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hand dexterity

Sharlene N Flesher, Jennifer L Collinger, Stephen T Foldes, Jeffrey M Weiss, John E Downey, Elizabeth C Tyler-Kabara, Sliman J Bensmaia, Andrew B Schwartz, Michael L Boninger, Robert A Gaunt
Intracortical microstimulation of the somatosensory cortex offers the potential for creating a sensory neuroprosthesis to restore tactile sensation. Whereas animal studies have suggested that both cutaneous and proprioceptive percepts can be evoked using this approach, the perceptual quality of the stimuli cannot be measured in these experiments. We show that microstimulation within the hand area of the somatosensory cortex of a person with long-term spinal cord injury evokes tactile sensations perceived as originating from locations on the hand and that cortical stimulation sites are organized according to expected somatotopic principles...
October 13, 2016: Science Translational Medicine
A Bell, L Tapsell, K Walton, A Yoxall
BACKGROUND: Hospitalised and community dwelling older people (aged 65 years and over) have difficulties opening certain food and beverage items (e.g. cheese portions and tetra packs) served in public hospitals. Previously, the role of hand strength on successful pack opening has been explored in a seated position. However, because many people in hospital eat in bed, the present laboratory study examined the differences between participants opening a selection of products in a hospital bed and a chair...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics: the Official Journal of the British Dietetic Association
Vincent Koppelmans, Yoo Young Hoogendam, Sarah Hirsiger, Susan Mérillat, Lutz Jäncke, Rachael D Seidler
Cerebellar volume declines with aging. Few studies have investigated age differences in regional cerebellar volume (RCV) and their association with motor and cognitive function. In 213 healthy older adults, we investigated the association of age with motor skills, cognition and RCV. Subsequently, we studied the association of RCV with motor skills and cognition. RCVs were derived from T1-weighted MRI scans using the automated SUIT segmentation method and clustered using principal component analysis (PCA). Motor skill (manual dexterity, tapping speed, bimanual visuomotor coordination, grip force) and cognition (mental rotation, verbal memory, inhibition, mental flexibility) were assessed...
October 3, 2016: Brain Structure & Function
Amanda M Hall, Bethan Copsey, Mark Williams, Cynthia Srikesavan, Sarah E Lamb
OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the effect of the 'Strengthening And stretching for Rheumatoid Arthritis of the Hand' (SARAH) exercise programme on hand function was mediated by changes in the proposed active ingredients: strength, dexterity, and/or range of motion. METHODS: The SARAH intervention included exercises hypothesized to improve potential mediators of grip strength, pinch strength, wrist flexion, wrist extension, finger flexion, finger extension, thumb opposition, and dexterity, which would theoretically improve self-reported hand function...
October 1, 2016: Arthritis Care & Research
Michelle Marneweck, Trevor Lee-Miller, Marco Santello, Andrew M Gordon
Theoretical perspectives on anticipatory planning of object manipulation have traditionally been informed by studies that have investigated kinematics (hand shaping and digit position) and kinetics (forces) in isolation. This poses limitations on our understanding of the integration of such domains, which have recently been shown to be strongly interdependent. Specifically, recent studies revealed strong covariation of digit position and load force during the loading phase of two-digit grasping. Here, we determined whether such digit force-position covariation is a general feature of grasping...
2016: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
Alastair J M Key
The human hand is unparalleled amongst primates in its ability to manipulate objects forcefully and dexterously. Previous research has predominantly sought to explain the evolution of these capabilities through an adaptive relationship between more modern human-like anatomical features in the upper limb and increased stone tool production and use proficiency. To date, however, we know little about the influence that other manipulatively demanding behaviors may have had upon the evolution of the human hand. The present study addresses one aspect of this deficiency by examining the recruitment of the distal phalanges during a range of manual transportation (i...
2016: PloS One
Isabelle Conforto, Emmanuel Coudeyre
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relation between prehension strength, dexterity and axonal loss in a same cohort of CMT1A patients with valid tools. CMT1A is the most common form of hereditary neuropathy. The upper limb impairment creates a weakness of intrinsic hand muscles, an opposition, prehension strength and axonal loss. MATERIALS/PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients were recruited from November 2012 to November 2014 by Physicals Rehabilitation Medicine and Neurologicals consultations of Clermont Ferrand's University Hospital...
