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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28811532/protein-expression-changes-caused-by-spaceflight-as-measured-for-18-russian-cosmonauts
#1
Irina M Larina, Andrew J Percy, Juncong Yang, Christoph H Borchers, Andrei M Nosovsky, Anatoli I Grigoriev, Evgeny N Nikolaev
The effects of spaceflight on human physiology is an increasingly studied field, yet the molecular mechanisms driving physiological changes remain unknown. With that in mind, this study was performed to obtain a deeper understanding of changes to the human proteome during space travel, by quantitating a panel of 125 proteins in the blood plasma of 18 Russian cosmonauts who had conducted long-duration missions to the International Space Station. The panel of labeled prototypic tryptic peptides from these proteins covered a concentration range of more than 5 orders of magnitude in human plasma...
August 15, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28798205/cardiac-output-by-pulse-contour-analysis-does-not-match-the-increase-measured-by-rebreathing-during-human-spaceflight
#2
Richard L Hughson, Sean D Peterson, Nicholas J Yee, Danielle K Greaves
Pulse contour analysis of the non-invasive finger arterial pressure waveform provides a convenient means to estimate cardiac output (Q ̇). The method has been compared to standard methods under a range of conditions but never before during spaceflight. We compared pulse contour analysis with the Modelflow algorithm to estimates of Q ̇ obtained by rebreathing during pre-flight baseline testing and during the final month of long-duration spaceflight in nine healthy male astronauts. By Modelflow analysis, stroke volume was greater in supine baseline than seated baseline or inflight...
August 10, 2017: Journal of Applied Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28760005/evidence-based-selection-of-probiotic-strains-to-promote-astronaut-health-or-alleviate-symptoms-of-illness-on-long-duration-spaceflight-missions
#3
G L Douglas, A A Voorhies
Spaceflight impacts multiple aspects of human physiology, which will require non-invasive countermeasures as mission length and distance from Earth increases and the capability for external medical intervention decreases. Studies on Earth have shown that probiotics have the potential to improve some of the conditions that have manifested during spaceflight, such as gastrointestinal distress, dermatitis, and respiratory infections. The constraints and risks of spaceflight make it imperative that probiotics are carefully selected based on their strain-specific benefits, doses, delivery mechanisms, and relevance to likely crew conditions prior to evaluation in astronauts...
August 1, 2017: Beneficial Microbes
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28727291/proteomic-analysis-and-bioluminescent-reporter-gene-assays-to-investigate-effects-of-simulated-microgravity-on-caco-2-cells
#4
Giorgia La Barbera, Anna Laura Capriotti, Elisa Michelini, Susy Piovesana, Maria Maddalena Calabretta, Riccardo Zenezini Chiozzi, Aldo Roda, Aldo Laganà
Microgravity is one of the most important features in spaceflight. Previous evidence from in-vitro studies has shown that significant changes occur under simulated microgravity. For this reason, human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells were selected as cell model of intestinal epithelial barrier and their response to altered gravity conditions was investigated, especially on the protein level. In this study, we combined label-free shotgun proteomics and bioluminescent reporter gene assays to identify key proteins and pathways involved in the response of Caco-2 cells under reference and microgravity conditions...
July 20, 2017: Proteomics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28720191/sustained-accelerated-idioventricular-rhythm-in-a-centrifuge-simulated-suborbital-spaceflight
#5
Rahul Suresh, Rebecca S Blue, Charles Mathers, Tarah L Castleberry, James M Vanderploeg
INTRODUCTION: Hypergravitational exposures during human centrifugation are known to provoke dysrhythmias, including sinus dysrhythmias/tachycardias, premature atrial/ventricular contractions, and even atrial fibrillations or flutter patterns. However, events are generally short-lived and resolve rapidly after cessation of acceleration. This case report describes a prolonged ectopic ventricular rhythm in response to high G exposure. CASE REPORT: A previously healthy 30-yr-old man voluntarily participated in centrifuge trials as a part of a larger study, experiencing a total of 7 centrifuge runs over 48 h...
