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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29346705/effect-of-dys-1-mutation-on-gene-expression-profile-in-space-flown-c-elegans
#1
Dan Xu, Ying Gao, Lin Guo, Chenggang Lin, Yeqing Sun
INTRODUCTION: Dystrophin-like dys-1 gene expression increases in the body-wall muscles of Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) after spaceflight. Here, we utilized a dys-1(cx18) mutant to analyze the molecular adaptive responses of C. elegans to spaceflight. METHODS: DNA microarrays were performed to identify differentially expressed genes between wild-type and dys-1 mutant worms after spaceflight. We performed Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analyses, predicted human diseases and screened out key genes for human muscle diseases with NextBio...
January 18, 2018: Muscle & Nerve
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29320953/spaceflight-activates-protein-kinase-c-alpha-signaling-and-modifies-the-developmental-stage-of-human-neonatal-cardiovascular-progenitor-cells
#2
Jonathan Baio, Aida F Martinez, Leonard L Bailey, Nahidh Hasaniya, Michael Pecaut, Mary Kearns-Jonker
Spaceflight impacts cardiovascular function in astronauts; however, its impact on cardiac development and the stem cells that form the basis for cardiac repair is unknown. Accordingly, further research is needed to uncover the potential relevance of such changes to human health. Using simulated microgravity (SMG) generated via two-dimensional clinorotation and culture aboard the International Space Station (ISS), we assessed the effects of mechanical unloading on human neonatal cardiovascular progenitor cell (CPC) developmental properties and signaling...
January 10, 2018: Stem Cells and Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29233237/medical-implications-of-space-radiation-exposure-due-to-low-altitude-polar-orbits
#3
Jeffery C Chancellor, Serena M Auñon-Chancellor, John Charles
INTRODUCTION: Space radiation research has progressed rapidly in recent years, but there remain large uncertainties in predicting and extrapolating biological responses to humans. Exposure to cosmic radiation and solar particle events (SPEs) may pose a critical health risk to future spaceflight crews and can have a serious impact on all biomedical aspects of space exploration. The relatively minimal shielding of the cancelled 1960s Manned Orbiting Laboratory (MOL) program's space vehicle and the high inclination polar orbits would have left the crew susceptible to high exposures of cosmic radiation and high dose-rate SPEs that are mostly unpredictable in frequency and intensity...
January 1, 2018: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29198313/modifiers-of-radiation-effects-in-the-eye
#4
REVIEW
Norman J Kleiman, Fiona A Stewart, Eric J Hall
World events, including the threat of radiological terrorism and the fear of nuclear accidents, have highlighted an urgent need to develop medical countermeasures to prevent or reduce radiation injury. Similarly, plans for manned spaceflight to a near-Earth asteroid or journey to Mars raise serious concerns about long-term effects of space radiation on human health and the availability of suitable therapeutic interventions. At the same time, the need to protect normal tissue from the deleterious effects of radiotherapy has driven considerable research into the design of effective radioprotectors...
November 2017: Life Sciences in Space Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29198308/payload-hardware-and-experimental-protocol-development-to-enable-future-testing-of-the-effect-of-space-microgravity-on-the-resistance-to-gentamicin-of-uropathogenic-escherichia-coli-and-its-%C3%AF-s-deficient-mutant
#5
A C Matin, J-H Wang, Mimi Keyhan, Rachna Singh, Michael Benoit, Macarena P Parra, Michael R Padgen, Antonio J Ricco, Matthew Chin, Charlie R Friedericks, Tori N Chinn, Aaron Cohen, Michael B Henschke, Timothy V Snyder, Matthew P Lera, Shannon S Ross, Christina M Mayberry, Sungshin Choi, Diana T Wu, Ming X Tan, Travis D Boone, Christopher C Beasley, Matthew E Piccini, Stevan M Spremo
Human immune response is compromised and bacteria can become more antibiotic resistant in space microgravity (MG). We report that under low-shear modeled microgravity (LSMMG), stationary-phase uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) become more resistant to gentamicin (Gm), and that this increase is dependent on the presence of σs (a transcription regulator encoded by the rpoS gene). UPEC causes urinary tract infections (UTIs), reported to afflict astronauts; Gm is a standard treatment, so these findings could impact astronaut health...
