Read by QxMD icon Read

Damage control resuscitation

J Michael Dickson, Xu Wang, Alexander E St John, Esther B Lim, Susan A Stern, Nathan J White
Introduction: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and hemorrhagic shock (HS) are the leading causes of traumatic death worldwide and particularly on the battlefield. They are especially challenging when present simultaneously (polytrauma), and clear blood pressure end points during fluid resuscitation are not well described for this situation. The goal of this study is to evaluate for any benefit of increasing blood pressure using a vasopressor on brain blood flow during initial fluid resuscitation in a swine polytrauma model...
March 14, 2018: Military Medicine
Penny S Reynolds, Bernard J Fisher, Jacquelyn McCarter, Christopher Sweeney, Erika J Martin, Paul Middleton, Matthew Ellenberg, Evan Fowler, Donald F Brophy, Alpha A Fowler, Bruce D Spiess, Ramesh Natarajan
BACKGROUND: Coagulopathy and inflammation induced by hemorrhagic shock and traumatic injury are associated with increased mortality and morbidity. Vitamin C (VitC) is an antioxidant with potential protective effects on the pro-inflammatory and pro-coagulant pathways. We hypothesized that high-dose VitC administered as a supplement to fluid resuscitation would attenuate inflammation, coagulation dysfunction, and end-organ tissue damage in a swine model of polytrauma and hemorrhage. METHODS: Male Sinclair swine (n = 24; mean body weight 27 kg) were anesthetized, intubated, mechanically ventilated, and instrumented for physiological monitoring...
March 12, 2018: Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery
David Macku, Pavel Hedvicak, John Quinn, Vladimir Bencko
Due to the hybrid warfare currently experienced by multiple NATO coalition and NATO partner nations, the tactical combat casualty care (TCCC) paradigm is greatly challenged. One of the major challenges to TCCC is the ad hoc extension phase in resource-poor environments, referred to as prolonged field care (PFC) and forward resuscitative care (FRC). The nuanced clinical skills with limited resources required by warfighters and auxiliary health care professionals to mitigate death on the battlefield and prevent morbidity and mortality in the PFC phase represent a balance that is still under review...
2018: Journal of Special Operations Medicine: a Peer Reviewed Journal for SOF Medical Professionals
Anna Clebone
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Trauma is the most common cause of pediatric mortality. Much of the research that led to life-saving interventions in adults, however, has not been replicated in the pediatric population. Children have important physiologic and anatomic differences from adults, which impact hemostasis and transfusion. Hemorrhage is a leading cause of death in trauma, and children have important differences in their coagulation profiles. Transfusion strategies, including the massive transfusion protocol and use of antifibrinolytics, are still controversial...
April 2018: Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology
Meghan Gilley, Suzanne Beno
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Damage control resuscitation is an overall management strategy used in trauma patients to rapidly restore physiologic stability, while mitigating hypothermia, coagulopathy and acidosis. We review the evidence and current practice of damage control resuscitation in pediatric trauma patients with a specific focus on fluid management. RECENT FINDINGS: There have been a number of studies over the last several years examining crystalloid fluid resuscitation, balanced blood product transfusion practice and hemostatic agents in pediatric trauma...
February 22, 2018: Current Opinion in Pediatrics
Christopher Kalhagen Bjerkvig, Theodor Fosse, Torunn Oveland Apelseth, Joar Sivertsen, Hanne Braathen, Håkon Skogrand Eliassen, Anne Berit Guttormsen, Andrew P Cap, Geir Strandenes
BACKGROUND: Intraosseous (IO) vascular access is increasingly used as an emergency tool for achieving access to the systemic circulation in critically ill patients. The role of IO transfusion of blood in Damage Control Resuscitation is however questionable due to possible inadequate flow rate and hemolysis. Some experts claim that IO transfusion is contraindicated. In this study we have challenged this statement by looking at flow rates of autologous fresh whole blood reinfusion and hemolysis using two of the commonly used FDA-approved and CE-marked sternal needles...