August 1, 2017: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28720184/human-performance-time-model-of-spacecraft-control-panel-operation-in-simulated-microgravity
#6
Shi Cao, Yijing Zhang, Yunhuan Guo, Shanguang Chen
BACKGROUND: Human performance modeling plays an important role in the design and management of human spaceflight missions. Previous studies reported that manual control task time increased in microgravity conditions. The current study aimed to find a modeling method that can quantify and predict the task time of spacecraft control panel operation in the simulated microgravity condition. METHODS: We proposed the application of a predetermined elemental task method together with an information processing time model to quantify both physical motion time and cognitive time...
August 1, 2017: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28705994/wearable-brain-imaging-with-multi-modal-physiological-recording
#7
Gary E Strangman, Vladimir Ivkovic, Quan Zhang
The brain is a central component of cognitive and physical human performance. Measures including functional brain activation, cerebral perfusion, cerebral oxygenation, evoked electrical responses, and resting hemodynamic and electrical activity are all related to, or can predict health status or performance decrements. However, measuring brain physiology typically requires large, stationary machines that are not suitable for mobile or self-monitoring. Moreover, when individuals are ambulatory, systemic physiological fluctuations-e...
July 13, 2017: Journal of Applied Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28683078/simulated-space-radiation-induced-mutants-in-the-mouse-kidney-display-widespread-genomic-change
#8
Mitchell S Turker, Dmytro Grygoryev, Michael Lasarev, Anna Ohlrich, Furaha A Rwatambuga, Sorrel Johnson, Cristian Dan, Bradley Eckelmann, Gwen Hryciw, Jian-Hua Mao, Antoine M Snijders, Stacey Gauny, Amy Kronenberg
Exposure to a small number of high-energy heavy charged particles (HZE ions), as found in the deep space environment, could significantly affect astronaut health following prolonged periods of space travel if these ions induce mutations and related cancers. In this study, we used an in vivo mutagenesis assay to define the mutagenic effects of accelerated 56Fe ions (1 GeV/amu, 151 keV/μm) in the mouse kidney epithelium exposed to doses ranging from 0.25 to 2.0 Gy. These doses represent fluences ranging from 1 to 8 particle traversals per cell nucleus...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28649638/a-cubesat-centrifuge-for-long-duration-milligravity-research
#9
REVIEW
Erik Asphaug, Jekan Thangavelautham, Andrew Klesh, Aman Chandra, Ravi Nallapu, Laksh Raura, Mercedes Herreras-Martinez, Stephen Schwartz
We advocate a low-cost strategy for long-duration research into the 'milligravity' environment of asteroids, comets and small moons, where surface gravity is a vector field typically less than 1/1000 the gravity of Earth. Unlike the microgravity environment of space, there is a directionality that gives rise, over time, to strangely familiar geologic textures and landforms. In addition to advancing planetary science, and furthering technologies for hazardous asteroid mitigation and in situ resource utilization, simplified access to long-duration milligravity offers significant potential for advancing human spaceflight, biomedicine and manufacturing...
2017: NPJ Microgravity
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28649636/interplay-of-space-radiation-and-microgravity-in-dna-damage-and-dna-damage-response
#10
María Moreno-Villanueva, Michael Wong, Tao Lu, Ye Zhang, Honglu Wu
In space, multiple unique environmental factors, particularly microgravity and space radiation, pose constant threat to the DNA integrity of living organisms. Specifically, space radiation can cause damage to DNA directly, through the interaction of charged particles with the DNA molecules themselves, or indirectly through the production of free radicals. Although organisms have evolved strategies on Earth to confront such damage, space environmental conditions, especially microgravity, can impact DNA repair resulting in accumulation of severe DNA lesions...
