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Intestinal barrier

Yanling Wei, Jun Yang, Jun Wang, Yang Yang, Juan Huang, Hao Gong, Hongli Cui, Dongfeng Chen
BACKGROUND: The dysbiosis of intestinal microbiota plays an important role in the development of gut-derived infections, making it a potential therapeutic target against multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) after sepsis. However, the effectiveness of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) in treating this disease has been rarely investigated. METHODS: Two male patients, a 65-year-old and an 84-year-old, were initially diagnosed with cerebellar hemorrhage and cerebral infarction, respectively, after admission...
October 18, 2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
Sufyan Ahmad, Fatima Iftikhar, Farhat Ullah, Abdul Sadiq, Umer Rashid
Based on the pharmacological importance of dihydropyrimidine (DHPM) scaffold, substituted DHPMs linked with acetamide linker to substituted aromatic anilines were synthesized and evaluated for their potency as acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) inhibitors. The good AChE inhibitory activity of 4-dihydropyrimidine-2-thione (4a-h) and 2-amino-1,4-dihyropyrimidines (5a-h) series was observed with compound 4a and 4d identified as the most potent compounds with IC50 values of 0.17±0.01 and 0...
October 11, 2016: Bioorganic Chemistry
Najate Achamrah, Pierre Déchelotte, Moïse Coëffier
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Glutamine is the most abundant amino acid in plasma and plays a key role in maintaining the integrity of intestinal barrier. RECENT FINDINGS: Experimental studies showed that glutamine is able to modulate intestinal permeability and tight junction protein expression in several conditions. Recent articles underlined its putative beneficial role in gastrointestinal disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome. SUMMARY: Glutamine is a major nutrient to maintain intestinal barrier function in animals and humans...
October 5, 2016: Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care
Y-B Yu, D-Y Zhao, Q-Q Qi, X Long, X Li, F-X Chen, X-L Zuo
BACKGROUND: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) may play a vital role in the homeostatic regulation of intestinal barrier integrity. We aimed to investigate the physiological role of BDNF in maintaining the intestinal epithelial barrier using postinflammatory irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS) mice and explore the underlying molecular mechanisms using intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. METHODS: Postinflammatory-IBS mice were induced by intrarectal administration of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid and allowed to recover for 28 days...
October 17, 2016: Neurogastroenterology and Motility: the Official Journal of the European Gastrointestinal Motility Society
J L Chen, P Zheng, C Zhang, B Yu, J He, J Yu, J Q Luo, X B Mao, Z Q Huang, D W Chen
This study was conducted to investigate the effects of benzoic acid (BA) on growth performance, intestinal development and intestinal barrier function in weaned pigs. Ninety weaned pigs were randomly assigned to one of three treatments: a basal diet (CON), the basal diet supplemented with 2000 mg/kg benzoic acid (BA1) and 5000 mg/kg benzoic acid (BA2). At the end of days 14 and 42, six pigs per treatment were randomly selected to collect plasma and intestinal samples. Results showed that BA supplementation not only improved final body weight, daily growth and feed conversion ratio from days 15 to 42 and days 1 to 42, but also decreased the activity of plasma diamine oxidase (day 42) and the pH values of jejunal contents (day 14) (p < 0...
October 16, 2016: Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition
Maria Letizia Di Martino, Maurizio Falconi, Gioacchino Micheli, Bianca Colonna, Gianni Prosseda
Shigella is a highly adapted human pathogen, mainly found in the developing world and causing a severe enteric syndrome. The highly sophisticated infectious strategy of Shigella banks on the capacity to invade the intestinal epithelial barrier and cause its inflammatory destruction. The cellular pathogenesis and clinical presentation of shigellosis are the sum of the complex action of a large number of bacterial virulence factors mainly located on a large virulence plasmid (pINV). The expression of pINV genes is controlled by multiple environmental stimuli through a regulatory cascade involving proteins and sRNAs encoded by both the pINV and the chromosome...
2016: Frontiers in Molecular Biosciences
Lijun Du, John J Kim, Jinhua Shen, Ning Dai
The barrier function of the intestine is essential for maintaining the normal homeostasis of the gut and mucosal immune system. Abnormalities in intestinal barrier function expressed by increased intestinal permeability have long been observed in various gastrointestinal disorders such as Crohn's disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC), celiac disease, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Imbalance of metabolizing junction proteins and mucosal inflammation contributes to intestinal hyperpermeability. Emerging studies exploring in vitro and in vivo model system demonstrate that Rho-associated coiled-coil containing protein kinase- (ROCK-) and myosin light chain kinase- (MLCK-) mediated pathways are involved in the regulation of intestinal permeability...
