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chest compressions

W Z Pan, D X Zhou, X C Zhang, L Zhang, L Wei, J B Ge
Objective: To investigate the safety and efficacy of transcatheter aortic valve replacement(TAVR) through transcarotid approach for patients with severe aortic valve stenosis. Methods: The clinical data of 9 symptomatic severe aortic valve stenosis patients who had high or prohibitive risk for surgery and not suitable for TAVR through femoral artery access,and thus received TAVR through transcarotid approach in our hospital from November 2015 to February 2017 were retrospectively analyzed.The patients were followed up to observe the safety and efficacy of the procedure...
March 24, 2018: Zhonghua Xin Xue Guan Bing za Zhi
Steve A Aguilar, Nicholas Asakawa, Cameron Saffer, Christine Williams, Steven Chuh, Lewei Duan
Introduction: A benefit of in-hospital cardiac arrest is the opportunity for rapid initiation of "high-quality" chest compressions as defined by current American Heart Association (AHA) adult guidelines as a depth 2-2.4 inches, full chest recoil, rate 100-120 per minute, and minimal interruptions with a chest compression fraction (CCF) ≥ 60%. The goal of this study was to assess the effect of audiovisual feedback on the ability to maintain high-quality chest compressions as per 2015 updated guidelines...
March 2018: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
Alicia Blackman, Wayne Mohammed
This case presents a woman in her early 20s who died after the sudden onset of chest pain. Five years earlier, she was investigated for a cardiac murmur during pregnancy and an echocardiogram revealed a 6.0×3.0 cm blood-filled sac compressing the left atrium and anterolateral aspect of the left ventricle with communication to the aortic root. She later had a CT scan of the chest with contrast, which showed aneurysmal dilatation of the left main coronary artery. She was placed on aspirin but defaulted from clinic 11 months post partum...
March 20, 2018: BMJ Case Reports
Roger W Nightingale, Cameron R Bass, Barry S Myers
BACKGROUND: Cervical bilateral facet dislocations are among the most devastating spine injuries in terms of likelihood of severe neurological sequelae. More than half of patients with tetraparesis had sustained some form of bilateral facet fracture dislocation. They can occur at any level of the sub-axial cervical spine, but predominate between C5 and C7. The mechanism of these injuries has long been thought to be forceful flexion of the chin towards the chest. This "hyperflexion" hypothesis comports well with intuition and it has become dogma in the clinical literature...
March 8, 2018: Clinical Biomechanics
Mosarrat J Qureshi, Manoj Kumar
BACKGROUND: Providing effective positive pressure ventilation is considered to be the single most important component of successful neonatal resuscitation. Ventilation is frequently initiated manually with bag and face mask (BMV) followed by endotracheal intubation if respiratory depression continues. These techniques may be difficult to perform successfully resulting in prolonged resuscitation or neonatal asphyxia. The laryngeal mask airway (LMA) may achieve initial ventilation and successful resuscitation faster than a bag-mask device or endotracheal intubation...
March 15, 2018: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
A Alaga, Y X Yew, M K Razul
A 47-year-old female, with multiple comorbidities, presented with a cough of two months, loss of weight and appetite. She was treated for pneumonia. A chest X-ray showed bilateral reticulonodular opacities. She was noted to have a vague central abdominal mass and a systolic murmur over the mitral region. Ultrasonography and computed tomography of the abdomen showed an omental mass and loculated ascites. Oesophagoduedenoscopy showed antral gastritis and during colonoscopy the surgical team was unable to advance the scope beyond 40 cm due to external compression...
December 2017: Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh
Dana E Niles, Jordan Duval-Arnould, Sophie Skellett, Lynda Knight, Felice Su, Tia T Raymond, Todd Sweberg, Anita I Sen, Dianne L Atkins, Stuart H Friess, Allan R de Caen, Hiroshi Kurosawa, Robert M Sutton, Heather Wolfe, Robert A Berg, Annemarie Silver, Elizabeth A Hunt, Vinay M Nadkarni
OBJECTIVES: Pediatric in-hospital cardiac arrest cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality metrics have been reported in few children less than 8 years. Our objective was to characterize chest compression fraction, rate, depth, and compliance with 2015 American Heart Association guidelines across multiple pediatric hospitals. DESIGN: Retrospective observational study of data from a multicenter resuscitation quality collaborative from October 2015 to April 2017. SETTING: Twelve pediatric hospitals across United States, Canada, and Europe...
