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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28225774/environmental-characteristics-drive-variation-in-amazonian-understorey-bird-assemblages
#1
Juliana Menger, William E Magnusson, Marti J Anderson, Martin Schlegel, Guy Pe'er, Klaus Henle
Tropical bird assemblages display patterns of high alpha and beta diversity and, as tropical birds exhibit strong habitat specificity, their spatial distributions are generally assumed to be driven primarily by environmental heterogeneity and interspecific interactions. However, spatial distributions of some Amazonian forest birds are also often restricted by large rivers and other large-scale topographic features, suggesting that dispersal limitation may also play a role in driving species' turnover. In this study, we evaluated the effects of environmental characteristics, topographic and spatial variables on variation in local assemblage structure and diversity of birds in an old-growth forest in central Amazonia...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28223505/light-driven-growth-in-amazon-evergreen-forests-explained-by-seasonal-variations-of-vertical-canopy-structure
#2
Hao Tang, Ralph Dubayah
Light-regime variability is an important limiting factor constraining tree growth in tropical forests. However, there is considerable debate about whether radiation-induced green-up during the dry season is real, or an apparent artifact of the remote-sensing techniques used to infer seasonal changes in canopy leaf area. Direct and widespread observations of vertical canopy structures that drive radiation regimes have been largely absent. Here we analyze seasonal dynamic patterns between the canopy and understory layers in Amazon evergreen forests using observations of vertical canopy structure from a spaceborne lidar...
February 21, 2017: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28222925/linking-national-wood-consumption-with-global-biodiversity-and-ecosystem-service-losses
#3
Abhishek Chaudhary, L Roman Carrasco, Thomas Kastner
Identifying the global hotspots of forestry driven species, ecosystem services losses and informing the consuming nations of their environmental footprint domestically and abroad is essential to design demand side interventions and induce sustainable production methods. Here we first use countryside species area relationship model to project species extinctions of four vertebrate taxa (mammals, birds, amphibians and reptiles) due to forest land use in 174 countries. We combine the projected extinctions with a global database on the monetary value of ecosystem services provided by different biomes and with bilateral trade data of wood products to calculate species extinctions and ecosystem services losses inflicted by national wood consumption and international wood trade...
February 17, 2017: Science of the Total Environment
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28218805/functional-nonredundancy-of-elephants-in-a-disturbed-tropical-forest
#4
Nitin Sekar, Chia-Lo Lee, Raman Sukumar
Conservation efforts are often motivated by the threat of global extinction. Yet if conservationists had more information suggesting that the local extirpation of individual species could lead to undesirable ecological effects, conservationists might more frequently attempt to protect or restore such species across their range even if they are not in danger of global extinction. Scientists have seldom measured or quantitatively predicted the functional consequences of species loss, even for large, extinction-prone species that theory suggests should be functionally unique...
February 20, 2017: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28214038/maximising-synergy-among-tropical-plant-systematists-ecologists-and-evolutionary-biologists
#5
REVIEW
Timothy R Baker, R Toby Pennington, Kyle G Dexter, Paul V A Fine, Helen Fortune-Hopkins, Euridice N Honorio, Isau Huamantupa-Chuquimaco, Bente B Klitgård, Gwilym P Lewis, Haroldo C de Lima, Peter Ashton, Christopher Baraloto, Stuart Davies, Michael J Donoghue, Maria Kaye, W John Kress, Caroline E R Lehmann, Abel Monteagudo, Oliver L Phillips, Rodolfo Vasquez
Closer collaboration among ecologists, systematists, and evolutionary biologists working in tropical forests, centred on studies within long-term permanent plots, would be highly beneficial for their respective fields. With a key unifying theme of the importance of vouchered collection and precise identification of species, especially rare ones, we identify four priority areas where improving links between these communities could achieve significant progress in biodiversity and conservation science: (i) increasing the pace of species discovery; (ii) documenting species turnover across space and time; (iii) improving models of ecosystem change; and (iv) understanding the evolutionary assembly of communities and biomes...
