article we demonstrate a new mechanism for DNA charge transport, namely 'deep-hole transfer', which involves long-range migration of a hole through low-lying electronic states of the nucleobases. Here, we demonstrate, in a combined experimental and theoretical study, that it is possible to achieve such transfer behaviour by changing the energetics of charge injection...
November 2016: Nature Chemistry
Iliana Tantcheva-Poór, Vinzenz Oji, Cristina Has
Recent advances in genetic technology have found their way into clinical dermatology. Approximately one third of all hereditary disorders show characteristic cutaneous findings. Moreover, human skin easily provides samples for studying the mechanisms of genetic mosaicism, as well as the underlying functional defects due to mutated proteins. Diagnosing hereditary skin disorders remains, however, a challenging task due to the rarity of genodermatoses and their diversity, overlapping or heterogeneous phenotypes, huge amount of new information, and complicated nomenclature and classifications...
October 2016: Journal der Deutschen Dermatologischen Gesellschaft, Journal of the German Society of Dermatology: JDDG
Chris R Triggle, David J Triggle
Preclinical Research With the almost global availability of the Internet comes the expectation of universal accessibility to knowledge, including scientific knowledge-particularly that generated by public funding. Currently this is not the case. In this Commentary we discuss access to this knowledge, the politics that govern peer review and publication, and the role of this knowledge as a public good in medicine. With the almost global availability of the Internet comes the expectation of universal accessibility to knowledge, including scientific knowledge-particularly that generated by public funding...
October 21, 2016: Drug Development Research
Kristian Jensen, Rikke Krusenstjerna-Hafstrøm, Jesper Lohse, Kenneth H Petersen, Helene Derand
In clinical routine pathology today, detection of protein in intact formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue is limited to immunohistochemistry, which is semi-quantitative. This study presents a new and reliable quantitative immunohistochemistry method, qIHC, based on a novel amplification system that enables quantification of protein directly in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue by counting of dots. The qIHC technology can be combined with standard immunohistochemistry, and assessed using standard bright-field microscopy or image analysis...
October 21, 2016: Modern Pathology: An Official Journal of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, Inc
James Raftery, Steve Hanney, Trish Greenhalgh, Matthew Glover, Amanda Blatch-Jones
BACKGROUND: This report reviews approaches and tools for measuring the impact of research programmes, building on, and extending, a 2007 review. OBJECTIVES: (1) To identify the range of theoretical models and empirical approaches for measuring the impact of health research programmes; (2) to develop a taxonomy of models and approaches; (3) to summarise the evidence on the application and use of these models; and (4) to evaluate the different options for the Health Technology Assessment (HTA) programme...
October 2016: Health Technology Assessment: HTA
Muhammad Abu-Elmagd, Mourad Assidi, Ashraf Dallol, Abdelbaset Buhmeida, Peter Natesan Pushparaj, Gauthaman Kalamegam, Emad Al-Hamzi, Jerry W Shay, Stephen W Scherer, Ashok Agarwal, Bruce Budowle, Mamdooh Gari, Adeel Chaudhary, Adel Abuzenadah, Mohammed Al-Qahtani
The Third International Genomic Medicine Conference (3(rd) IGMC) was organised by the Centre of Excellence in Genomic Medicine Research (CEGMR) at the King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). This conference is a continuation of a series of meetings, which began with the first International Genomic Medicine Conference (1(st) IGMC, 2011) followed by the second International Genomic Medicine Conference (2(nd) IGMC, 2013). The 3(rd) IGMC meeting presented as a timely opportunity to bring scientists from across the world to gather, discuss, and exchange recent advances in the field of genomics and genetics in general as well as practical information on using these new technologies in different basic and clinical applications...
