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Primary care career

Melanie J Lewis, Rose Ellis, Sunil K Adusumilli, Ian Cameron
INTRODUCTION: The New South Wales Rural Resident Medical Officer Cadetship Program began in 1988 as a strategy to increase the numbers of junior doctors in rural hospitals. This article outlines the results of an evaluation undertaken in 2014. Specifically, it will look at where former cadets who entered the program between 1989 and 2010 were working in 2014, what training programs they chose and their attitudes toward the program. METHOD: Data were collected using a semi-structured questionnaire sent to all the former cadets who entered the program from 1989 until 2010...
October 2016: Rural and Remote Health
Amara Krag, Gregory L Holmes
Infantile spasms, one of the catastrophic epilepsies, can be a diagnostic challenge since the clinical manifestations may be subtle and may mimic benign conditions. Because of the rarity of the condition, primary care physicians and pediatricians may never see a case of infantile spasms during their career and may be unfamiliar with the seizure semiology. This is a serious issue since there is evidence that early diagnosis and treatment may improve outcome. Patients and families are increasingly using the internet more than their physician as a source of medical information about epilepsy...
October 17, 2016: Epilepsy & Behavior: E&B
Gerald Kayingo, Owais Gilani, Vasco Deon Kidd, Mary L Warner
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The transformation of primary care (PC) training sites into patient-centered medical homes (PCMH) has implications for the education of health professionals. This study investigates the extent to which physician assistant (PA) students report learning about the PCMH model and how clinical exposure to PCMH might impact their interest in a primary care career. METHODS: An electronic survey was distributed to second-year PA students who had recently completed their PC rotation from 12 PA programs...
October 2016: Family Medicine
Jodie Oliver-Baxter, Lynsey Brown, Ellen McIntyre
Primary healthcare research strives for high-quality, priority-driven research to inform policy and practice. This relies on a robust and sustainable workforce to tackle complex problems faced in primary health care locally and globally. The current study investigated characteristics, experiences and career paths of the Australian primary healthcare research workforce. Thirty-seven former Research Higher Degree students from University Departments of General Practice and Rural Health completed a survey. Number of provisions for researchers and career path clarity were associated with job satisfaction...
October 14, 2016: Australian Journal of Primary Health
Bradley D Holbrook, Stephen M Petterson, William F Rayburn
Objectives Retirement of "baby boomer" physicians is a matter of growing concern in light of the shortage of certain physician groups. The objectives of this investigation were to define what constitutes a customary retirement age range of maternal-fetal medicine (MFM) physicians and examine how that compares with other obstetrician-gynecologist (ob-gyn) specialists. Study Design This descriptive study was based on American Medical Association Masterfile survey data from 2010 to 2014. Data from the National Provider Identifier were used to correct for upward bias in reporting retirement ages...
October 12, 2016: American Journal of Perinatology
Kim Brøsen, Stig Ejdrup Andersen, Jeanett Borregaard, Hanne Rolighed Christensen, Palle Mark Christensen, Kim Peder Dalhoff, Per Damkier, Jesper Hallas, Jens Heisterberg, Niels Jessen, Gesche Jürgens, Jens Peter Konnerup Kampmann, Britt Elmedal Laursen, Torben Laursen, Lars Peter Nielsen, Birgitte Klindt Poulsen, Henrik Enghusen Poulsen, Ljubica Vukelic Andersen, Thomas Senderovitz, Jesper Sonne
The Danish Society of Clinical Pharmacology was founded in 1976, and mainly thanks to the persistent efforts of the Society, clinical pharmacology became an independent medical speciality in Denmark in 1996. Since then, clinical pharmacology has gone from strength to strength. In the Danish health care system, clinical pharmacology has established itself as an indispensible part of the efforts to promote the rational, safe and economic use of drugs. Clinical pharmacologists are active in drug committees in both hospitals and in the primary sector...
September 29, 2016: Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology
Chinyere Mbachu, Obinna Onwujekwe, Nkoli Ezumah, Olayinka Ajayi, Olusola Sanwo, Benjamin Uzochukwu
Decentralisation is defined as the dispersion, distribution or transfer of resources, functions and decision-making power from a central authority to regional and local authorities. It is usually accompanied by assignment of accountability and responsibility for results. Fundamental to understanding decentralisation is learning what motivates central governments to give up power and resources to local governments, and the practical significance of this on their positions regarding decentralisation. This study examined key political and institutional influences on role-players' capacity to support decentralisation of HIV and AIDS treatment services to primary healthcare facilities, and implications for sustainability...