February 17, 2018: Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery
Martijn van Griensven, Daniel Ricklin, Stephanie Denk, Rebecca Halbgebauer, Christian K Braun, Anke Schultze, Felix Hönes, Sofia Koutsogiannaki, Alexandra Primikyri, Edimara Reis, David Messerer, Sebastian Hafner, Peter Radermacher, Ali-Reza Biglarnia, Ranillo R G Resuello, Joel V Tuplano, Benjamin Mayer, Kristina Nilsson, Bo Nilsson, John D Lambris, Markus Huber-Lang
Trauma-induced hemorrhagic shock (HS) plays a decisive role in the development of immune, coagulation, and organ dysfunction often resulting in a poor clinical outcome. Imbalanced complement activation is intricately associated with the molecular danger response and organ damage after HS. Thus, inhibition of the central complement component C3 as turnstile of both inflammation and coagulation is hypothesized as a rational strategy to improve the clinical course after HS.Applying intensive care conditions, anaesthetized, monitored, and protectively ventilated non-human primates (NHP; cynomolgus monkeys) received a pressure-controlled severe HS (60 min at MAP 30 mmHg) with subsequent volume resuscitation...
February 14, 2018: Shock
André Schulz, Pascal Stammet, Angelika M Dierolf, Claus Vögele, Stefan Beyenburg, Christophe Werer, Yvan Devaux
RATIONALE: Cardiac arrest (CA) is a serious condition characterized by high mortality rates, even after initial successful resuscitation, mainly due to neurological damage. Whether brain-heart communication is associated with outcome after CA is unknown. Heartbeat-evoked brain potentials (HEPs) represent neurophysiological indicators of brain-heart communication. The aim of this study was to address the association between HEPs and survival after CA. METHODS: HEPs were calculated from resting EEG/ECG in 55 CA patients 24 hours after resuscitation...
February 12, 2018: Resuscitation
Mohamed A T Mohamed, Tareq Maraqa, Matthew D Bacchetta, Michael McShane, Kenneth L Wilson
Introduction: Venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV-ECMO) has been gaining use to bridge the recovery from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) refractory to conventional treatment. However, these interventions are often limited to higher echelons of military care. We present a case of lung salvage from severe ARDS in an Afghani soldier with VV-ECMO at a Role-2 (R2) facility in an austere military environment in Afghanistan. Case: A 25-year-old Afghani soldier presented to an R2 facility with blast lung injury and multiple penetrating injuries following an explosion...
February 13, 2018: Military Medicine
Benjamin T Miller, Andrew H Lin, Susan C Clark, Andrew P Cap, Joseph J Dubose
BACKGROUND: The U.S. Navy's casualty-receiving ships provide remote damage control resuscitation (RDCR) platforms to treat injured combatants deployed afloat and ashore. We report a significant mass casualty incident aboard the USS Bataan, and the most warm fresh whole blood (WFWB) transfused at sea for traumatic hemorrhagic shock since the Vietnam War. METHODS: Casualty-receiving ships have robust medical capabilities, including a frozen blood bank with packed red blood cells (pRBC) and fresh frozen plasma (FFP)...