October 17, 2016: BMC Genomics
Xueyuan Cao, Kristine R Crews, James Downing, Jatinder Lamba, Stanley B Pounds
BACKGROUND: As new technologies allow investigators to collect multiple forms of molecular data (genomic, epigenomic, transcriptomic, etc) and multiple endpoints on a clinical trial cohort, it will become necessary to effectively integrate all these data in a way that reliably identifies biologically important genes. METHODS: We introduce CC-PROMISE as an integrated data analysis method that combines components of canonical correlation (CC) and projection onto the most interesting evidence (PROMISE)...
October 6, 2016: BMC Bioinformatics
Xingxing Wu, Binbin Yu, Wei Xu, Zheng Fan, Zucheng Wu, Huimin Zhang
As the main greenhouse gas, CO2 is considered as a threat in the context of global warming. Many available technologies to reduce CO2 emission was about CO2 separation from coal combustion and geological sequestration. However, how to deal with the cost-effective storage of CO2 has become a new challenge. Moreover, chromium pollution, the treatment of which requires huge energy consumption, has attracted people's widespread attention. This study is aimed to develop the sequestration of CO2 via chromium slag...
October 21, 2016: Environmental Technology
Keith Harrison, John Peek, Michael Chapman, Mark Bowman
BACKGROUND: Assisted reproductive technology (ART) clinics in Australia and New Zealand are accredited and licensed against a Code of Practice audited by certifying bodies accredited by the Joint Accreditation System for Australia and New Zealand (JAS-ANZ). The system is administered by the Reproductive Technology Accreditation Committee (RTAC) of the Fertility Society of Australia. AIMS: To review the incidence of variances and findings identified by certifying bodies in Australian and New Zealand ART clinics within the currency of a single version of the Code of Practice...
October 21, 2016: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology
Raliat Onatade, Gavin Miller, Inderjit Sanghera
Background Several clinical pharmacy activities are common to UK hospitals. It is not clear whether these are provided at similar levels, and whether they take similar amounts of time to carry out. Objective To quantify and compare clinical pharmacist ward activities between different UK hospitals. Setting Seven acute hospitals in the Greater London area (UK). Methods A list of common ward activities was developed. On five consecutive days, pharmacists visiting hospital wards documented total time spent and how many of each activity they undertook...
October 20, 2016: International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy
Matthias Willmann, Silke Peter
The increasing threat of antimicrobial resistance poses one of the greatest challenges to modern medicine. The collection of all antimicrobial resistance genes carried by various microorganisms in the human body is called the human resistome and represents the source of resistance in pathogens that can eventually cause life-threatening and untreatable infections. A deep understanding of the human resistome and its multilateral interaction with various environments is necessary for developing proper measures that can efficiently reduce the spread of resistance...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Molecular Medicine: Official Organ of the "Gesellschaft Deutscher Naturforscher und Ärzte"
Susan Heavey, Sinead Cuffe, Stephen Finn, Vincent Young, Ronan Ryan, Siobhan Nicholson, Niamh Leonard, Niall McVeigh, Martin Barr, Kenneth O'Byrne, Kathy Gately
Clinical PI3K inhibition has been somewhat disappointing, due to both inadequate patient stratification and compensatory cell signalling through bypass mechanisms. As such, investigation of PI3K-MEK co-targeted inhibition has been recommended. With high mortality rates and a clear need for new therapeutic intervention strategies, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is an important setting to investigate the effectiveness of this approach.Here, 174 NSCLC tumours were screened for 150 mutations by Fluidigm technology, with 15 patients being profiled for phosphoprotein expression...
October 19, 2016: Oncotarget
Fernando Velayos, Priya Kathpalia, Emily Finlayson
This review chronicles the evolution of dysplasia detection and management in IBD since 1925, the year the first case report of colitis-related colorectal cancer was published. We have grouped advances in colorectal cancer research, endoscopic techniques, surgery, and technology into 4 unequally timed eras, before colonoscopy, early era of colonoscopy, new century, and 2017 and beyond. We conclude that colorectal cancer prevention and dysplasia management for patients with IBD has changed over these periods, from somewhat hopeless to hopeful...