September 2016: Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
Najmeh Hoseini, Felipe Munoz-Rubke, Hsuan-Yu Wan, Hannah J Block
Motor point associative stimulation (MPAS) in hand muscles is known to modify motor cortex excitability and improve learning rate, but not plateau of performance, in manual dexterity tasks. Central stimulation of motor cortex, such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), can have similar effects if accompanied by motor practice, which can be difficult and tiring for patients. Here we asked whether adding tDCS to MPAS could improve manual dexterity in healthy individuals who are already performing at their plateau, with no motor practice during stimulation...
September 21, 2016: Neuroscience Letters
Natasha A Lannin, Anne Cusick, Caroline Hills, Bianca Kinnear, Karin Vogel, Kate Matthews, Greg Bowring
BACKGROUND/AIM: Assistive technologies have the potential to increase the amount of movement practice provided during inpatient stroke rehabilitation. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using the Saebo-Flex(™) device in a subacute stroke setting to increase task-specific practice for people with little or no active hand movement. The secondary aim was to collect preliminary data comparing hand/upper limb function between a control group that received usual rehabilitation and an intervention group that used, in addition, the Saebo-Flex(™) device...
September 19, 2016: Australian Occupational Therapy Journal
Philippe Dahdal, Antonia Meyer, Chaturvedi Menorca, Karolina Nowak, Anne D Roesch, Peter Fuhr, Ute Gschwandtner
AIMS: The objective of this study was to investigate the relation between impaired fine motor skills in Parkinson disease (PD) patients and their cognitive status, and to determine whether fine motor skills are more impaired in PD patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) than in non-MCI patients. METHODS: Twenty PD MCI and 31 PD non-MCI patients (mean age 66.7 years, range 50-84, 36 males/15 females), all right-handed, took part in a motor performance test battery...
September 20, 2016: Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders
Abigail Thompson, Declan Murphy, Flavio Dell'Acqua, Christine Ecker, Grainne McAlonan, Henrietta Howells, Simon Baron-Cohen, Meng-Chuan Lai, Michael V Lombardo
BACKGROUND: Fine motor skill impairments are common in autism spectrum disorder (ASD), significantly affecting quality of life. Sensory inputs reaching the primary motor cortex (M1) from the somatosensory cortex (S1) are likely involved in fine motor skill and specifically motor learning. However, the role of these connections has not been directly investigated in humans. This study aimed to investigate, for the first time, the role of the S1-M1 connections in healthy subjects in vivo and whether microstructural alterations are associated with motor impairment in ASD...
July 1, 2016: Biological Psychiatry
Christian Rutz, Barbara C Klump, Lisa Komarczyk, Rosanna Leighton, Joshua Kramer, Saskia Wischnewski, Shoko Sugasawa, Michael B Morrissey, Richard James, James J H St Clair, Richard A Switzer, Bryce M Masuda
Only a handful of bird species are known to use foraging tools in the wild. Amongst them, the New Caledonian crow (Corvus moneduloides) stands out with its sophisticated tool-making skills. Despite considerable speculation, the evolutionary origins of this species' remarkable tool behaviour remain largely unknown, not least because no naturally tool-using congeners have yet been identified that would enable informative comparisons. Here we show that another tropical corvid, the 'Alalā (C. hawaiiensis; Hawaiian crow), is a highly dexterous tool user...
September 14, 2016: Nature
Gauravkumar K Patel, Strahinja Dosen, Claudio Castellini, Dario Farina
OBJECTIVE: Closing the loop in myoelectric prostheses by providing artificial somatosensory feedback to the user is an important need for prosthetic users. Previous studies investigated feedback strategies in combination with the control of one degree of freedom of simple grippers. Modern hands, however, are sophisticated multifunction systems. In this study, we assessed multichannel electrotactile feedback integrated with an advanced method for the simultaneous and proportional control of individual fingers of a dexterous hand...
