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Mind body medicine

Adam S Cheifetz, Robert Gianotti, Raphael Luber, Peter R Gibson
Patients and physicians often have many questions regarding the role of complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs), or non-allopathic therapies, for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). CAMs of various forms are used by more than half of patients with IBD during some point in their disease course. We summarize the available evidence for the most commonly used and discussed CAMs. We discuss evidence for the effects of herbs (such as cannabis and curcumin), probiotics, acupuncture, exercise, and mind-body therapy...
October 12, 2016: Gastroenterology
Christina M Luberto, Emma Chad-Friedman, Michelle L Dossett, Giselle K Perez, Elyse R Park
Mind-body interventions can improve vulnerabilities that underlie smoking behavior. The characteristics of smokers who use mind-body medicine have not been explored, preventing the development of targeted interventions. Patients (N = 593) presenting to a mind-body medicine clinic completed self-report measures. Patients were 67 percent never smokers, 27 percent former smokers, and 6 percent current smokers. Current smokers were younger; more likely to be single, unemployed, or on disability; and report greater depression symptoms, greater pain, and lower social support (ps < ...
September 29, 2016: Journal of Health Psychology
Maria Grazia Spurio
For a long time, terms like "mind" and "emotion" have rarely been taken into account, not even mentioned in the medical texts. The latest scientific researches, including the studies of Candace Pert, on the contrary, have emphasized that the entire body thinks, because every single cell hears, and feels emotions. The international researcher has discovered the endocrines and a vast number of neuropeptides, that work as an "information network" that interconnects the entire body, the "psychic" molecules are transmitted and travel, communicating information as in a circular and recursive body - mind mechanism...
September 2016: Psychiatria Danubina
Natalie E Kelso-Chichetto, Chukwuemeka N Okafor, Jeffrey S Harman, Shantrel S Canidate, Christa L Cook, Robert L Cook
OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to describe complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use and to assess the relationships between CAM use and antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA viral load suppression among a sample of persons living with HIV (PLWH) engaged in care in the state of Florida. DESIGN: The Florida Medical Monitoring Project (n = 803) collected repeated cross-sectional data for surveillance of clinical outcomes among PLWH from 2009 to 2010...
September 15, 2016: Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine: Research on Paradigm, Practice, and Policy
Gyu-Min Yeon, Sang Ook Nam
Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is a phrase used to describe additional health care methods such as mind/body practices and natural products not regarded as treatments by conventional medicine. The use of CAM in children with common neurologic diseases is more frequent than its use in healthy children (24%-78% vs. 12%). However, less than half of patients report such use to their physicians. The preferred modalities of CAM vary in different countries due to their different cultures and traditions...
August 2016: Korean Journal of Pediatrics
Joel S Brenner
Sports specialization is becoming the norm in youth sports for a variety of reasons. When sports specialization occurs too early, detrimental effects may occur, both physically and psychologically. If the timing is correct and sports specialization is performed under the correct conditions, the athlete may be successful in reaching specific goals. Young athletes who train intensively, whether specialized or not, can also be at risk of adverse effects on the mind and body. The purpose of this clinical report is to assist pediatricians in counseling their young athlete patients and their parents regarding sports specialization and intensive training...
September 2016: Pediatrics
(no author information available yet)
Mind-body therapies are popular and are ranked among the top 10 complementary and integrative medicine practices reportedly used by adults and children in the 2007-2012 National Health Interview Survey. A growing body of evidence supports the effectiveness and safety of mind-body therapies in pediatrics. This clinical report outlines popular mind-body therapies for children and youth and examines the best-available evidence for a variety of mind-body therapies and practices, including biofeedback, clinical hypnosis, guided imagery, meditation, and yoga...
September 2016: Pediatrics
Taryn Jade Lores, Miriam Henke, Anna Chur-Hansen
Context • Interest has been rising in the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for the promotion of health and treatment of disease. To date, the majority of CAM research has focused on exploring the demographic characteristics, attitudes, and motivations of CAM users and on the efficacy of different therapies and products. Less is known with respect to the psychological characteristics of people who use CAM. Previous research has not investigated the usefulness of integrating mind-body therapies with natural products in a combined mood intervention...
2016: Advances in Mind-body Medicine
Meharban Singh
Pediatrics is a dynamic discipline and there is awareness and hope for actualizing outstanding achievements in the field of child health in 21(st) century and beyond. Improved lifestyle and quality of children's health is likely to reduce the burden of adult diseases and enhance longevity because seeds of most adult diseases are sown in childhood. Identification and decoding of human genome is expected to revolutionize the practice of pediatrics. The day is not far off when a patient will walk into doctor's chamber with an electronic or digital health history on a CD or palmtop and a decoded genomic constitution...
August 10, 2016: Indian Journal of Pediatrics
Kazim Emre Karasahin, Ulas Fidan, Ferdi Kinci, Serkan Bodur
We have recently read the paper by Fisher et al. (1), evaluating the complementary and alternative medicine use by women with cyclic perimenstrual pain and discomfort. In their review, the authors have reported that cyclic perimenstrual pain and discomfort was widely experienced by women across the cultures, and that the papers they reviewed clearly showed women used complementary and alternative medicine to treat a wide range of cyclic perimenstrual pain and discomfort. We were surprised to see that although they have mentioned almost all of the popular complementary and alternative medical approaches througout the world, such as vitamin/mineral supplements, evening primrose oil, herbal teas, acupuncture, massage, mind body therapies, yoga, meditation etc...