2016: Gastroenterology Research and Practice
Ludmila Khailova, Christine H Baird, Aubri A Rush, Christopher Barnes, Paul E Wischmeyer
BACKGROUND & AIMS: Recent clinical trials and in vivo models demonstrate probiotic administration can reduce occurrence and improve outcome of pneumonia and sepsis, both major clinical challenges worldwide. Potential probiotic benefits include maintenance of gut epithelial barrier homeostasis and prevention of downstream organ dysfunction due to systemic inflammation. However, mechanism(s) of probiotic-mediated protection against pneumonia remain poorly understood. This study evaluated potential mechanistic targets in the maintenance of gut barrier homeostasis following Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) treatment in a mouse model of pneumonia...
October 1, 2016: Clinical Nutrition: Official Journal of the European Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition
Martin Aepfelbacher, Manuel Wolters
Pathogenic bacteria of the genus Yersinia include Y. pestis-the agent of plaque-and two enteropathogens, Y. enterocolitica, and Y. pseudotuberculosis. These pathogens have developed an array of virulence factors aimed at manipulating Rho GTP-binding proteins and the actin cytoskeleton in host cells to cross the intestinal barrier and suppress the immune system. Yersinia virulence factors include outer membrane proteins triggering cell invasion by binding to integrins, effector proteins injected into host cells to manipulate Rho protein functions and a Rho protein-activating exotoxin...
October 16, 2016: Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology
Maurizio Koch
Microbes are mostly important for the digestion of food, the absorption of some micronutrients, and the production of vitamins. The microbiota stimulates lymphoid structures in the gastrointestinal mucosa and decrease pathogens by competing for nutrients and space. Bacterial translocation is defined as the escape of gut bacteria and their products through the intestinal mucosa to the outside of the intestine as portovenous or systemic circulation. This is induced by a leaky gut barrier. There is evidence for a role of intestinal permeability in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease...
November 2016: Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology
Sarah A Ross, Jonathan A Lane, Mariarosaria Marotta, Devon Kavanaugh, Joseph Thomas Ryan, Lokesh Joshi, Rita M Hickey
Milk oligosaccharides have many associated bioactivities which can contribute to human health and offer protective properties to the host. Such bioactivities include anti-infective properties whereby oligosaccharides interact with bacterial cells and prevent adhesion to the host and subsequent colonization. Milk oligosaccharides have also been shown to alter the glycosylation of intestinal cells, leading to a reduction in pathogenic colonization. In addition, these sugars promote adhesion of commensal bacterial strains to host cells as well as possessing the ability to alter mucin expression in intestinal cells and improve barrier function...
November 2016: Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology
Muriel Mercier-Bonin, Bernard Despax, Patrice Raynaud, Eric Houdeau, Muriel Thomas
Given the growing use of nanotechnology in many common consumer products, including foods, evaluation of the consequences of chronic exposure to nanoparticles in humans has become a major public health issue. The oral route of exposure has been poorly explored, despite the presence of a fraction of nano-sized particles in certain food additives/supplements and the incorporation of such particles into packaging in contact with foods. After their ingestion, these nanoparticles pass through the digestive tract, where they may undergo physicochemical transformations, with consequences for the luminal environment, before crossing the epithelial barrier to reach the systemic compartment...
October 14, 2016: Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition
Xing-Quan Wang, Feng-Peng Wang, Wei Chen, Jun Huang, Kateryna Bazaka, Kostya Ken Ostrikov
Schistosoma japonicum is a widespread human and animal parasite that causes intestinal and hepatosplenic schistosomiasis linked to colon, liver and bladder cancers, and anemia. Estimated 230 million people are currently infected with Schistosoma spp, with 779 million people at risk of contracting the parasite. Infection occurs when a host comes into contact with cercariae, a planktonic larval stage of the parasite, and can be prevented by inactivating the larvae, commonly by chemical treatment. We investigated the use of physical non-equilibrium plasma generated at atmospheric pressure using custom-made dielectric barrier discharge reactor to kill S...
October 14, 2016: Scientific Reports
Seong-Hwan Park, Juil Kim, Dongwook Kim, Yuseok Moon
Deoxynivalenol (DON), the most prevalent mycotoxin worldwide, leads to economic losses for animal food production. Swine is a most sensitive domestic animal to DON due to rapid absorption and low detoxification by gut microbiota. Specifically, DON can severely damage pig intestinal tissue by disrupting the intestinal barrier and inducing inflammatory responses. We evaluated the effects of several mycotoxin detoxifiers including bentonites, yeast cell wall components, and mixture-typed detoxifier composed of mineral, microorganisms, and phytogenic substances on DON-insulted intestinal barrier and pro-inflammatory responses using in vitro porcine enterocyte culture model...
