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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28632432/serum-micrornas-as-early-indicators-for-estimation-of-exposure-degree-in-response-to-ionizing-irradiation
#1
Wenjun Wei, Jinpeng He, Jufang Wang, Nan Ding, Bing Wang, Sulan Lin, Xurui Zhang, Junrui Hua, He Li, Burong Hu
Exposure to ionizing radiation from nuclear devices, spaceflights or terrorist attacks represents a major threat to human health and public security. After a radiological incident, noninvasive biomarkers that can facilitate rapid assessment of exposure risk in the early stages are urgently needed for optimal medical treatment. Serum microRNAs (miRNAs) are ideal biomarkers because they are stable in response to environmental changes, they are common among different species and are easily collected. Here, we performed miRNA PCR arrays to analyze miRNA expression profiles at 24 h postirradiation...
June 20, 2017: Radiation Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28611153/effects-of-short-term-mild-hypercapnia-during-head-down-tilt-on-intracranial-pressure-and-ocular-structures-in-healthy-human-subjects
#2
Steven S Laurie, Gianmarco Vizzeri, Giovanni Taibbi, Connor R Ferguson, Xiao Hu, Stuart M C Lee, Robert Ploutz-Snyder, Scott M Smith, Sara R Zwart, Michael B Stenger
Many astronauts experience ocular structural and functional changes during long-duration spaceflight, including choroidal folds, optic disc edema, globe flattening, optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) distension, retinal nerve fiber layer thickening, and decreased visual acuity. The leading hypothesis suggests that weightlessness-induced cephalad fluid shifts increase intracranial pressure (ICP), which contributes to the ocular structural changes, but elevated ambient CO2 levels on the International Space Station may also be a factor...
June 2017: Physiological Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28607373/intrinsic-functional-connectivity-reduces-after-first-time-exposure-to-short-term-gravitational-alterations-induced-by-parabolic-flight
#3
Angelique Van Ombergen, Floris L Wuyts, Ben Jeurissen, Jan Sijbers, Floris Vanhevel, Steven Jillings, Paul M Parizel, Stefan Sunaert, Paul H Van de Heyning, Vincent Dousset, Steven Laureys, Athena Demertzi
Spaceflight severely impacts the human body. However, little is known about how gravity and gravitational alterations affect the human brain. Here, we aimed at measuring the effects of acute exposure to gravity transitions. We exposed 28 naïve participants to repetitive alterations between normal, hyper- and microgravity induced by a parabolic flight (PF) and measured functional MRI connectivity changes. Scans were acquired before and after the PF. To mitigate motion sickness, PF participants received scopolamine prior to PF...
June 12, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28561779/transcriptomics-nf-%C3%AE%C2%BAb-pathway-and-their-potential-spaceflight-related-health-consequences
#4
REVIEW
Ye Zhang, Maria Moreno-Villanueva, Stephanie Krieger, Govindarajan T Ramesh, Srujana Neelam, Honglu Wu
In space, living organisms are exposed to multiple stress factors including microgravity and space radiation. For humans, these harmful environmental factors have been known to cause negative health impacts such as bone loss and immune dysfunction. Understanding the mechanisms by which spaceflight impacts human health at the molecular level is critical not only for accurately assessing the risks associated with spaceflight, but also for developing effective countermeasures. Over the years, a number of studies have been conducted under real or simulated space conditions...
May 31, 2017: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28554506/bion-m-1-first-continuous-blood-pressure-monitoring-in-mice-during-a-30-day-spaceflight
#5
Alexander Andreev-Andrievskiy, Anfisa Popova, Jean-Christophe Lloret, Patrick Aubry, Anatoliy Borovik, Daria Tsvirkun, Olga Vinogradova, Eugeniy Ilyin, Guillemette Gauquelin-Koch, Claude Gharib, Marc-Antoine Custaud
Animals are an essential component of space exploration and have been used to demonstrate that weightlessness does not disrupt essential physiological functions. They can also contribute to space research as models of weightlessness-induced changes in humans. Animal research was an integral component of the 30-day automated Russian biosatellite Bion-M 1 space mission. The aim of the hemodynamic experiment was to estimate cardiovascular function in mice, a species roughly 3000 times smaller than humans, during prolonged spaceflight and post-flight recovery, particularly, to investigate if mice display signs of cardiovascular deconditioning...
May 2017: Life Sciences in Space Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28539156/early-human-factors-studies-for-spaceflight-at-the-aeromedical-field-laboratory-at-holloman-air-force-base
#6
Loretta Hall
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 1, 2017: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28533143/drugs-in-space-pharmacokinetics-and-pharmacodynamics-in-astronauts
#7
REVIEW
Johannes Kast, Yichao Yu, Christoph N Seubert, Virginia E Wotring, Hartmut Derendorf
Space agencies are working intensely to push the current boundaries of human spaceflight by sending astronauts deeper into space than ever before, including missions to Mars and asteroids. Spaceflight alters human physiology due to fluid shifts, muscle and bone loss, immune system dysregulation, and changes in the gastrointestinal tract and metabolic enzymes. These alterations may change the pharmacokinetics and/or pharmacodynamics of medications used by astronauts and subsequently might impact drug efficacy and safety...