February 14, 2017: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28211583/in%C3%A2-situ-temperature-response-of-photosynthesis-of-42-tree-and-liana-species-in-the-canopy-of-two-panamanian-lowland-tropical-forests-with-contrasting-rainfall-regimes
#6
Martijn Slot, Klaus Winter
Tropical forests contribute significantly to the global carbon cycle, but little is known about the temperature response of photosynthetic carbon uptake in tropical species, and how this varies within and across forests. We determined in situ photosynthetic temperature-response curves for upper canopy leaves of 42 tree and liana species from two tropical forests in Panama with contrasting rainfall regimes. On the basis of seedling studies, we hypothesized that species with high photosynthetic capacity - light-demanding, fast-growing species - would have a higher temperature optimum of photosynthesis (TOpt ) than species with low photosynthetic capacity - shade-tolerant, slow-growing species - and that, therefore, TOpt would scale with the position of a species on the slow-fast continuum of plant functional traits...
February 17, 2017: New Phytologist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28208227/integrating-remotely-sensed-fires-for-predicting-deforestation-for-redd
#7
Dolors Armenteras, Cerian Gibbes, Jesús A Anaya, Liliana M Dávalos
Fire is an important tool in tropical forest management, as it alters forest composition, structure, and the carbon budget. The United Nations program on Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) aims to sustainably manage forests, as well as conserve and enhance their carbon stocks. Despite the crucial role of fire management, decision-making on REDD+ interventions fails to systematically include fires. Here, we address this critical knowledge gap in two ways. First, we review REDD+ projects and programs to assess the inclusion of fires in monitoring, reporting and verification (MRV) systems...
February 16, 2017: Ecological Applications: a Publication of the Ecological Society of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28206905/discovery-of-a-novel-alphavirus-related-to-eilat-virus
#8
Kyra Hermanns, Florian Zirkel, Anne Kopp, Marco Marklewitz, Innocent B Rwego, Alejandro Estrada, Thomas R Gillespie, Christian Drosten, Sandra Junglen
Most alphaviruses are transmitted by arthropods and infect vertebrate hosts. An exception is Eilat virus (EILV), the only described alphavirus with a host range restricted to insects. We established a new generic reverse transcription PCR assay for alphaviruses and tested 8860 tropical mosquitoes. We detected a novel alphavirus, tentatively named Taï Forest alphavirus (TALV), in Culex decens mosquitoes collected in Ivory Coast. The full genome was sequenced, and closest similarity was found to EILV. Pairwise amino acid identities to EILV ranged between 67 and 88 % for the corresponding proteins, suggesting that TALV defines a proposed new alphavirus species...
January 2017: Journal of General Virology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28195145/the-nexus-between-forest-fragmentation-in-africa-and-ebola-virus-disease-outbreaks
#9
Maria Cristina Rulli, Monia Santini, David T S Hayman, Paolo D'Odorico
Tropical forests are undergoing land use change in many regions of the world, including the African continent. Human populations living close to forest margins fragmented and disturbed by deforestation may be particularly exposed to zoonotic infections because of the higher likelihood for humans to be in contact with disease reservoirs. Quantitative analysis of the nexus between deforestation and the emergence of Ebola virus disease (EVD), however, is still missing. Here we use land cover change data in conjunction with EVD outbreak records to investigate the association between recent (2004-2014) outbreaks in West and Central Africa, and patterns of land use change in the region...
February 14, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28192618/intra-annual-plasticity-of-growth-mediates-drought-resilience-over-multiple-years-in-tropical-seedling-communities
#10
Michael J O'Brien, Robert Ong, Glen Reynolds
Precipitation patterns are changing across the globe causing more severe and frequent drought for many forest ecosystems. Although research has focused on the resistance of tree populations and communities to these novel precipitation regimes, resilience of forests is also contingent on recovery following drought, which remains poorly understood, especially in aseasonal tropical forests. We used rainfall exclusion shelters to manipulate the inter-annual frequency of drought for diverse seedling communities in a tropical forest and assessed resistance, recovery and resilience of seedling growth and mortality relative to everwet conditions...