2017: NPJ Microgravity
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28649633/latent-virus-reactivation-in-astronauts-on-the-international-space-station
#11
Satish K Mehta, Mark L Laudenslager, Raymond P Stowe, Brian E Crucian, Alan H Feiveson, Clarence F Sams, Duane L Pierson
Reactivation of latent herpes viruses was measured in 23 astronauts (18 male and 5 female) before, during, and after long-duration (up to 180 days) spaceflight onboard the international space station . Twenty age-matched and sex-matched healthy ground-based subjects were included as a control group. Blood, urine, and saliva samples were collected before, during, and after spaceflight. Saliva was analyzed for Epstein-Barr virus, varicella-zoster virus, and herpes simplex virus type 1. Urine was analyzed for cytomegalovirus...
2017: NPJ Microgravity
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28649630/towards-human-exploration-of-space-the-theseus-review-series-on-muscle-and-bone-research-priorities
#12
Thomas Lang, Jack J W A Van Loon, Susan Bloomfield, Laurence Vico, Angele Chopard, Joern Rittweger, Antonios Kyparos, Dieter Blottner, Ilkka Vuori, Rupert Gerzer, Peter R Cavanagh
Without effective countermeasures, the musculoskeletal system is altered by the microgravity environment of long-duration spaceflight, resulting in atrophy of bone and muscle tissue, as well as in deficits in the function of cartilage, tendons, and vertebral disks. While inflight countermeasures implemented on the International Space Station have evidenced reduction of bone and muscle loss on low-Earth orbit missions of several months in length, important knowledge gaps must be addressed in order to develop effective strategies for managing human musculoskeletal health on exploration class missions well beyond Earth orbit...
2017: NPJ Microgravity
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28649627/from-the-bench-to-exploration-medicine-nasa-life-sciences-translational-research-for-human-exploration-and-habitation-missions
#13
Joshua S Alwood, April E Ronca, Richard C Mains, Mark J Shelhamer, Jeffrey D Smith, Thomas J Goodwin
NASA's Space Biology and Human Research Program entities have recently spearheaded communications both internally and externally to coordinate the agency's translational research efforts. In this paper, we strongly advocate for translational research at NASA, provide recent examples of NASA sponsored early-stage translational research, and discuss options for a path forward. Our overall objective is to help in stimulating a collaborative research across multiple disciplines and entities that, working together, will more effectively and more rapidly achieve NASA's goals for human spaceflight...
2017: NPJ Microgravity
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28649624/spaceflight-induced-neuroplasticity-in-humans-as-measured-by-mri-what-do-we-know-so-far
#14
Angelique Van Ombergen, Steven Laureys, Stefan Sunaert, Elena Tomilovskaya, Paul M Parizel, Floris L Wuyts
Space travel poses an enormous challenge on the human body; microgravity, ionizing radiation, absence of circadian rhythm, confinement and isolation are just some of the features associated with it. Obviously, all of the latter can have an impact on human physiology and even induce detrimental changes. Some organ systems have been studied thoroughly under space conditions, however, not much is known on the functional and morphological effects of spaceflight on the human central nervous system. Previous studies have already shown that central nervous system changes occur during and after spaceflight in the form of neurovestibular problems, alterations in cognitive function and sensory perception, cephalic fluid shifts and psychological disturbances...
2017: NPJ Microgravity
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28632432/serum-micrornas-as-early-indicators-for-estimation-of-exposure-degree-in-response-to-ionizing-irradiation
#15
Wenjun Wei, Jinpeng He, Jufang Wang, Nan Ding, Bing Wang, Sulan Lin, Xurui Zhang, Junrui Hua, He Li, Burong Hu
Exposure to ionizing radiation from nuclear devices, spaceflights or terrorist attacks represents a major threat to human health and public security. After a radiological incident, noninvasive biomarkers that can facilitate rapid assessment of exposure risk in the early stages are urgently needed for optimal medical treatment. Serum microRNAs (miRNAs) are ideal biomarkers because they are stable in response to environmental changes, they are common among different species and are easily collected. Here, we performed miRNA PCR arrays to analyze miRNA expression profiles at 24 h postirradiation...