May 19, 2017: European Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28492348/culture-of-human-cells-in-experimental-units-for-spaceflight-impacts-on-their-behavior
#8
Alessandra Cazzaniga, Claudia Moscheni, Jeanette Am Maier, Sara Castiglioni
Because space missions produce pathophysiological alterations such as cardiovascular disorders and bone demineralization which are very common on Earth, biomedical research in space is a frontier that holds important promises not only to counterbalance space-associated disorders in astronauts but also to ameliorate the health of Earth-bound population. Experiments in space are complex to design. Cells must be cultured in closed cell culture systems (from now defined experimental units (EUs)), which are biocompatible, functional, safe to minimize any potential hazard to the crew, and with a high degree of automation...
May 2017: Experimental Biology and Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28491008/decision-support-system-requirements-definition-for-human-extravehicular-activity-based-on-cognitive-work-analysis
#9
Matthew James Miller, Kerry M McGuire, Karen M Feigh
The design and adoption of decision support systems within complex work domains is a challenge for cognitive systems engineering (CSE) practitioners, particularly at the onset of project development. This article presents an example of applying CSE techniques to derive design requirements compatible with traditional systems engineering to guide decision support system development. Specifically, it demonstrates the requirements derivation process based on cognitive work analysis for a subset of human spaceflight operations known as extravehicular activity...
June 2017: Journal of Cognitive Engineering and Decision Making
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28490676/excretion-of-zinc-and-copper-increases-in-men-during-3-weeks-of-bed-rest-with-or-without-artificial-gravity
#10
Hayley N Heacox, Patricia L Gillman, Sara R Zwart, Scott M Smith
Background: Zinc and copper have many physiologic functions and little or no functional storage capability, so persistent losses of either element present health concerns, especially during extended-duration space missions.Objectives: We evaluated the effects of short-term bed rest (BR), a spaceflight analog, on copper and zinc metabolism to better understand the role of these nutrients in human adaptation to (simulated) spaceflight. We also investigated the effect of artificial gravity on copper and zinc homeostasis...
June 2017: Journal of Nutrition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28324673/a-framework-to-guide-the-assessment-of-human-machine-systems
#11
Kimberly Stowers, James Oglesby, Shirley Sonesh, Kevin Leyva, Chelsea Iwig, Eduardo Salas
OBJECTIVE: We have developed a framework for guiding measurement in human-machine systems. BACKGROUND: The assessment of safety and performance in human-machine systems often relies on direct measurement, such as tracking reaction time and accidents. However, safety and performance emerge from the combination of several variables. The assessment of precursors to safety and performance are thus an important part of predicting and improving outcomes in human-machine systems...
March 2017: Human Factors
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28279266/parallels-between-astronauts-and-terrestrial-patients-taking-physiotherapy-rehabilitation-to-infinity-and-beyond
#12
Julie Hides, Gunda Lambrecht, Gita Ramdharry, Rebecca Cusack, Jacob Bloomberg, Maria Stokes
Exposure to the microgravity environment induces physiological changes in the cardiovascular, musculoskeletal and sensorimotor systems in healthy astronauts. As space agencies prepare for extended duration missions, it is difficult to predict the extent of the effects that prolonged exposure to microgravity will have on astronauts. Prolonged bed rest is a model used by space agencies to simulate the effects of spaceflight on the human body, and bed rest studies have provided some insights into the effects of immobilisation and inactivity...
January 2017: Musculoskeletal Science & Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28271409/the-effect-of-spaceflight-and-microgravity-on-the-human-brain
#13
Angelique Van Ombergen, Athena Demertzi, Elena Tomilovskaya, Ben Jeurissen, Jan Sijbers, Inessa B Kozlovskaya, Paul M Parizel, Paul H Van de Heyning, Stefan Sunaert, Steven Laureys, Floris L Wuyts
Microgravity, confinement, isolation, and immobilization are just some of the features astronauts have to cope with during space missions. Consequently, long-duration space travel can have detrimental effects on human physiology. Although research has focused on the cardiovascular and musculoskeletal system in particular, the exact impact of spaceflight on the human central nervous system remains to be determined. Previous studies have reported psychological problems, cephalic fluid shifts, neurovestibular problems, and cognitive alterations, but there is paucity in the knowledge of the underlying neural substrates...