March 10, 2018: Pediatric Critical Care Medicine
Catherine E Ross, Lisa A Asaro, David Wypij, Conor C Holland, Michael W Donnino, Monica E Kleinman
AIM: To quantify the physiologic effects of pre-arrest bolus dilute epinephrine in the pediatric intensive care unit. METHODS: Patients <18 years old and ≥37 weeks gestation who received an intravenous bolus of dilute epinephrine (10 mcg/mL) in the pediatric intensive care units at our institution from January 2011 to March 2017 were retrospectively identified. Patients were excluded if doses exceeded 20 mcg/kg, or under the following circumstances: orders limiting resuscitation, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, active chest compressions, simultaneous administration of other blood pressure-altering interventions or documented normotension prior to epinephrine...
March 8, 2018: Resuscitation
Yuanshan Liu, Zitong Huang, Heng Li, Guanghui Zheng, Qin Ling, Wanchun Tang, Zhengfei Yang
PURPOSE: We investigated the effects of a cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) feedback/prompt device on the quality of chest compression (CC) during hands-only CPR following the 2015 AHA guidelines. METHODS: A total of 124 laypersons were randomly assigned into three groups. The first (n=42) followed the 2010 guidelines, the second (n=42) followed the 2015 guidelines with no feedback/prompt device, the third (n=40) followed the 2015 guidelines with a feedback/prompt device (2015F)...
March 6, 2018: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
Yingying Hu, Jun Xu, Huadong Zhu, Guoxiu Zhang, Feng Sun, Yazhi Zhang, Xuezhong Yu
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the status of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in patients with sudden cardiac arrest (CA) in the emergency department. METHODS: A multicenter prospective observational study was conducted. The patients with CA admitted to 13 hospitals from 6 provinces in four different regions, including North China, Southern China, East China, Southwest China, from July 1st, 2015 to July 31st, 2017 were enrolled. A modified Utstein template was applied to collect clinical data, including general data, CA related data and prognosis, and primary outcome indicator was the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) rate, and the secondary outcome indicator was 28-day survival rate...
March 2018: Zhonghua Wei Zhong Bing Ji Jiu Yi Xue
John P Lichtenberger, Andrew M Kim, Dane Fisher, Peter S Tatum, Brian Neubauer, P Gabriel Peterson, Brett W Carter
Introduction: Combat-related thoracic trauma is a significant contributor to morbidity and mortality of the casualties from Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF). Penetrating, blunt, and blast injuries were the most common mechanisms of trauma. Imaging plays a key role in the management of combat-related thoracic trauma casualties. This review discusses the imaging manifestations of thoracic injuries from penetrating trauma, emphasizing epidemiology and diagnostic clues seen during OEF and OIF...
March 1, 2018: Military Medicine
Grace Koo, Neha Goyal, Jeanne M DeCara, Roberto M Lang, Karima Addetia
Good-quality chest compressions improve outcomes in cardiac arrest. While manual chest compressions are suboptimal in this regard, the LUCAS device has been shown to improve the effectiveness of chest compressions during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The complication rate associated with mechanical CPR, however, has not been adequately studied. Limited evidence suggests no difference in internal injury between manual and mechanical CPR. We report the case of a patient on anticoagulation who developed a mediastinal hematoma post mechanical CPR and on whom subtle findings on initial echocardiography could have alerted the clinician to this complication early during the clinical course...
March 6, 2018: Echocardiography
Carlos Cobo-Vázquez, Gemma De Blas, Pablo García-Canas, María Del Carmen Gasco-García
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation requires the provider to adopt positions that could be dangerous for his or her spine, specifically affecting the muscles and ligaments in the lumbar zone and the scapular spinal muscles. Increased fatigue caused by muscular activity during the resuscitation could produce a loss of quality and efficacy, resulting in compromising resuscitation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the maximum time a rescuer can perform uninterrupted chest compressions correctly without muscle fatigue...
2018: Anesthesia Progress
Benjamin Marchandot, François Levy, Nicola Santelmo, Paul-Michel Mertes, Olivier Morel
BACKGROUND: Adequate strategies using either transthoracic (TTE) or transesophageal (TEE) echocardiography in patients receiving cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an ongoing area of research. OBJECTIVES: As transthoracic point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) during cardiac arrest resuscitation might result in an increased duration of interruptions in the delivery of chest compressions; the use of TEE has been proposed as an alternative. METHODS: No technical complications of either TTE nor TEE are so far being reported in the literature...