October 2016: Journal of Neural Engineering
Jayme S Knutson, Douglas D Gunzler, Richard D Wilson, John Chae
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: It is unknown whether one method of neuromuscular electrical stimulation for poststroke upper limb rehabilitation is more effective than another. Our aim was to compare the effects of contralaterally controlled functional electrical stimulation (CCFES) with cyclic neuromuscular electrical stimulation (cNMES). METHODS: Stroke patients with chronic (>6 months) moderate to severe upper extremity hemiparesis (n=80) were randomized to receive 10 sessions/wk of CCFES- or cNMES-assisted hand opening exercise at home plus 20 sessions of functional task practice in the laboratory for 12 weeks...
October 2016: Stroke; a Journal of Cerebral Circulation
Markus Nowak, Claudio Castellini
Simultaneous and proportional myocontrol of dexterous hand prostheses is to a large extent still an open problem. With the advent of commercially and clinically available multi-fingered hand prostheses there are now more independent degrees of freedom (DOFs) in prostheses than can be effectively controlled using surface electromyography (sEMG), the current standard human-machine interface for hand amputees. In particular, it is uncertain, whether several DOFs can be controlled simultaneously and proportionally by exclusively calibrating the intended activation of single DOFs...
2016: PloS One
Hiroyuki Hayashi, Daiki Nakashima, Hiroka Matsuoka, Midori Iwai, Shugo Nakamura, Ayumi Kubo, Naoki Tomiyama
Exercise, such as cardiovascular fitness training, has been shown to have utility in improving executive function but is difficult for older adults with low mobility to perform. Accordingly, there is interest in the development of regimens other than high mobility exercises for older adults with low mobility. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between sensory motor function of the upper limb and executive function in community-dwelling older adults. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 57 right-handed, independent, community-dwelling older adults...
August 2016: Nagoya Journal of Medical Science
Chiung-Ju Liu, Deana Marie, Aaron Fredrick, Jessica Bertram, Kristen Utley, Elaine Ewing Fess
BACKGROUND: Hand function is critical for independence in activities of daily living for older adults. AIMS: The purpose of this study was to examine how grip strength, arm curl strength, and manual dexterous coordination contributed to time-based versus self-report assessment of hand function in community-dwelling older adults. METHODS: Adults aged ≥60 years without low vision or neurological disorders were recruited. Purdue Pegboard Test, Jamar hand dynamometer, 30-second arm curl test, Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test, and the Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument were administered to assess manual dexterous coordination, grip strength, arm curl strength, time-based hand function, and self-report of hand function, respectively...
August 30, 2016: Aging Clinical and Experimental Research
Richard J Hendrick, Christopher R Mitchell, S Duke Herrell, Robert J Webster
Natural orifice endoscopic surgery can enable incisionless approaches, but a major challenge is the lack of small and dexterous instrumentation. Surgical robots have the potential to meet this need yet often disrupt the clinical workflow. Hand-held robots that combine thin manipulators and endoscopes have the potential to address this by integrating seamlessly into the clinical workflow and enhancing dexterity. As a case study illustrating the potential of this approach, we describe a hand-held robotic system that passes two concentric tube manipulators through a 5 mm port in a rigid endoscope for transurethral laser prostate surgery...
November 2015: International Journal of Robotics Research
Johanna Neufuss, Tatyana Humle, Andrea Cremaschi, Tracy L Kivell
There has been an enduring interest in primate tool-use and manipulative abilities, most often with the goal of providing insight into the evolution of human manual dexterity, right-hand preference, and what behaviours make humans unique. Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) are arguably the most well-studied tool-users amongst non-human primates, and are particularly well-known for their complex nut-cracking behaviour, which has been documented in several West African populations. However, their sister-taxon, the bonobos (Pan paniscus), rarely engage in even simple tool-use and are not known to nut-crack in the wild...
August 26, 2016: American Journal of Primatology
Dexter Weeks, Morton L Kasdan, Bradon J Wilhelmi
BACKGROUND: The hands are commonly affected in severe thermal burn injuries. Resulting contractures lead to significant loss of function. Burn contracture release and skin grafting are necessary to restore hand function. We report a case in which surgical reconstruction of a volar hand burn was performed with full-thickness skin grafting. The patient had a 40-year follow-up to assess the function and cosmesis of the repaired hand. METHODS: We report a case in which a 15-month-old boy presented after receiving third-degree burns to the left volar hand, including the flexural aspects of the index, long, and ring fingers by placing it on a hot kitchen stove burner...
2016: Eplasty
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