March 7, 2017: Journal of Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28248986/cellular-responses-and-gene-expression-profile-changes-due-to-bleomycin-induced-dna-damage-in-human-fibroblasts-in-space
#14
Tao Lu, Ye Zhang, Yared Kidane, Alan Feiveson, Louis Stodieck, Fathi Karouia, Govindarajan Ramesh, Larry Rohde, Honglu Wu
Living organisms in space are constantly exposed to radiation, toxic chemicals or reactive oxygen species generated due to increased levels of environmental and psychological stresses. Understanding the impact of spaceflight factors, microgravity in particular, on cellular responses to DNA damage is essential for assessing the radiation risk for astronauts and the mutation rate in microorganisms. In a study conducted on the International Space Station, confluent human fibroblasts in culture were treated with bleomycin for three hours in the true microgravity environment...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28173930/methodology-for-astronaut-reconditioning-research
#15
David J Beard, Jonathan A Cook
Space medicine offers some unique challenges, especially in terms of research methodology. A specific challenge for astronaut reconditioning involves identification of what aspects of terrestrial research methodology hold and which require modification. This paper reviews this area and presents appropriate solutions where possible. It is concluded that spaceflight rehabilitation research should remain question/problem driven and is broadly similar to the terrestrial equivalent on small populations, such as rare diseases and various sports...
January 2017: Musculoskeletal Science & Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28173928/the-role-of-physiotherapy-in-the-european-space-agency-strategy-for-preparation-and-reconditioning-of-astronauts-before-and-after-long-duration-space-flight
#16
Gunda Lambrecht, Nora Petersen, Guillaume Weerts, Casey Pruett, Simon Evetts, Maria Stokes, Julie Hides
Spaceflight and exposure to microgravity have wide-ranging effects on many systems of the human body. At the European Space Agency (ESA), a physiotherapist plays a key role in the multidisciplinary ESA team responsible for astronaut health, with a focus on the neuro-musculoskeletal system. In conjunction with a sports scientist, the physiotherapist prepares the astronaut for spaceflight, monitors their exercise performance whilst on the International Space Station (ISS), and reconditions the astronaut when they return to Earth...
January 2017: Musculoskeletal Science & Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28092926/effect-of-gravity-and-microgravity-on-intracranial-pressure
#17
Justin S Lawley, Lonnie G Petersen, Erin J Howden, Satyam Sarma, William K Cornwell, Rong Zhang, Louis A Whitworth, Michael A Williams, Benjamin D Levine
KEY POINTS: Astronauts have recently been discovered to have impaired vision, with a presentation that resembles syndromes of elevated intracranial pressure on Earth. Gravity has a profound effect on fluid distribution and pressure within the human circulation. In contrast to prevailing theory, we observed that microgravity reduces central venous and intracranial pressure. This being said, intracranial pressure is not reduced to the levels observed in the 90 deg seated upright posture on Earth...
March 15, 2017: Journal of Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28088539/the-dna-damage-response-of-c-elegans-affected-by-gravity-sensing-and-radiosensitivity-during-the-shenzhou-8-spaceflight
#18
Ying Gao, Dan Xu, Lei Zhao, Yeqing Sun
Space radiation and microgravity are recognized as primary and inevitable risk factors for humans traveling in space, but the reports regarding their synergistic effects remain inconclusive and vary across studies due to differences in the environmental conditions and intrinsic biological sensitivity. Thus, we studied the synergistic effects on transcriptional changes in the global genome and DNA damage response (DDR) by using dys-1 mutant and ced-1 mutant of C. elegans, which respectively presented microgravity-insensitivity and radiosensitivity when exposure to spaceflight condition (SF) and space radiation (SR)...
January 2017: Mutation Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28087888/simulated-microgravity-decreases-circulating-iron-in-rats-role-of-inflammation-induced-hepcidin-upregulation
#19
Thibault Cavey, Nicolas Pierre, Kévin Nay, Coralie Allain, Martine Ropert, Olivier Loréal, Frédéric Derbré
During spaceflight, humans exposed to microgravity exhibit an increase of iron storage and a reduction of circulating iron. Such perturbations could promote oxidative stress and anemia in astronauts. The mechanism by which microgravity modulates iron metabolism is still unknown. Herein, we hypothesized that microgravity up-regulates hepcidin, a hormone produced by the liver that is the main controller of iron homeostasis. To test this hypothesis, rats were submitted to hindlimb unloading (HU), the reference model to mimic the effects of microgravity in rodents...
January 13, 2017: Experimental Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28076365/gene-expression-profiling-in-slow-type-calf-soleus-muscle-of-30-days-space-flown-mice
#20
Guido Gambara, Michele Salanova, Stefano Ciciliot, Sandra Furlan, Martina Gutsmann, Gudrun Schiffl, Ute Ungethuem, Pompeo Volpe, Hanns-Christian Gunga, Dieter Blottner
Microgravity exposure as well as chronic disuse are two main causes of skeletal muscle atrophy in animals and humans. The antigravity calf soleus is a reference postural muscle to investigate the mechanism of disuse-induced maladaptation and plasticity of human and rodent (rats or mice) skeletal musculature. Here, we report microgravity-induced global gene expression changes in space-flown mouse skeletal muscle and the identification of yet unknown disuse susceptible transcripts found in soleus (a mainly slow phenotype) but not in extensor digitorum longus (a mainly fast phenotype dorsiflexor as functional counterpart to soleus)...
2017: PloS One
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