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Kind representations

Matthieu Barbier, James R Watson
Predators of all kinds, be they lions hunting in the Serengeti or fishermen searching for their catch, display various collective strategies. A common strategy is to share information about the location of prey. However, depending on the spatial characteristics and mobility of predators and prey, information sharing can either improve or hinder individual success. Here, our goal is to investigate the interacting effects of space and information sharing on predation efficiency, represented by the expected rate at which prey are found and consumed...
October 2016: PLoS Computational Biology
Yehoshua Perl, James Geller, Michael Halper, Christopher Ochs, Ling Zheng, Joan Kapusnik-Uner
The purpose of the Big Data to Knowledge initiative is to develop methods for discovering new knowledge from large amounts of data. However, if the resulting knowledge is so large that it resists comprehension, referred to here as Big Knowledge (BK), how can it be used properly and creatively? We call this secondary challenge, Big Knowledge to Use. Without a high-level mental representation of the kinds of knowledge in a BK knowledgebase, effective or innovative use of the knowledge may be limited. We describe summarization and visualization techniques that capture the big picture of a BK knowledgebase, possibly created from Big Data...
October 17, 2016: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Takahiro Ogawa, Miki Haseyama
This paper presents adaptive subspace-based inverse projections via division into multiple sub-problems (ASIP-DIMS) for missing image data restoration. In the proposed method, a target problem for estimating missing image data is divided into multiple sub-problems, and each sub-problem is iteratively solved with constraints of other known image data. By projection into a subspace model of image patches, the solution of each subproblem is calculated, where we call this procedure "subspacebased inverse projection" for simplicity...
October 10, 2016: IEEE Transactions on Image Processing: a Publication of the IEEE Signal Processing Society
María Del Mar Roldán-García, María Jesús García-Godoy, José F Aldana-Montes
BACKGROUND: Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine - Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT) has been designed as standard clinical terminology for annotating Electronic Health Records (EHRs). EHRs textual information is used to classify patients' diseases into an International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM) category (usually by an expert). Improving the accuracy of classification is the main purpose of using ontologies and OWL representations at the core of classification systems...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Biomedical Semantics
Rafaela Teixeira Zorzanelli, Angela Vasconi Speroni, Rachel Aisengart Menezes, Annette Leibing
Based on a review of the literature published in the early twenty-first century by Brazilian researchers, the article offers an overview of stem cell research in Brazil. Three central topics were detected in these papers: (1) the funding of stem cell research in Brazil; (2) preclinical and clinical trials in Brazil; and (3) social anthropological analysis focused on ethical and legal matters. Our review identifies controversial questions in the construction of this scientific field, especially issues involving the media as a disseminator of values and of certain social representations, where new kinds of hope figure large...
October 10, 2016: História, Ciências, Saúde—Manguinhos
Naila Murray, Herve Jegou, Florent Perronnin, Andrew Zisserman
We consider the design of an image representation that embeds and aggregates a set of local descriptors into a single vector. Popular representations of this kind include the bag-of-visual-words, the Fisher vector and the VLAD. When two such image representations are compared with the dot-product, the image-to-image similarity can be interpreted as a match kernel. In match kernels, one has to deal with interference, i.e. with the fact that even if two descriptors are unrelated, their matching score may contribute to the overall similarity...
October 6, 2016: IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence
Daniel Machado, Markus J Herrgård, Isabel Rocha
Genome-scale metabolic reconstructions are currently available for hundreds of organisms. Constraint-based modeling enables the analysis of the phenotypic landscape of these organisms, predicting the response to genetic and environmental perturbations. However, since constraint-based models can only describe the metabolic phenotype at the reaction level, understanding the mechanistic link between genotype and phenotype is still hampered by the complexity of gene-protein-reaction associations. We implement a model transformation that enables constraint-based methods to be applied at the gene level by explicitly accounting for the individual fluxes of enzymes (and subunits) encoded by each gene...
October 2016: PLoS Computational Biology
David Glick
In this paper I elicit a prediction from structural realism and compare it, not to a historical case, but to a contemporary scientific theory. If structural realism is correct, then we should expect physics to develop theories that fail to provide an ontology of the sort sought by traditional realists. If structure alone is responsible for instrumental success, we should expect surplus ontology to be eliminated. Quantum field theory (QFT) provides the framework for some of the best confirmed theories in science, but debates over its ontology are vexed...
October 2016: Studies in History and Philosophy of Science
Jasper H Fabius, Alessio Fracasso, Stefan Van der Stigchel
As the neural representation of visual information is initially coded in retinotopic coordinates, eye movements (saccades) pose a major problem for visual stability. If no visual information were maintained across saccades, retinotopic representations would have to be rebuilt after each saccade. It is currently strongly debated what kind of information (if any at all) is accumulated across saccades, and when this information becomes available after a saccade. Here, we use a motion illusion to examine the accumulation of visual information across saccades...
September 30, 2016: Scientific Reports
Sandeep Raj, Kailash Chandra Ray, Om Shankar
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The increase in the number of deaths due to cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) has gained significant attention from the study of electrocardiogram (ECG) signals. These ECG signals are studied by the experienced cardiologist for accurate and proper diagnosis, but it becomes difficult and time-consuming for long-term recordings. Various signal processing techniques are studied to analyze the ECG signal, but they bear limitations due to the non-stationary behavior of ECG signals...