September 2016: African Journal of AIDS Research: AJAR
Cathy L Wogamon
The certified nursing assistant (CNA) is the caregiver who frequently identifies the first signs and symptoms of pressure ulcers (PUs) in the long-term care setting. A quality improvement effort was implemented to explore the effect of a 1-hour CNA education program about early identification, treatment, and prevention of PUs on PU knowledge, PU incidence, and PU prevention interventions, including skin checks. All 33 CNAs employed in a care facility for residents 55+ years old were invited to participate. CNA demographic and PU education variables were obtained...
September 2016: Ostomy/wound Management
Helen M Mohan, Vimal J Gokani, Adam P Williams, Rhiannon L Harries
Consultant Outcomes Publication (COP) has the longest history in cardiothoracic surgery, where it was introduced in 2005. Subsequently COP has been broadened to include all surgical specialties in NHS England in 2013-14. The Association of Surgeons in Training (ASiT) fully supports efforts to improve patient care and trust in the profession and is keen to overcome potential unintended adverse effects of COP. Identification of these adverse effects is the first step in this process: Firstly, there is a risk that COP may lead to reluctance by consultants to provide trainees with the necessary appropriate primary operator experience to become skilled consultant surgeons for the future...
September 19, 2016: International Journal of Surgery
Akiteru Takamura
This paper describes the background to, and the recent evolution of general practice as a recognised medical specialism in Japan (2015), and the evolution of a system of training to support this development. We, the general practitioners (GPs) in Japan have not been recognised as one body of medical specialists and have been training in our own way. A new certified training system will commence in 2018, authorised by a new third organisation, the Japanese Medical Specialty Board. An effective educational system has been developed for medical graduates that have a career intention in general practice that is distinct from other basic medical fields, but collaborates with them...
September 2016: Education for Primary Care
Eric Young, Chad Stickrath, Monica C McNulty, Aaron J Calderon, Elizabeth Chapman, Jed D Gonzalo, Ethan F Kuperman, Max Lopez, Christopher J Smith, Joseph R Sweigart, Cecelia N Theobald, Robert E Burke
BACKGROUND: Medical residents are routinely entrusted with transitions of care, yet little is known about the duration or content of their perceived responsibility for patients they discharge from the hospital. OBJECTIVE: To examine the duration and content of internal medicine residents' perceived responsibility for patients they discharge from the hospital. The secondary objective was to determine whether specific individual experiences and characteristics correlate with perceived responsibility...
September 14, 2016: Journal of General Internal Medicine
Christopher Chung, Hubert Maisonneuve, Eva Pfarrwaller, Marie-Claude Audétat, Alain Birchmeier, Lilli Herzig, Thomas Bischoff, Johanna Sommer, Dagmar M Haller
BACKGROUND: Switzerland is facing an impending primary care workforce crisis since almost half of all primary care physicians are expected to retire in the next decade. Only a minority of medical students choose a primary care specialty, further deepening the workforce shortage. It is therefore essential to identify ways to promote the choice of a primary care career. The aim of the present study was to explore students' views about the undergraduate primary care teaching curriculum and different teaching formats, and to evaluate the possible impact of these views on students' perceptions of primary care...
2016: BMC Family Practice
Eléonore Bayen, Florence Laigle-Donadey, Myrtille Prouté, Khê Hoang-Xuan, Marie-Eve Joël, Jean-Yves Delattre
PURPOSE: Informal caregivers (ICs) provide care and improve the quality of life of patients with malignant brain tumor. We analyze the impact of their involvement on themselves from a triple perspective. METHODS: Home-dwelling patients with primary malignant brain tumor underwent a medical examination. ICs burden was evaluated by a self-administered postal questionnaire. Objective burden (Informal Care Time, ICT), subjective burden (Zarit Burden Inventory, ZBI), and financial burden (valuation of lost earnings using the Replacement and Opportunity Cost Methods, RCM, OCM) were evaluated...