August 8, 2016: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica
A Avantaggiato, G Bertuzzi, T Addonisio, G Iannucci, U Vitiello, F Carinci
Among non-ablative procedures in aesthetic medicine, the radiofrequency (RF) is one of the most popular for the treatment of face and body skin laxity. It can be classified as a physical bio-stimulation that produces a temperature increase on biological structures, using electromagnetic waves. The term encompasses devices having substantial differences in energy, wavelengths, handpieces dimension and structure. Moreover, for some of these, the protocols are only partially defined. The aim of this short review is to clarify some aspecst of the RF therapy starting from the physics, passing through the mechanism of action and finally, with the most suitable protocols...
April 2016: Journal of Biological Regulators and Homeostatic Agents
Jennifer Mongiovi, Zaixing Shi, Heather Greenlee
BACKGROUND: It is estimated that over half of the adult U.S. population currently has one or more chronic conditions, resulting in up to an estimated $1,600 in productivity loss annually for each employee with chronic disease. Previous studies have suggested that integrating alternative or complementary health approaches with conventional medicine may be beneficial for managing the symptoms, lifestyle changes, treatment, physical and psychosocial consequences that result from chronic illness...
2016: BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Patricia L Judson, Reem Abdallah, Yin Xiong, Judith Ebbert, Johnathan M Lancaster
PURPOSE: To define the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in individuals presenting for care at a comprehensive cancer center. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 17 639 individuals presenting to an NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center (and consortium sites) completed a questionnaire regarding CAM use. Data were analyzed using the univariate χ(2) test to assess CAM use associated with a number of variables, including cancer status, age, gender, marital status, ethnicity, race, employment, and education level...
July 21, 2016: Integrative Cancer Therapies
Ausanee Wanchai, Duangjai Phrompayak
OBJECTIVE: Patients with diabetes commonly use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Little is known about types and factors related to CAM use in patients with diabetes in Thailand. This study aimed to examine types and factors that were associated with CAM use in Thai diabetic patients. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of diabetic patients being treated in four primary healthcare units and two secondary hospitals in the north of Thailand was conducted...
July 2016: Journal of Integrative Medicine
Kritika Subramanian, Inuka Midha
Objective. A cross-cultural comparative study was developed that surveyed university students in Atlanta (United States), New Delhi (India), and Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom) to understand the prevalence and perspectives of CAM in three urban societies with different healthcare systems. Design. Surveys were sent to students in the three aforementioned cities. Survey distribution occurred over 6 months from May to November 2015. A total of 314 surveys were received. Results. Dietary and vitamin supplements had the highest prevalence collectively (n = 203), followed by meditation, yoga, and massage...
2016: International Scholarly Research Notices
Allen K Chen, Anagha Kumar, Aviad Haramati
INTRODUCTION: Empathy among medical practitioners has been shown to affect patient care and outcomes. Factors such as stress and depression are known to have a negative impact on medical student empathy. Approaches such as mindfulness, meditation, and other mind-body techniques can enhance empathy and reverse burnout symptoms. In the present study, we evaluated impact of Mind Body Medicine (MBM) course on perceived stress and empathy on first-year medical students. METHODS: Thirteen first-year medical students in total self-selected into MBM (experimental) and seven non-MBM (control) groups completed a prospective, pre- and post-test analysis, using the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy - Students (JSPE-S), Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), and Personal Health Questionnaire (PHQ) to evaluate empathy, stress, and depression, respectively...
2016: Medical Education Online
Paul J Mills, Kathleen L Wilson, Meredith A Pung, Lizabeth Weiss, Sheila Patel, P Murali Doraiswamy, Christine Peterson, Valencia Porter, Eric Schadt, Deepak Chopra, Rudolph E Tanzi
OBJECTIVE: To examine the effects of a comprehensive residential mind-body program on well-being. DESIGN: The Self-Directed Biological Transformation Initiative was a quasi-randomized trial comparing the effects of participation in a 6-day Ayurvedic system of medicine-based comprehensive residential program with a 6-day residential vacation at the same retreat location. SETTING: Retreat setting. PARTICIPANTS: 69 healthy women (n = 58) and men (n = 11) (mean age ± standard deviation, 53...
August 2016: Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine: Research on Paradigm, Practice, and Policy
Andrzej Nowak, Elżbieta Czkwianianc
Recently, a lot of factors and mechanisms regulating body mass have been discovered, although there are still many unknowns. Their effect on the development of many diseases related to nutritional disorders (obesity, anorexia, celiac disease, inflammatory bowel disease) means that the understanding of these mechanisms will make it possible to determine new therapeutic goals and create new medicinal products. This is even more important because nowadays there is no effective medication to cure nutritional disorders...
2016: Przegla̜d Gastroenterologiczny
Shirley P C Ngai, Alice Y M Jones, Wilson Wai San Tam
BACKGROUND: Tai Chi, a systematic callisthenic exercise first developed in ancient China, involves a series of slow and rhythmic circular motions. It emphasises use of 'mind' or concentration to control breathing and circular body motions to facilitate flow of internal energy (i.e. 'qi') within the body. Normal flow of 'qi' is believed to be essential to sustain body homeostasis, ultimately leading to longevity. The effect of Tai Chi on balance and muscle strength in the elderly population has been reported; however, the effect of Tai Chi on dyspnoea, exercise capacity, pulmonary function and psychosocial status among people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) remains unclear...
2016: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
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