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Central venous access devices

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28599498/sequential-administration-of-xelox-and-xeliri-is-effective-feasible-and-well-tolerated-by-patients-with-metastatic-colorectal-cancer
#1
Taro Fukui, Koichi Suzuki, Kosuke Ichida, Yuji Takayama, Nao Kakizawa, Yuta Muto, Fumi Hasegawa, Fumiaki Watanabe, Rina Kikugawa, Masaaki Saito, Shingo Tsujinaka, Yasuyuki Miyakura, Toshiki Rikiyama
Sequential administration of the chemotherapy regimes capecitabine and oxaliplatin (XELOX) and capecitabine and irinotecan (XELIRI) in the first- to second-line treatment setting would allow patients to be managed more easily in an outpatient unit. However, a small number of studies have raised concerns of cumulative adverse events as a consequence of the continuous use of capecitabine. To investigate this, the present study conducted a retrospective review of 81 consecutive metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients treated with the oxaliplatin, fluorouracil and leucovorin-irinotecan, fluorouracil and leucovorin (FOLFOX-FOFIRI/F-F) regimen (n=40) or the XELOX-XELIRI (X-X) regimen (n=41) in first- to second-line chemotherapy in Saitama Medical Center between 2006 and 2012...
June 2017: Oncology Letters
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28585784/-use-of-ultrasound-for-placement-of-central-venous-catheters-in-pediatrics-results-of-a-national-survey
#2
Á Sánchez Sánchez, O Girón Vallejo, R Ruiz-Pruneda, M Fernández Ibieta, P Y Reyes Ríos, V Villamil, I Martínez-Castaño, J Rojas Ticona, M C Giménez Aleixandre, J I Ruiz Jiménez
OBJECTIVES: To study the variability of techniques used for vascular access of central venous devices, totally implanted and external tunneled, as well as polling the use of ultrasound by pediatric surgeons in Spain. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Descriptive study of a survey results, conducted by phone, email and online, about 20 items related to the placement of these devices in children and the use of ultrasound in this procedure. RESULTS: We analyzed 71 surveys from 31 national hospitals...
January 25, 2017: Cirugía Pediátrica: Organo Oficial de la Sociedad Española de Cirugía Pediátrica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28584903/incidence-and-outcome-of-retained-port-a-cath-fragments-during-removal
#3
Olugbenga Michael Aworanti, Niall Linnane, Farhan Tareen, Alan Mortell
PURPOSE: Port-A-Cath devices are frequently used for long-term venous access. We postulate that long-term use predisposes them to getting stuck and retained in a central vein at the time of removal. We aim to report the incidence and outcome of this complication. METHODS: Between January 2006 and July 2016, a retrospective review of all Port-A-Cath removals that were performed at our centre was conducted. At the time of removal, catheters that could not be removed from the vein were considered retained...
June 5, 2017: Pediatric Surgery International
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28579360/complications-of-long-and-intermediate-term-venous-catheters-in-cystic-fibrosis-patients-a-multicenter-study
#4
Teresa L May, Alex H Gifford, Thomas Lahiri, Adam Black, Janet Trang, Alexandra G Cornell, Karyll Gonzalez, Scott Morin, Mark Napier, Christine W Duarte, Jonathan B Zuckerman
BACKGROUND: Totally implantable venous access devices (TIVADs) or peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) are commonly used in the care of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), but they are associated with various complications, including thrombosis, infection, and insertion site symptoms. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective review of PICC and TIVAD use in adults and children with CF over an 8-year period at 3 accredited care centers. Patient attributes included CFTR genotype, comorbidities, lung function, body mass index, use of anticoagulation, and respiratory tract microbiology...
June 1, 2017: Journal of Cystic Fibrosis: Official Journal of the European Cystic Fibrosis Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28574141/totally-implantable-venous-access-devices-in-children-with-medical-complexity-preliminary-data-from-a-tertiary-care-hospital
#5
Caterina Geremia, Maria Antonietta De Ioris, Alessandro Crocoli, Ottavio Adorisio, Raffaella Scrocca, Mary Haywood Lombardi, Susanna Staccioli, Pietro Stella, Paola Amendola, Gaetano Ciliento, Francesco De Peppo, Andrea Campana
INTRODUCTION: Children with special health-care needs are an emerging and consistent population. In a subset of children with medical complexity (CMC) a continuous access to the central vascular system is advisable to eliminate unnecessary pain and stress and to improve home management and palliative care. METHODS: The surgical registry of a tertiary hospital was checked in order to identify CMC who underwent totally implantable venous access device (VAD) placement...
May 24, 2017: Journal of Vascular Access
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28558699/incidence-of-and-factors-associated-with-catheter-related-bloodstream-infection-in-patients-with-advanced-solid-tumors-on-home-parenteral-nutrition-managed-using-a-standardized-catheter-care-protocol
#6
Pankaj G Vashi, Natasha Virginkar, Brenten Popiel, Persis Edwin, Digant Gupta
BACKGROUND: Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) are associated with high morbidity and mortality as well as increased medical costs. Cancer patients, who are often immunocompromised, are susceptible to CRBSI while receiving home parenteral nutrition (HPN). We evaluated the incidence of and factors associated with CRBSIs in cancer patients undergoing HPN managed using a standardized catheter care protocol. METHODS: This is a retrospective cohort study of 335 cancer patients receiving HPN between January 2012 and July 2015...