February 13, 2017: Global Change Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28191504/distinct-biogeographic-patterns-for-archaea-bacteria-and-fungi-along-the-vegetation-gradient-at-the-continental-scale-in-eastern-china
#11
Bin Ma, Zhongmin Dai, Haizhen Wang, Melissa Dsouza, Xingmei Liu, Yan He, Jianjun Wu, Jorge L M Rodrigues, Jack A Gilbert, Philip C Brookes, Jianming Xu
The natural forest ecosystem in Eastern China, from tropical forest to boreal forest, has declined due to cropland development during the last 300 years, yet little is known about the historical biogeographic patterns and driving processes for the major domains of microorganisms along this continental-scale natural vegetation gradient. We predicted the biogeographic patterns of soil archaeal, bacterial, and fungal communities across 110 natural forest sites along a transect across four vegetation zones in Eastern China...
January 2017: MSystems
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28187659/a-new-tropical-montane-firefly-genus-and-species-active-during-winter-and-endemic-to-the-southeastern-atlantic-rainforest-coleoptera-lampyridae
#12
Luiz Felipe Lima DA Silveira, José Ricardo Miras Mermudes
Here we describe Araucariocladus hiems gen. et sp. nov. (Lampyridae: Amydetinae), a firefly species endemic to high montane forests, and occurring during June, a relatively cool and dry month in the Southeastern Atlantic Rainforest of Brazil. We tentatively place it in Psilocladina McDermott, and discuss the limitations of its classification. We also provide illustrations of key structural features of the new taxa and discuss its affinities.
January 17, 2017: Zootaxa
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28187611/on-the-poorly-known-haplogynae-spiders-of-the-genus-i-ochyrocera-i-simon%C3%A2-araneae-ochyroceratidae-from-mexico-description-of-two-new-species-with-an-updated-identification-key-for-mexican-species
#13
Alejandro Valdez-Mondragón
Two new species of the spider genus Ochyrocera Simon 1891 are described from Mexico. Ochyrocera jarocha new species was collected under rotten trunks and hollow trunks in a tropical rainforest, in San Martin Volcano, Veracruz, Mexico. Ochyrocera pojoj new species was collected in a mixed forest, under rotten trunks, in La Trinitaria, Chiapas, Mexico, which represents the third species described from the state of Chiapas. With the description of the two new species herein, six species of Ochyrocera are recorded from Mexico...
January 26, 2017: Zootaxa
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28186155/a-small-subset-of-protected-areas-are-a-highly-significant-source-of-carbon-emissions
#14
Murray B Collins, Edward T A Mitchard
Protected areas (PAs) aim to protect multiple ecosystem services. However, not all are well protected. For the first time, using published carbon and forest loss maps, we estimate carbon emissions in large forest PAs in tropical countries (N = 2018). We found 36 ± 16 Pg C stored in PA trees, representing 14.5% of all tropical forest biomass carbon. However the PAs lost forest at a mean rate of 0.18% yr(-1) from 2000-2012. Lower protection status areas experienced higher forest losses (e.g. 0.39% yr(-1) in IUCN cat III), yet even highest status areas lost 0...