September 13, 2016: Supportive Care in Cancer: Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer
Joanna Veazey Brooks
PURPOSE: The environment during medical school has been shown to dissuade students from choosing primary care careers. The purpose of this study was (1) to explore how long-standing this hostility toward primary care is historically and (2) to understand the mechanisms through which the environment conveys disparagement of primary care to students. METHODS: The study is based on a qualitative analysis of 52 primary care physician oral histories. The data are from the Primary Care Oral History Collection, created by Fitzhugh Mullan and deposited in the National Library of Medicine...
September 2016: Annals of Family Medicine
Khalid Benkhadra, Jayanth Adusumalli, Tamim Rajjo, Philp T Hagen, Zhen Wang, M Hassan Murad
BACKGROUND: The healthcare needs of physician are not well studied. METHODS: We surveyed physicians attending a large primary care conference about their access and perceived barriers to receiving healthcare services. RESULTS: Response rate was 46 % (270/592). The majority were trained in family medicine. The age category of above 60 years was the most common (39 %) and 46 % were women. Important difficulty in accessing healthcare services was reported by 39 % of physicians and the majority (61 %) reported reverting to self-diagnosis and self-treatment...
2016: BMC Health Services Research
María Candelaria Ayuso-Raya, Francisco Escobar-Rabadán, Jesús López-Torres-Hidalgo, Julio Montoya-Fernández, Juan Manuel Téllez-Lapeira, Francisco Campa-Valera
CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: A cold climate towards primary care (PC) within medical academia could form a barrier against choosing family medicine (FM) as a career option. This study was designed to determine whether medical students' knowledge of and attitudes towards FM predicted their career choice. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cohort study conducted at two different medical schools. METHODS: After completing a PC course at the Albacete Medical School in 2005-2006, 81 second-year students were asked to give responses to a questionnaire...
July 2016: São Paulo Medical Journal, Revista Paulista de Medicina
Sonja Marjanovic, Catherine A Lichten, Enora Robin, Sarah Parks, Emma Harte, Calum MacLure, Clare Walton, James Pickett
OBJECTIVES: To identify research support strategies likely to be effective for strengthening the UK's dementia research landscape and ensuring a sustainable and competitive workforce. DESIGN: Interviews and qualitative analysis; systematic internet search to track the careers of 1500 holders of UK doctoral degrees in dementia, awarded during 1970-2013, to examine retention in this research field and provide a proxy profile of the research workforce. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: 40 interviewees based in the UK, whose primary role is or has been in dementia research (34 individuals), health or social care (3) or research funding (3)...
2016: BMJ Open
Halah Ibrahim, Satish Chandrasekhar Nair, Sami Shaban, Margaret El-Zubeir
BACKGROUND: In today's interdependent world, issues of physician shortages, skill imbalances and maldistribution affect all countries. In the United Arab Emirates (UAE), a nation that has historically imported its physician manpower, there is sustained investment in educational infrastructure to meet the population's healthcare needs. However, policy development and workforce planning are often hampered by limited data regarding the career choice of physicians-in-training. The purpose of this study was to determine the specialty career choice of applicants to postgraduate training programs in the UAE and factors that influence their decisions, in an effort to inform educational and health policy reform...
May 2016: Education for Health: Change in Training & Practice
Judith A Savageau, Linda Cragin, Warren J Ferguson, Laura Sefton, Joan Pernice
OBJECTIVES: In 2008 and 2013, the University of Massachusetts Medical School and the Massachusetts League of Community Health Centers surveyed community health center (CHC) primary care physicians (PCPs) to identify factors related to preparedness, recruitment and retention. The survey was repeated to determine the impact of Massachusetts health care reform. METHODS: An online survey was sent to 677 PCPs at 46 CHCs. New questions addressed patient-centered redesign, language competencies, and interprofessional care...
2016: Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
Björg Pálsdóttir, Jean Barry, Andreia Bruno, Hugh Barr, Amy Clithero, Nadia Cobb, Jan De Maeseneer, Elsie Kiguli-Malwadde, André-Jacques Neusy, Scott Reeves, Roger Strasser, Paul Worley
Across the globe, a "fit for purpose" health professional workforce is needed to meet health needs and challenges while capitalizing on existing resources and strengths of communities. However, the socio-economic impact of educating and deploying a fit for purpose health workforce can be challenging to evaluate. In this paper, we provide a brief overview of six promising strategies and interventions that provide context-relevant health professional education within the health system. The strategies focused on in the paper are:1...
2016: Human Resources for Health
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