May 30, 2017: BMC Infectious Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28549710/complication-rates-observed-in-silicone-and-polyurethane-catheters-of-totally-implanted-central-venous-access-devices-implanted-in-the-upper-arm
#7
Jasmin D Busch, Maren Vens, Catherine Mahler, Jochen Herrmann, Gerhard Adam, Harald Ittrich
PURPOSE: To present frequency and types of complications related to silicone (SI) versus polyurethane (PUR) catheters of totally implanted venous access devices (TIVADs) placed in the upper arm. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A cohort of 2,491 consecutive patients with TIVADs implanted between 2006 and 2015 was retrospectively analyzed. Complications were classified according to SIR guidelines. Pearson χ(2) test was used for categorical variables, and Student t test was used for continuous variables...
May 24, 2017: Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology: JVIR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28544163/the-impact-of-clinical-practice-on-the-outcome-of-central-venous-access-devices-in-children-with-haemophilia
#8
K Khair, S Ranta, A Thomas, K Lindvall
INTRODUCTION: Central venous access devices facilitate home treatment in boys with haemophilia. These are usually fully implanted lines, referred to as ports. Caregivers are taught to manage the port using sterile techniques and maintaining patency by flushing with saline or heparin solution. National and international guidelines for the home care of ports are lacking. AIM: To evaluate if infection or occlusion rates differ between home care regimens used for ports in children with haemophilia...
May 24, 2017: Haemophilia: the Official Journal of the World Federation of Hemophilia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28511483/a-study-of-morbidity-and-cost-of-peripheral-venous-cannulation-in-neonates-admitted-to-paediatric-surgical-intensive-care-unit
#9
Sushama Raghunath Tandale, Nandini Dave, Madhu Garasia, Shalil Patil, Sandesh Parelkar
INTRODUCTION: Peripheral venous access in sick neonates is indicated for administration of fluids, drugs or nutrients. AIM: We conducted an audit of peripheral venous access in neonates admitted to paediatric surgical intensive care unit to study the morbidity, time spent on cannulation and cost with its use. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred consecutive neonates requiring hospital admission to paediatric surgical intensive care unit in a period of one year were included in the study...
March 2017: Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research: JCDR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28499668/a-multicenter-feasibility-study-on-ultrafiltration-via-a-single-peripheral-venous-access-in-acute-heart-failure-with-overt-fluid-overload
#10
Marco Morpurgo, Mario Pasqualini, Maria Cristiana Brunazzi, Gabriele Vianello, Roberto Valle, Loris Roncon, Fulvio Fiorini, Nadia Aspromonte, Mario Barbiero, Marco Goldoni, Giancarlo Marenzi
OBJECTIVES: The need for a central venous catheter has limited the widespread use of ultrafiltration in daily clinical practice for the treatment of acute heart failure (AHF) with overt fluid overload. We evaluated the feasibility of a new ultrafiltration device, the CHIARA (Congestive Heart Impairment Advanced Removal Approach) system, that utilizes a single-lumen cannula (17G, multi-hole) inserted in a peripheral vein of the arm. METHODS: In this multicenter, prospective, feasibility study, consecutive ultrafiltration treatments (lasting ≥6 hours and with an ultrafiltration rate ≥100ml/h) with the CHIARA device and a single peripheral venous approach were performed at 6 Italian hospitals...
May 2, 2017: International Journal of Cardiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28495535/endoluminal-dilation-technique-to-remove-stuck-port-a-cath-a-case-report
#11
Paolo Cerini, Giuseppe Guzzardi, Andrea Galbiati, Carmelo Stanca, Bruno Del Sette, Alessandro Carriero
Port-a-cath is a type of central venous catheter (CVC) designed to allow repeated access to the venous system for parenteral delivery of medications, fluids, and nutritional solutions and for sampling venous blood. After years of use or in case of damage, CVC must be removed and eventually replaced: the recovery of the device should normally be easy, with a small surgical incision of the skin and tissues surrounding the device and pulling the catheter. Sometimes scar tissue can develop around the device, making it resistant to removal even after application of forceful traction...
May 8, 2017: Annals of Vascular Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28475442/investigating-histological-aspects-of-scars-in-children
#12
I Westra, P D H M Verhaegen, H Ibrahim Korkmaz, K I Braam, G J L Kaspers, H W M Niessen, F B Niessen
OBJECTIVE: Very little is known about histological aspects of paediatric scars and the possible role of the immune system during their formation. In this study, the histology thoracic scars caused by the placement of an implantable central venous access device in children who underwent treatment for cancer was assessed. METHOD: The amount and type of collagen, the collagen orientation, the type of elastic fibres, the vascularsation, and the count of neutrophils, macrophages, and lymphocytes were analysed...