November 2017: Life Sciences in Space Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29175087/iso-risk-air-no-decompression-limits-after-scoring-marginal-decompression-sickness-cases-as-non-events
#6
F Gregory Murphy, Ashleigh J Swingler, Wayne A Gerth, Laurens E Howle
Decompression sickness (DCS) in humans is associated with reductions in ambient pressure that occur during diving, aviation, or certain manned spaceflight operations. Its signs and symptoms can include, but are not limited to, joint pain, radiating abdominal pain, paresthesia, dyspnea, general malaise, cognitive dysfunction, cardiopulmonary dysfunction, and death. Probabilistic models of DCS allow the probability of DCS incidence and time of occurrence during or after a given hyperbaric or hypobaric exposure to be predicted based on how the gas contents or gas bubble volumes vary in hypothetical tissue compartments during the exposure...
November 15, 2017: Computers in Biology and Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29170507/increased-core-body-temperature-in-astronauts-during-long-duration-space-missions
#7
Alexander C Stahn, Andreas Werner, Oliver Opatz, Martina A Maggioni, Mathias Steinach, Victoria Weller von Ahlefeld, Alan Moore, Brian E Crucian, Scott M Smith, Sara R Zwart, Thomas Schlabs, Stefan Mendt, Tobias Trippel, Eberhard Koralewski, Jochim Koch, Alexander Choukèr, Günther Reitz, Peng Shang, Lothar Röcker, Karl A Kirsch, Hanns-Christian Gunga
Humans' core body temperature (CBT) is strictly controlled within a narrow range. Various studies dealt with the impact of physical activity, clothing, and environmental factors on CBT regulation under terrestrial conditions. However, the effects of weightlessness on human thermoregulation are not well understood. Specifically, studies, investigating the effects of long-duration spaceflight on CBT at rest and during exercise are clearly lacking. We here show that during exercise CBT rises higher and faster in space than on Earth...
November 23, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29167819/successful-amplification-of-dna-aboard-the-international-space-station
#8
Anna-Sophia Boguraev, Holly C Christensen, Ashley R Bonneau, John A Pezza, Nicole M Nichols, Antonio J Giraldez, Michelle M Gray, Brandon M Wagner, Jordan T Aken, Kevin D Foley, D Scott Copeland, Sebastian Kraves, Ezequiel Alvarez Saavedra
As the range and duration of human ventures into space increase, it becomes imperative that we understand the effects of the cosmic environment on astronaut health. Molecular technologies now widely used in research and medicine will need to become available in space to ensure appropriate care of astronauts. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is the gold standard for DNA analysis, yet its potential for use on-orbit remains under-explored. We describe DNA amplification aboard the International Space Station (ISS) through the use of a miniaturized miniPCR system...
2017: NPJ Microgravity
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29161391/an-overview-of-space-medicine
#9
P D Hodkinson, R A Anderton, B N Posselt, K J Fong
Space medicine is fundamental to the human exploration of space. It supports survival, function and performance in this challenging and potentially lethal environment. It is international, intercultural and interdisciplinary, operating at the boundaries of exploration, science, technology and medicine. Space medicine is also the latest UK specialty to be recognized by the Royal College of Physicians in the UK and the General Medical Council. This review introduces the field of space medicine and describes the different types of spaceflight, environmental challenges, associated medical and physiological effects, and operational medical considerations...
December 1, 2017: British Journal of Anaesthesia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29127482/a-single-low-dose-of-fe-ions-can-cause-long-term-biological-responses-in-nl20-human-bronchial-epithelial-cells
#10
Qianlin Cao, Wei Liu, Jingdong Wang, Jianping Cao, Hongying Yang
Space radiation cancer risk may be a potential obstacle for long-duration spaceflight. Among all types of cancer space radiation may induce, lung cancer has been estimated to be the largest potential risk. Although previous animal study has shown that Fe ions, the most important contributor to the total dose equivalent of space radiation, induced a higher incidence of lung tumorigenesis per dose than X-rays, the underlying mechanisms at cellular level remained unclear. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated long-term biological changes in NL20 human bronchial epithelial cells after exposure to Fe ion or X-ray irradiation...