February 13, 2018: Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery
Federico Coccolini, Derek Roberts, Luca Ansaloni, Rao Ivatury, Emiliano Gamberini, Yoram Kluger, Ernest E Moore, Raul Coimbra, Andrew W Kirkpatrick, Bruno M Pereira, Giulia Montori, Marco Ceresoli, Fikri M Abu-Zidan, Massimo Sartelli, George Velmahos, Gustavo Pereira Fraga, Ari Leppaniemi, Matti Tolonen, Joseph Galante, Tarek Razek, Ron Maier, Miklosh Bala, Boris Sakakushev, Vladimir Khokha, Manu Malbrain, Vanni Agnoletti, Andrew Peitzman, Zaza Demetrashvili, Michael Sugrue, Salomone Di Saverio, Ingo Martzi, Kjetil Soreide, Walter Biffl, Paula Ferrada, Neil Parry, Philippe Montravers, Rita Maria Melotti, Francesco Salvetti, Tino M Valetti, Thomas Scalea, Osvaldo Chiara, Stefania Cimbanassi, Jeffry L Kashuk, Martha Larrea, Juan Alberto Martinez Hernandez, Heng-Fu Lin, Mircea Chirica, Catherine Arvieux, Camilla Bing, Tal Horer, Belinda De Simone, Peter Masiakos, Viktor Reva, Nicola DeAngelis, Kaoru Kike, Zsolt J Balogh, Paola Fugazzola, Matteo Tomasoni, Rifat Latifi, Noel Naidoo, Dieter Weber, Lauri Handolin, Kenji Inaba, Andreas Hecker, Yuan Kuo-Ching, Carlos A Ordoñez, Sandro Rizoli, Carlos Augusto Gomes, Marc De Moya, Imtiaz Wani, Alain Chichom Mefire, Ken Boffard, Lena Napolitano, Fausto Catena
Damage control resuscitation may lead to postoperative intra-abdominal hypertension or abdominal compartment syndrome. These conditions may result in a vicious, self-perpetuating cycle leading to severe physiologic derangements and multiorgan failure unless interrupted by abdominal (surgical or other) decompression. Further, in some clinical situations, the abdomen cannot be closed due to the visceral edema, the inability to control the compelling source of infection or the necessity to re-explore (as a "planned second-look" laparotomy) or complete previously initiated damage control procedures or in cases of abdominal wall disruption...
2018: World Journal of Emergency Surgery: WJES
Steven Sanders, Homer Tien, Jeannie Callum, Barto Nascimento, Henry Peng, Chris Funk, Joanne Schmid, Sandro Rizoli, Shawn Rhind, Andrew Beckett
Introduction: Hemorrhage is the most common cause of death among Special Operations Force (SOF) soldiers. Bringing remote damage control resuscitation into the far-forward combat environment is logistically challenging, as it requires blood products that generally require a robust cold chain. Alternatively, lyophilized products such as fibrinogen concentrate, which does not require thawing or blood group compatibility testing before use, might be advantageous in damage control resuscitation in the battlefield...
January 1, 2018: Military Medicine
Philip Dawe, Andrew Kirkpatrick, Max Talbot, Andrew Beckett, Naisan Garraway, Heather Wong, Syed Morad Hameed
BACKGROUND: Damage-control and emergency surgical procedures in trauma have the potential to save lives. They may occasionally not be performed due to clinician inexperience or lack of comfort and knowledge. METHODS: Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) non-surgeon Medical Officers (MOs) participated in a live tissue training exercise. They received tele-mentoring assistance using a secure video-conferencing application on a smartphone/tablet platform. Feasibility of tele-mentored surgery was studied by measuring their effectiveness at completing a set series of tasks in this pilot study...
February 2, 2018: American Journal of Surgery
Jad Chamieh, Priya Prakash, William J Symons
After the World War II, fecal diversion became the standard of care for colon injuries, although medical, logistic, and technical advancements have challenged this approach. Damage control surgery serves to temporize immediately life-threatening conditions, and definitive management of destructive colon injuries is delayed until after appropriate resuscitation. The bowel can be left in discontinuity for up to 3 days before edema ensues, but the optimal repair window remains within 12 to 48 hours. Delayed anastomosis performed at the take-back operation or stoma formation has been reported with variable results...
January 2018: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery
Brian C Beldowicz
Damage control surgery (DCS) began as an adjunct approach to hemorrhage control, seeking to facilitate the body's innate clotting ability when direct repair or ligation was impossible, but it has since become a valuable instrument for a broader collection of critically ill surgical patients in whom metabolic dysfunction is the more immediate threat to life than imminent exsanguination. Modern damage control is a strategy that combines the principles of DCS with those of damage control resuscitation. When used correctly, damage control may improve survival in previously unsalvageable patients; when used incorrectly, it can subject patients to imprudent risk and contribute to morbidity...