October 10, 2016: Toxicology in Vitro: An International Journal Published in Association with BIBRA
Ester Arévalo Sureda, Björn Weström, Stefan G Pierzynowski, Olena Prykhodko
BACKGROUND: The intestinal barrier is immature in newborn mammals allowing for transfer of bioactive macromolecules, e.g. protecting antibodies, from mother's milk to the blood circulation and in neonatal rodents lasts until weaning. This passage involves the neonatal-Fc-receptor (FcRn) binding IgG in the proximal and highly endocytic vacuolated enterocytes in the distal immature small intestine (SI). Recent studies have suggested an involvement of the transcription factor B-lymphocyte-induced maturation-protein-1 (Blimp-1) in the regulation of SI maturation in mice...
2016: PloS One
Wei Miao, Xiujuan Wu, Kang Wang, Wenjing Wang, Yumei Wang, Zhigang Li, Jingjing Liu, Li Li, Luying Peng
As a physiological small molecular product from the microbial fermentation of dietary fibers, butyrate plays an important role in maintaining intestinal health. Our previous works have proved that the effect of sodium butyrate (NaB) on the intestinal barrier function is mediated by activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). However, the detailed pathway involved remains unknown. Using the calcium switch assay in the Caco-2 cell monolayer model, we found here that NaB activated AMPK mainly by increasing the calcium level, but not the ATP concentration, via promoting store-operated calcium entry (SOCE)...
October 10, 2016: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
A Tassopoulos, A Chalkias, A Papalois, N Iacovidou, T Xanthos
The intestine is highly sensitive to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Intestinal I/R may cause local tissue injury and disruption of the intestinal mucosal barrier, allowing the passage of viable bacteria and endotoxins from the gastrointestinal lumen to distant organs. This phenomenon, known as bacterial translocation (BT), may lead to systemic disorders with high morbidity and mortality. Oxidative stress mediators such as reactive oxygen species, polymorphonuclear neutrophils and nitric oxide are believed to contribute to the intestinal I/R injury...
October 13, 2016: Redox Report: Communications in Free Radical Research
Jae Cheol Kim, Bruce P Mullan, John L Black, Robert J E Hewitt, Robert J van Barneveld, John R Pluske
BACKGROUND: This experiment was conducted to test the hypothesis that vitamin E (Vit E) and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), a cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor, will additively reduce the production of the immunosuppressive molecule prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and hence reduce inflammatory responses in weaner pigs experimentally infected with an enterotoxigenic strain of E. coli. METHODS: The experiment was conducted in a research facility with 192 individually-housed male weaner pigs (Landrace × Large White) weighing 6...
2016: Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology
Seungho Choi, Jong-Kyu Woo, Yeong-Su Jang, Ju-Hee Kang, Jung-Eun Jang, Tae-Hoo Yi, Sang-Yong Park, Sun-Yeou Kim, Yeo-Sung Yoon, Seung Hyun Oh
Inflammatory bowel disease is a chronic inflammatory disorder occurring in the gastrointestinal track. However, the efficacy of current therapeutic strategies has been limited and accompanied by side effects. In order to eliminate the limitations, herbal medicines have recently been developed for treatment of IBD. Peuraria Lobata (Peuraria L.) is one of the traditional herbal medicines that have anti-inflammatory effects. Bioavailability of Peuraria L., which is rich in isoflavones, is lower than that of their fermented forms...
September 2016: Laboratory Animal Research
Juliana E Bajic, Georgina L Eden, Lorrinne S Lampton, Ker Y Cheah, Kerry A Lymn, Jinxin V Pei, Andrea J Yool, Gordon S Howarth
AIM: To investigate the effects of orally gavaged aqueous rhubarb extract (RE) on 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced intestinal mucositis in rats. METHODS: Female Dark Agouti rats (n = 8/group) were gavaged daily (1 mL) with water, high-dose RE (HDR; 200 mg/kg) or low-dose RE (LDR; 20mg/kg) for eight days. Intestinal mucositis was induced (day 5) with 5-FU (150 mg/kg) via intraperitoneal injection. Intestinal tissue samples were collected for myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and histological examination...
October 7, 2016: World Journal of Gastroenterology: WJG
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