May 2, 2017: Journal of Wound Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28471881/management-of-central-venous-access-device-associated-skin-impairment-an-evidence-based-algorithm
#13
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2017: Journal of Wound, Ostomy, and Continence Nursing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28424889/quality-of-life-with-biweekly-docetaxel-and-capecitabine-in-advanced-gastro-oesophageal-cancer
#14
E A Korkeila, T Salminen, R Kallio, M Mikkola, P Auvinen, S Pyrhönen, R Ristamäki
PURPOSE: This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and tolerability of biweekly docetaxel with capecitabine as first-line treatment in advanced gastro-oesophageal cancer. METHODS: Fifty-three patients at median age of 61 years with advanced gastric cancer were included in this prospective, non-randomized, multicentre phase II trial to receive intravenous docetaxel 50 mg/m(2) on days 1 and 15, and oral capecitabine 1250 mg/m(2) every 12 h, on days 1-7 and 15-21 of each 28-day cycle...
April 20, 2017: Supportive Care in Cancer: Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28373261/how-i-treat-central-venous-access-device-related-upper-extremity-deep-vein-thrombosis
#15
REVIEW
Anita Rajasekhar, Michael B Streiff
Central venous access device (CVAD)-related thrombosis (CRT) is a common complication among patients requiring central venous access as part of their medical care. Complications of CRT include pulmonary embolism, recurrent deep venous thrombosis, loss of central venous access, and postthrombotic syndrome. Patient-, device-, and treatment-related factors can influence the risk of CRT. Despite numerous randomized controlled trials, the clinical benefit of pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis for the prevention of CRT remains to be established...
May 18, 2017: Blood
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28365664/complications-of-peripheral-venous-access-devices-prevention-detection-and-recovery-strategies
#16
Elizabeth A Mattox
Most hospitalized patients have placement of a peripheral venous access device, either a short peripheral catheter or a peripherally inserted central catheter. Compared with central venous catheters that are not peripherally inserted, the other 2 types are generally perceived by health care providers as safer and less complicated to manage, and less emphasis is placed on the prevention and management of complications. Expertise of nurses in inserting, managing, and removing these devices may reduce the likelihood of complications, and increased recognition of complications associated with use of the devices is important to ensure continued improvements in the safety, quality, and efficiency of health care...
April 2017: Critical Care Nurse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28353488/management-of-central-venous-access-device-associated-skin-impairment-an-evidence-based-algorithm
#17
Daphne Broadhurst, Nancy Moureau, Amanda J Ullman
Patients relying on central venous access devices (CVADs) for treatment are frequently complex. Many have multiple comorbid conditions, including renal impairment, nutritional deficiencies, hematologic disorders, or cancer. These conditions can impair the skin surrounding the CVAD insertion site, resulting in an increased likelihood of skin damage when standard CVAD management practices are employed. Supported by the World Congress of Vascular Access (WoCoVA), developed an evidence- and consensus-based algorithm to improve CVAD-associated skin impairment (CASI) identification and diagnosis, guide clinical decision-making, and improve clinician confidence in managing CASI...
May 2017: Journal of Wound, Ostomy, and Continence Nursing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28323880/randomized-controlled-trials-in-central-vascular-access-devices-a-scoping-review
#18
Mari Takashima, Gillian Ray-Barruel, Amanda Ullman, Samantha Keogh, Claire M Rickard
BACKGROUND: Randomized controlled trials evaluate the effectiveness of interventions for central venous access devices, however, high complication rates remain. Scoping reviews map the available evidence and demonstrate evidence deficiencies to focus ongoing research priorities. METHOD: A scoping review (January 2006-December 2015) of randomized controlled trials evaluating the effectiveness of interventions to improve central venous access device outcomes; including peripherally inserted central catheters, non-tunneled, tunneled and totally implanted venous access catheters...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28323667/central-venous-access-in-children-indications-devices-and-risks
#19
Guillermo Ares, Catherine J Hunter
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Central venous catheters (CVCs) have a prominent role in the diagnostic and therapy of neonates and children. Herein, we describe the multiple indications for CVC use and the different devices available for central venous access. Given the prevalent use of CVCs, healthcare systems are focused on reducing complications from their use, particularly central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs). The most up-to-date information available sheds light on best practices and future areas of investigation...
June 2017: Current Opinion in Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28297066/cerebral-hyperperfusion-and-other-consequences-of-hemodialysis-central-vein-catheters
#20
Haimanot Wasse
While central venous stenosis is a common consequence of protracted central venous catheter use, intracardiac device transvenous leads, and central venous instrumentation, the majority of patients who develop symptomatic central venous stenosis present with characteristic venous hypertension. However, some patients may develop an abnormal intracranial venous circulation and present with neurologic symptoms. This paper will summarize findings from case reports that describe the neurologic sequelae that can develop as a result of central venous stenosis/occlusion in end-stage renal disease patients with a functional arteriovenous access...
March 6, 2017: Journal of Vascular Access
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