February 10, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28182628/migratory-timing-rate-routes-and-wintering-areas-of-white-crested-elaenia-elaenia-albiceps-chilensis-a-key-seed-disperser-for-patagonian-forest-regeneration
#15
Susana Patricia Bravo, Victor Rodolfo Cueto, Cristian Andrés Gorosito
Migratory animals often play key ecological roles within the communities they visit throughout their annual journeys. As a consequence of the links between biomes mediated by migrants, changes in one biome could affect remote areas in unpredictable ways. Migratory routes and timing of most Neotropical austral migrants, which breed at south temperate latitudes of South America and overwinter closer to or within tropical latitudes of South America, have yet to be described in detail. As a result, our understanding about how these birds provide links between South American biomes is almost non-existent...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28181524/lack-of-phylogenetic-signals-within-environmental-niches-of-tropical-tree-species-across-life-stages
#16
Caicai Zhang, Jie Yang, Liqing Sha, Xiuqin Ci, Jie Li, Min Cao, Calum Brown, Nathan G Swenson, Luxiang Lin
The lasting imprint of phylogenetic history on current day ecological patterns has long intrigued biologists. Over the past decade ecologists have increasingly sought to quantify phylogenetic signals in environmental niche preferences and, especially, traits to help uncover the mechanisms driving plant community assembly. However, relatively little is known about how phylogenetic patterns in environmental niches and traits compare, leaving significant uncertainty about the ecological implications of trait-based analyses...
February 9, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28179511/spatio-temporal-interactions-facilitate-large-carnivore-sympatry-across-a-resource-gradient
#17
K Ullas Karanth, Arjun Srivathsa, Divya Vasudev, Mahi Puri, Ravishankar Parameshwaran, N Samba Kumar
Species within a guild vary their use of time, space and resources, thereby enabling sympatry. As intra-guild competition intensifies, such behavioural adaptations may become prominent. We assessed mechanisms of facilitating sympatry among dhole (Cuon alpinus), leopard (Panthera pardus) and tiger (Panthera tigris) in tropical forests of India using camera-trap surveys. We examined population-level temporal, spatial and spatio-temporal segregation among them across four reserves representing a gradient of carnivore and prey densities...
February 8, 2017: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28178352/exposure-of-tropical-ecosystems-to-artificial-light-at-night-brazil-as-a-case-study
#18
Juliana Ribeirão de Freitas, Jon Bennie, Waldir Mantovani, Kevin J Gaston
Artificial nighttime lighting from streetlights and other sources has a broad range of biological effects. Understanding the spatial and temporal levels and patterns of this lighting is a key step in determining the severity of adverse effects on different ecosystems, vegetation, and habitat types. Few such analyses have been conducted, particularly for regions with high biodiversity, including the tropics. We used an intercalibrated version of the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS) images of stable nighttime lights to determine what proportion of original and current Brazilian vegetation types are experiencing measurable levels of artificial light and how this has changed in recent years...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28168033/invasive-termites-in-a-changing-climate-a-global-perspective
#19
Grzegorz Buczkowski, Cleo Bertelsmeier
Termites are ubiquitous insects in tropical, subtropical, and warm temperate regions and play an important role in ecosystems. Several termite species are also significant economic pests, mainly in urban areas where they attack human-made structures, but also in natural forest habitats. Worldwide, approximately 28 termite species are considered invasive and have spread beyond their native ranges, often with significant economic consequences. We used predictive climate modeling to provide the first global risk assessment for 13 of the world's most invasive termites...
February 2017: Ecology and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28160641/contribution-of-glomalin-to-dissolve-organic-carbon-under-different-land-uses-and-seasonality-in-dry-tropics
#20
Ashutosh Kumar Singh, Apurva Rai, Vivek Pandey, Nandita Singh
Glomalin related soil protein (GRSP) is a hydrophobic glycoprotein that is significant for soil organic carbon (SOC) persistence and sequestration, owing to its large contribution to SOC pool and long turnover time. However, the contribution of GRSP to dissolve OC (DOC) leach from soil is not yet comprehensively explored, though it could have implication in understanding SOC dynamics. We, therefore, aim to measure the contribution of GRSP to DOC, in a range of land uses and climatic seasons in the dry tropical ecosystem...
February 1, 2017: Journal of Environmental Management
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