March 2, 2018: Heart & Lung: the Journal of Critical Care
Dong Keon Yon, Tae Keun Ahn, Dong Eun Shin, Gwang Il Kim, Moon Kyu Kim
BACKGROUND: Germ cell tumors (GCTs) in children are rare neoplasms with diverse pathological findings according to the site and age of presentation. The most common symptoms in children with mediastinal GCTs, which are nonspecific, are dyspnea, chest pain, cough, hemoptysis, vena cava occlusion syndrome, and fatigue/weakness. Because of these nonspecific symptoms, it is difficult to suspect a mediastinal mass. A posterior mediastinal tumor causing spinal cord compression is an important example of an oncologic emergency arising from a neurogenic tumor...
March 5, 2018: BMC Pediatrics
Huiliang Yang, Gi Hye Im, Gunnlaugur Petur Nielsen, Arvin Kheterpal, Joseph H Schwab
Spinal giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is a rare benign, but locally aggressive, entity. We report the case of a 40-year-old man diagnosed with GCTB of the thoracic spine. The only symptom upon presentation was progressive back pain with pain radiating to the chest. Magnetic resonance imaging showed that the soft tissue mass extended posteriorly into the spinal canal, causing severe spinal cord compression. We initially treated this case with Decadron (Fresenius kabi, Bad Homburg vor der Hohe, Germany) for 1 week...
March 3, 2018: Skeletal Radiology
Daniela de Melo Miranda Gonçalves, Gustavo Falbo Wandalsen, Ana Sílvia Scavacini, Fernanda Cordoba Lanza, Ana Lucia Goulart, Dirceu Solé, Amélia Miyashiro Nunes Dos Santos
BACKGROUND: Pulmonary function in former preterm infants may be compromised during childhood. OBJECTIVES: To assess pulmonary function in very-low-birth-weight preterm infants at 6-12 months of corrected age and analyze the factors associated with abnormal pulmonary function. METHODS: Cross-sectional study with preterm infants at 6-12 months of corrected age with birth weight <1500 g. Children with malformations or affected by neuromuscular and respiratory diseases were excluded...
March 2018: Respiratory Medicine
Sunghoon Choi, Haenghwa Lee, Donghoon Lee, Seungyeon Choi, Chang-Lae Lee, Woocheol Kwon, Jungwook Shin, Chang-Woo Seo, Hee-Joung Kim
PURPOSE: This work describes the hardware and software developments of a prototype chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) R/F system. The purpose of this study is to validate the developed system for its possible clinical application on low-dose chest tomosynthesis imaging. METHODS: The prototype CDT R/F system was operated by carefully controlling the electromechanical subsystems through a synchronized interface. Once a command signal was delivered by the user, a tomosynthesis sweep started to acquire 81 projection views (PVs) in a limited angular range of ±20°...
March 3, 2018: Medical Physics
Jo-Anne Geere, Jamie Bartram, Laura Bates, Leslie Danquah, Barbara Evans, Michael B Fisher, Nora Groce, Batsirai Majuru, Michael M Mokoena, Murembiwa S Mukhola, Hung Nguyen-Viet, Phuc Pham Duc, Ashley Rhoderick Williams, Wolf-Peter Schmidt, Paul R Hunter
Background: The Sustainable Development Goals include commitments to end poverty, and promote education for all, gender equality, the availability of water and decent work for all. An important constraint is the fact that each day, many millions of women and children, and much less frequently men, carry their household's water home from off-plot sources. The burden of fetching water exacerbates gender inequality by keeping women out of education and paid employment. Despite speculation about the potential health impacts of fetching water, there is very little empirical evidence...
June 2018: Journal of Global Health
Amgad Hanna, Larry O'Neil Bodden, Gabriel R L Siebiger
Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is caused by compression of the brachial plexus and/or subclavian vessels as they pass through the cervicothoracobrachial region, exiting the chest. There are three main types of TOS: neurogenic TOS, arterial TOS, and venous TOS. Neurogenic TOS accounts for approximately 95% of all cases, and it is usually caused by physical trauma (posttraumatic etiology), chronic repetitive motion (functional etiology), or bone or muscle anomalies (congenital etiology). We present two cases in which neurogenic TOS was elicited by vascular compression of the inferior portion of the brachial plexus...
January 2018: Journal of Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Injury
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