November 10, 2017: Radiation and Environmental Biophysics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29116818/pure-and-oxidized-copper-materials-as-potential-antimicrobial-surfaces-for-spaceflight-activities
#11
C Hahn, M Hans, C Hein, R L Mancinelli, F Mücklich, R Wirth, P Rettberg, C E Hellweg, R Moeller
Microbial biofilms can lead to persistent infections and degrade a variety of materials, and they are notorious for their persistence and resistance to eradication. During long-duration space missions, microbial biofilms present a danger to crew health and spacecraft integrity. The use of antimicrobial surfaces provides an alternative strategy for inhibiting microbial growth and biofilm formation to conventional cleaning procedures and the use of disinfectants. Antimicrobial surfaces contain organic or inorganic compounds, such as antimicrobial peptides or copper and silver, that inhibit microbial growth...
November 8, 2017: Astrobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29054708/semantic-analysis-of-thyroid-cancer-cell-proteins-obtained-from-rare-research-opportunities
#12
Johann Bauer, Daniela Grimm, Erich Gombocz
Research in natural sciences is mainly done by means of experiments. Some of those experiments such as spaceflight-dependent experiments are extremely laborious, complex and expensive. Hence, they often remain rare events with little chances of statistical tests and possibilities of repetition. In order to make each single event as valuable as possible, a sophisticated comparison of experimental data received with the hundreds of millions of computer-stored documents appears necessary. We used results of an earlier study on proteome analysis of microgravity-exposed human thyroid cancer cells, selected twenty proteins which appeared gravity sensitive and investigated whether their change observed in cells under the loss of gravity could cause health problems in astronauts...
October 18, 2017: Journal of Biomedical Informatics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29046178/a-psychiatric-formulary-for-long-duration-spaceflight
#13
Eric Friedman, Brian Bui
Behavioral health is essential for the safety, well-being, and performance of crewmembers in both human spaceflight and Antarctic exploration. Over the past five decades, psychiatric issues have been documented in orbital spaceflight. In Antarctica, literature suggests up to 5% of wintering crewmembers could meet criteria for a psychiatric illness, including mood disorders, stressor-related disorders, sleep-wake disorders, and substance-related disorders. Experience from these settings indicates that psychiatric disorders on deep space missions must be anticipated...
November 1, 2017: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29028400/label-free-study-of-cosmonaut-s-urinary-proteome-changes-after-long-duration-spaceflights
#14
A Brzhozovskiy, A Kononikhin, M Indeykina, LKh Pastushkova, I A Popov, E N Nikolaev, I M Larina
During the entire time that cosmonauts stay on board the international space station, different extreme space flight factors affect their bodies. In order to find out what physiological changes occur under the influence of spaceflight, different parameters of the human body before and after flights are monitored. Analysis of the urine proteome is one of the most perspective non-invasive methods of condition monitoring. The aim of the study was to perform a comparative semi-quantitative label-free urine proteome analysis of samples collected from 21 cosmonauts before and after long-duration spaceflight at the international space station...
August 2017: European Journal of Mass Spectrometry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28962911/from-the-international-space-station-to-the-clinic-how-prolonged-unloading-may-disrupt-lumbar-spine-stability
#15
Jeannie F Bailey, Stephanie L Miller, Kristine Khieu, Conor W O'Neill, Robert M Healey, Dezba G Coughlin, Jojo V Sayson, Douglas G Chang, Alan R Hargens, Jeffrey C Lotz
Background context Prolonged microgravity exposure is associated with localized low back pain and an elevated risk of post-flight disc herniation. Though the mechanisms by which microgravity impairs the spine are unclear, they should be foundational for developing in-flight countermeasures for maintaining astronaut spine health. Because human spine anatomy has adapted to upright posture on Earth, observations of how spaceflight affects the spine should also provide new and potentially important information on spine biomechanics that benefit the general population...