October 17, 2016: Gastroenterology
Jingzhong Xie, Naxin Huo, Shenghui Zhou, Yi Wang, Guanghao Guo, Karin R Deal, Shuhong Ouyang, Yong Liang, Zhenzhong Wang, Lichan Xiao, Tingting Zhu, Tiezhu Hu, Vijay Tiwari, Jianwei Zhang, Hongxia Li, Zhongfu Ni, Yingyin Yao, Huiru Peng, Shengli Zhang, Olin D Anderson, Patrick E McGuire, Jan Dvorak, Ming-Cheng Luo, Zhiyong Liu, Yong Q Gu, Qixin Sun
Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum, AABBDD) is an allohexaploid species derived from two rounds of interspecific hybridizations. A high-quality genome sequence assembly of diploid Aegilops tauschii, the donor of the wheat D genome, will provide a useful platform to study polyploid wheat evolution. A combined approach of BAC pooling and next-generation sequencing technology was employed to sequence the minimum tiling path (MTP) of 3176 BAC clones from the short arm of Ae. tauschii chromosome 3 (At3DS). The final assembly of 135 super-scaffolds with an N50 of 4...
October 5, 2016: Journal of Genetics and Genomics, Yi Chuan Xue Bao
Antonella Riva, Paolo Morazzoni, Christian Artaria, Pietro Allegrini, Jürgen Meins, Daniele Savio, Giovanni Appendino, Manfred Schubert-Zsilavecz, Mona Abdel-Tawab
BACKGROUND: The oral administration of the gum resin extracts of Indian frankincense (Boswellia serrata Roxb. ex Colebr) results in very low plasma concentrations of boswellic acids (BAs), being far below the pharmacologically active concentrations required in vitro for anti-inflammatory activity. For that reason the use of Indian frankincense in clinical practice and pharmaceutical development has substantially lagged behind. Recently the application of new formulation technologies resulted in a formulation of frankincense extract with lecithin, which revealed improved absorption and tissue penetration of BAs in a rodent study, leading for the first time to plasma concentrations of BAs in the range of their anti-inflammatory activity...
November 15, 2016: Phytomedicine: International Journal of Phytotherapy and Phytopharmacology
Yongjin He, Jingbo Li, Sitharam Kodali, Bilian Chen, Zheng Guo
Dramatic decline in the quality and quantity of ω-3 PUFAs from marine resource demands new environmental-friendly technology to produce high quality ω-3 PUFAs concentrates in a better bioavailable form. Accordingly this work demonstrated an exceptionally highly efficient non-aqueous approach that non-regiospecific and non ω-3 PUFAs preferential Candida antarctica lipase A (CAL-A), functioning as a near-ideal biocatalyst, is capable to directly concentrate ω-3 PUFAs from 20% to 30% in oils to up to >90% in monoacylglycerols form through one step reaction...
March 15, 2017: Food Chemistry
Thais M Uekane, Luca Nicolotti, Alessandra Griglione, Humberto R Bizzo, Patrizia Rubiolo, Carlo Bicchi, Maria Helena M Rocha-Leão, Claudia M Rezende
The volatile fraction of murici, bacuri and sapodilla are here studied because of their increasing interest for consumers, abundance of production in Brazil, and the general demand for new flavors and aromas. Their volatile profiles were studied by two High Concentration Capacity Headspace techniques (HCC-HS), Headspace Solid Phase Microextraction (HS-SPME) and Headspace Sorptive Extraction (HSSE), in combination with GC-MS. Murici volatile fraction mainly contains esters (38%), carboxylic acids (19%), aldehydes (11%), alcohols (14%), others (13%) and sulfur compounds; bacuri is characterized by terpenes (41%), non-terpenic alcohols (24%), esters (15%), aldehydes (6%), and others (12%); sapodilla consists of esters (33%), alcohols (27%), terpenes (18%) and others (21%)...
March 15, 2017: Food Chemistry
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