June 20, 2017: Radiation Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28611153/effects-of-short-term-mild-hypercapnia-during-head-down-tilt-on-intracranial-pressure-and-ocular-structures-in-healthy-human-subjects
#16
Steven S Laurie, Gianmarco Vizzeri, Giovanni Taibbi, Connor R Ferguson, Xiao Hu, Stuart M C Lee, Robert Ploutz-Snyder, Scott M Smith, Sara R Zwart, Michael B Stenger
Many astronauts experience ocular structural and functional changes during long-duration spaceflight, including choroidal folds, optic disc edema, globe flattening, optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) distension, retinal nerve fiber layer thickening, and decreased visual acuity. The leading hypothesis suggests that weightlessness-induced cephalad fluid shifts increase intracranial pressure (ICP), which contributes to the ocular structural changes, but elevated ambient CO2 levels on the International Space Station may also be a factor...
June 2017: Physiological Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28607373/intrinsic-functional-connectivity-reduces-after-first-time-exposure-to-short-term-gravitational-alterations-induced-by-parabolic-flight
#17
Angelique Van Ombergen, Floris L Wuyts, Ben Jeurissen, Jan Sijbers, Floris Vanhevel, Steven Jillings, Paul M Parizel, Stefan Sunaert, Paul H Van de Heyning, Vincent Dousset, Steven Laureys, Athena Demertzi
Spaceflight severely impacts the human body. However, little is known about how gravity and gravitational alterations affect the human brain. Here, we aimed at measuring the effects of acute exposure to gravity transitions. We exposed 28 naïve participants to repetitive alterations between normal, hyper- and microgravity induced by a parabolic flight (PF) and measured functional MRI connectivity changes. Scans were acquired before and after the PF. To mitigate motion sickness, PF participants received scopolamine prior to PF...
June 12, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28561779/transcriptomics-nf-%C3%AE%C2%BAb-pathway-and-their-potential-spaceflight-related-health-consequences
#18
REVIEW
Ye Zhang, Maria Moreno-Villanueva, Stephanie Krieger, Govindarajan T Ramesh, Srujana Neelam, Honglu Wu
In space, living organisms are exposed to multiple stress factors including microgravity and space radiation. For humans, these harmful environmental factors have been known to cause negative health impacts such as bone loss and immune dysfunction. Understanding the mechanisms by which spaceflight impacts human health at the molecular level is critical not only for accurately assessing the risks associated with spaceflight, but also for developing effective countermeasures. Over the years, a number of studies have been conducted under real or simulated space conditions...
May 31, 2017: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28554506/bion-m-1-first-continuous-blood-pressure-monitoring-in-mice-during-a-30-day-spaceflight
#19
Alexander Andreev-Andrievskiy, Anfisa Popova, Jean-Christophe Lloret, Patrick Aubry, Anatoliy Borovik, Daria Tsvirkun, Olga Vinogradova, Eugeniy Ilyin, Guillemette Gauquelin-Koch, Claude Gharib, Marc-Antoine Custaud
Animals are an essential component of space exploration and have been used to demonstrate that weightlessness does not disrupt essential physiological functions. They can also contribute to space research as models of weightlessness-induced changes in humans. Animal research was an integral component of the 30-day automated Russian biosatellite Bion-M 1 space mission. The aim of the hemodynamic experiment was to estimate cardiovascular function in mice, a species roughly 3000 times smaller than humans, during prolonged spaceflight and post-flight recovery, particularly, to investigate if mice display signs of cardiovascular deconditioning...
May 2017: Life Sciences in Space Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28539156/early-human-factors-studies-for-spaceflight-at-the-aeromedical-field-laboratory-at-holloman-air-force-base
#20
Loretta Hall
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 1, 2017: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
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