September 26, 2017: Spine Journal: Official Journal of the North American Spine Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28894439/phenotypic-changes-exhibited-by-e-coli-cultured-in-space
#16
Luis Zea, Michael Larsen, Frederico Estante, Klaus Qvortrup, Ralf Moeller, Sílvia Dias de Oliveira, Louis Stodieck, David Klaus
Bacteria will accompany humans in our exploration of space, making it of importance to study their adaptation to the microgravity environment. To investigate potential phenotypic changes for bacteria grown in space, Escherichia coli was cultured onboard the International Space Station with matched controls on Earth. Samples were challenged with different concentrations of gentamicin sulfate to study the role of drug concentration on the dependent variables in the space environment. Analyses included assessments of final cell count, cell size, cell envelope thickness, cell ultrastructure, and culture morphology...
2017: Frontiers in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28854433/cytokine-release-and-focal-adhesion-proteins-in-normal-thyroid-cells-cultured-on-the-random-positioning-machine
#17
Elisabeth Warnke, Jessica Pietsch, Sascha Kopp, Johann Bauer, Jayashree Sahana, Markus Wehland, Marcus Krüger, Ruth Hemmersbach, Manfred Infanger, Ronald Lützenberg, Daniela Grimm
BACKGROUND/AIMS: Spaceflight impacts on the function of the thyroid gland in vivo. In vitro normal and malignant thyrocytes assemble in part to multicellular spheroids (MCS) after exposure to the random positioning machine (RPM), while a number of cells remain adherent (AD). We aim to elucidate possible differences between AD and MCS cells compared to 1g-controls of normal human thyroid cells. METHODS: Cells of the human follicular epithelial thyroid cell line Nthy-ori 3-1 were incubated for up to 72 h on the RPM...
2017: Cellular Physiology and Biochemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28821547/cultivation-in-space-flight-produces-minimal-alterations-in-the-susceptibility-of-bacillus-subtilis-cells-to-72-different-antibiotics-and-growth-inhibiting-compounds
#18
Michael D Morrison, Patricia Fajardo-Cavazos, Wayne L Nicholson
Past results have suggested that bacterial antibiotic susceptibility is altered during space flight. To test this notion, Bacillus subtilis cells were cultivated in matched hardware, medium, and environmental conditions either in spaceflight microgravity on the International Space Station, termed Flight (FL) samples, or at Earth-normal gravity, termed Ground Control (GC) samples. Susceptibility of FL and GC samples was compared to 72 antibiotics and growth-inhibitory compounds using the Omnilog Phenotype Microarray (PM) system...
August 18, 2017: Applied and Environmental Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28811532/protein-expression-changes-caused-by-spaceflight-as-measured-for-18-russian-cosmonauts
#19
Irina M Larina, Andrew J Percy, Juncong Yang, Christoph H Borchers, Andrei M Nosovsky, Anatoli I Grigoriev, Evgeny N Nikolaev
The effects of spaceflight on human physiology is an increasingly studied field, yet the molecular mechanisms driving physiological changes remain unknown. With that in mind, this study was performed to obtain a deeper understanding of changes to the human proteome during space travel, by quantitating a panel of 125 proteins in the blood plasma of 18 Russian cosmonauts who had conducted long-duration missions to the International Space Station. The panel of labeled prototypic tryptic peptides from these proteins covered a concentration range of more than 5 orders of magnitude in human plasma...
August 15, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28798205/cardiac-output-by-pulse-contour-analysis-does-not-match-the-increase-measured-by-rebreathing-during-human-spaceflight
#20
Richard L Hughson, Sean D Peterson, Nicholas J Yee, Danielle K Greaves
Pulse contour analysis of the non-invasive finger arterial pressure waveform provides a convenient means to estimate cardiac output (Q ̇). The method has been compared to standard methods under a range of conditions but never before during spaceflight. We compared pulse contour analysis with the Modelflow algorithm to estimates of Q ̇ obtained by rebreathing during pre-flight baseline testing and during the final month of long-duration spaceflight in nine healthy male astronauts. By Modelflow analysis, stroke volume was greater in supine baseline than seated baseline or inflight...
August 10, 2017: Journal of Applied Physiology
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