January 2018: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery
R Xiao, Y S Huang, G A Lin, S A Yuan, D S Hu
Objective: To explore the effects of cardiac support on delayed resuscitation in extensively burned patients with shock. Methods: Clinical data of 62 extensively burned patients with shock on admission, admitted to the 159th Hospital of PLA (hereinafter referred to as our hospital) from January 2012 to January 2017, were retrospectively analyzed. They were divided into cardiac support group ( n =35) and control group ( n =27) according to the use of deslanoside and ulinastatin. All patients were treated with routine fluid resuscitation based on the formula of the Third Military Medical University till post injury hour (PIH) 48...
January 20, 2018: Zhonghua Shao Shang za Zhi, Zhonghua Shaoshang Zazhi, Chinese Journal of Burns
Amit Aurora, Janet L Roe, Nsini A Umoh, Michael Dubick, Joseph C Wenke, Thomas J Walters
BACKGROUND: Hemorrhagic shock due to extremity vascular injuries is common in combat injuries. Fluid resuscitation is the standard treatment for severe hemorrhage. Tourniquets (TK) used for hemorrhage control cause ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury that induces edema formation in the injured muscle. Resuscitation fluids affect edema formation; however, its effect on long-term functional response remains unknown. The objectives of this study are 1) compare acute muscle damage; 2) determine long-term functional recovery of ischemic muscle, and 3) compare local and systemic inflammatory response including the expression of junctional proteins following early resuscitation with Hextend (HEX) and Fresh Whole Blood (FWB) using a rodent model of combined hemorrhage and TK-induced limb I/R...
January 24, 2018: Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery
Akiva Leibowitz, Evgeni Brotfain, Leonid Koyfman, Moti Klein, Shmuel Hess, Alexander Zlotnik, Matthew Boyko
INTRODUCTION: Treatment of combined traumatic brain injury and hemorrhagic shock, poses a particular challenge due to the possible conflicting consequences. While restoring diminished volume is the treatment goal for hypovolemia, maintaining adequate cerebral perfusion pressure and avoidance of secondary damage remains a treatment goal for the injured brain. Various treatment modalities have been proposed, but the optimal resuscitation fluid and goals have not yet been clearly defined...
January 17, 2018: European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery: Official Publication of the European Trauma Society
Linda Sonesson, Kenneth Boffard, Lars Lundberg, Martin Rydmark, Klas Karlgren
BACKGROUND: European surgeons are frequently subspecialized and trained primarily in elective surgical techniques. As trauma leaders, they may occasionally have to deal with complex polytrauma, advanced management techniques, differing priorities, and the need for multidisciplinary care. There is a lack of expertise, experience, and a low trauma volume, as well as a lack of research, with limited support as to the decision-making and teaching challenges present. We studied what experienced trauma experts describe as the challenges that are specific to the advanced surgical decision-making required, whether civilian, humanitarian, or military...
January 16, 2018: World Journal of Surgery
Giacomo Biasucci, Nicola Morelli, Federica Natacci, Massimo Mastrangelo
BACKGROUND: Perinatal asphyxia (PA) occurs in about 2 to 10 per 1000 live full-term births. Although neonatal epileptic seizures are observed in up to 60% of cases, PA may mimic or subtend other conditions. Hypoxia related brain injury is particularly relevant, as it may have permanent effects on neuropsychomotor development. Antepartum obstetric conditions, may, in turn, lead to hypoxic-ischemic damage to the fetus and the newborn, often underlying PA. Herein, a case of PA that hid and triggered signs and symptoms of Glutaric Aciduria type I (GA-I), is reported...
January 15, 2018: Italian Journal of Pediatrics
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"