November 2016: Computer Methods and Programs in Biomedicine
Jordan W Suchow, Daryl Fougnie, George A Alvarez
Confidence in our memories is influenced by many factors, including beliefs about the perceptibility or memorability of certain kinds of objects and events, as well as knowledge about our skill sets, habits, and experiences. Notoriously, our knowledge and beliefs about memory can lead us astray, causing us to be overly confident in eyewitness testimony or to overestimate the frequency of recent experiences. Here, using visual working memory as a case study, we stripped away all these potentially misleading cues, requiring observers to make confidence judgments by directly assessing the quality of their memory representations...
September 29, 2016: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Learning, Memory, and Cognition
Thea Zander, Michael Öllinger, Kirsten G Volz
Intuition and insight are intriguing phenomena of non-analytical mental functioning: whereas intuition denotes ideas that have been reached by sensing the solution without any explicit representation of it, insight has been understood as the sudden and unexpected apprehension of the solution by recombining the single elements of a problem. By face validity, the two processes appear similar; according to a lay perspective, it is assumed that intuition precedes insight. Yet, predominant scientific conceptualizations of intuition and insight consider the two processes to differ with regard to their (dis-)continuous unfolding...
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
Ajay B Satpute, Erik C Nook, Sandhya Narayanan, Jocelyn Shu, Jochen Weber, Kevin N Ochsner
The demands of social life often require categorically judging whether someone's continuously varying facial movements express "calm" or "fear," or whether one's fluctuating internal states mean one feels "good" or "bad." In two studies, we asked whether this kind of categorical, "black and white," thinking can shape the perception and neural representation of emotion. Using psychometric and neuroimaging methods, we found that (a) across participants, judging emotions using a categorical, "black and white" scale relative to judging emotions using a continuous, "shades of gray," scale shifted subjective emotion perception thresholds; (b) these shifts corresponded with activity in brain regions previously associated with affective responding (i...
September 26, 2016: Psychological Science
Gennady Erlikhman, Gideon P Caplovitz
During dynamic occlusion, an object passes behind an occluding surface and then later reappears. Even when completely occluded from view, such objects are experienced as continuing to exist or persist behind the occluder, even though they are no longer visible. The contents and neural basis of this persistent representation remain poorly understood. Questions remain as to whether there is information maintained about the object itself (i.e. its shape or identity) or, non-object-specific information such as its position or velocity as it is tracked behind an occluder as well as which areas of visual cortex represent such information...
September 20, 2016: NeuroImage
Barbara Landau
In this article, I revisit Landau and Jackendoff's () paper, "What and where in spatial language and spatial cognition," proposing a friendly amendment and reformulation. The original paper emphasized the distinct geometries that are engaged when objects are represented as members of object kinds (named by count nouns), versus when they are represented as figure and ground in spatial expressions (i.e., play the role of arguments of spatial prepositions). We provided empirical and theoretical arguments for the link between these distinct representations in spatial language and their accompanying nonlinguistic neural representations, emphasizing the "what" and "where" systems of the visual system...
September 16, 2016: Cognitive Science
Stefan Huber, Hans-Christoph Nuerk, Klaus Willmes, Korbinian Moeller
Different models have been proposed for the processing of multisymbol numbers like two- and three-digit numbers but also for negative numbers and decimals. However, these multisymbol numbers are assembled from the same set of Arabic digits and comply with the place-value structure of the Arabic number system. Considering these shared properties, we suggest that the processing of multisymbol numbers can be described in one general model framework. Accordingly, we first developed a computational model framework realizing componential representations of multisymbol numbers and evaluated its validity by simulating standard empirical effects of number magnitude comparison...
September 12, 2016: Psychological Review
Alessandra Giorgi
This article considers a special kind of surprise questions, i.e. those introduced by the adversative particle ma (but), and compares it with surprise exclamations. The main issue addressed here concerns the obligatory presence in the questions of the imperfect verbal form, versus the obligatory presence in exclamations of a non-imperfect indicative. It will be shown that the special semantics associated with these structures determines the presence of a certain verbal form. Some syntactic issues will be addressed in the final section, having to do with the representation in the syntax of properties connected to the context...
2016: SpringerPlus
Kenji Ogawa, Fumihito Imai
Previous neuropsychological studies of ideomotor apraxia (IMA) indicated impairments in pantomime actions for tool use for both right and left hands following lesions of parieto-premotor cortices in the left hemisphere. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with multi-voxel pattern analysis (MVPA), we tested the hypothesis that the left parieto-premotor cortices are involved in the storage or retrieval of hand-independent representation of tool-use actions. In the fMRI scanner, one of three kinds of tools was displayed in pictures or letters, and the participants made pantomimes of the use of these tools using the right hand for the picture stimuli or with the left hand for the letters...
September 3, 2016: Experimental Brain Research. Experimentelle Hirnforschung. Expérimentation Cérébrale
Issam El Naqa
Oncology, with its unique combination of clinical, physical, technological, and biological data provides an ideal case study for applying big data analytics to improve cancer treatment safety and outcomes. An oncology treatment course such as chemoradiotherapy can generate a large pool of information carrying the 5Vs hallmarks of big data. This data is comprised of a heterogeneous mixture of patient demographics, radiation/chemo dosimetry, multimodality imaging features, and biological markers generated over a treatment period that can span few days to several weeks...
August 29, 2016: Methods: a Companion to Methods in Enzymology
William S Horton, Susan E Brennan
In this paper we consider the potential role of metarepresentation-the representation of another representation, or as commonly considered within cognitive science, the mental representation of another individual's knowledge and beliefs-in mediating definite reference and common ground in conversation. Using dialogues from a referential communication study in which speakers conversed in succession with two different addressees, we highlight ways in which interlocutors work together to successfully refer to objects, and achieve shared conceptualizations...
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
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