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Central venous access devices

Maurizio Pacilli, Catherine J Bradshaw, Simon A Clarke
INTRODUCTION: Medium-term intravenous access in children is normally achieved by means of repeated multiple peripheral intravenous cannula insertions or peripherally inserted central catheters. Long peripheral cannulas might offer an alternative to these devices in children. Our aim was to clarify whether long peripheral cannulas provide reliable medium-term intravenous access avoiding the need for multiple peripheral intravenous cannulations or peripherally inserted central catheter insertion in children undergoing surgery...
March 1, 2018: Journal of Vascular Access
Shin-Seok Yang, Moon Sang Ahn
BACKGROUND: To evaluate the safety, technical feasibility, and complications of totally implanted central venous access ports (TIVAPs) in the upper arm, for comparison with trans-jugular chest ports in patients with breast cancer. METHODS: In total, 223 consecutive female breast cancer patients who received a TIVAP in the upper arm or chest between July 2014 and February 2016 were included. All procedures were performed via a sonographic and fluoroscopic-guided approach using the Seldinger technique under local anesthesia...
February 23, 2018: Annals of Vascular Surgery
Tracy N Zembles, Linda S Flannery, Anna R Huppler
PURPOSE: The development and implementation of an antimicrobial lock therapy guideline at a large pediatric hospital are described. SUMMARY: Central venous access devices (CVADs) are essential in the medical management of patients requiring long-term total parenteral nutrition, chemotherapy, or hemodialysis. However, the use of a CVAD carries a significant risk of the development of central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI). Antimicrobial lock therapy is indicated for patients with CLABSIs who have no signs of exit site or tunnel infection and for whom catheter salvage is a goal...
March 1, 2018: American Journal of Health-system Pharmacy: AJHP
Tina S Ipe, Marisa B Marques
Therapeutic plasma exchange is an apheresis modality in which plasma is separated from the blood cellular components ex vivo, discarded, and replaced with an isosmotic fluid (most commonly 5% albumin) to maintain appropriate oncotic pressure in the patient. Therapeutic plasma exchange is used in the treatment of many diseases and indications. The recent seventh edition of the American Society for Apheresis guidelines indicates approximately 72 diseases and 116 indications for which therapeutic plasma exchange may be effective...
February 2018: Transfusion
Jeffrey Szymanski, Priyank Shah, Marian Dynis, Donna Mansfield, Connie Hamilton, George Despotis
BACKGROUND: Central venous access devices are commonly used in extracorporeal photopheresis, but their performance has not been systematically evaluated. The primary objective of this study was to compare pressures at various flow rates for central venous access devices in an ex vivo simulation of photopheresis. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Diluted, heparinized red blood cells were circulated through central access devices in series with a photopheresis system, and pressures at several flow rates were recorded...
February 2018: Transfusion
Kristen A Lee, Raja S Ramaswamy
Central venous access has become invaluable in the treatment of patients with a wide array of acute and chronic disease entities. Central venous catheters provide durable, short-term and long-term access solutions while saving the patient from repeated peripheral needle sticks. Central venous catheters include: non-tunneled central venous catheters, tunneled central venous catheters, and port catheters. Typically, the placement of a central venous catheter is performed by Vascular and Interventional Radiologists...
February 2018: Transfusion
Merilda O Blanco-Guzman
Implantable vascular access devices are frequently used in patients who have poor peripheral venous access. These devices can be partially implanted as tunneled and nontunneled central catheters, or they can be fully implanted as ports. Compared with long-term catheters, implanted ports have lower infection rates and improved perceptions of quality of life, but complications still occur in 2% to 18% of patients, frequently requiring removal of the device. Since the conception of implantable vascular access device ports, numerous advances in port design, materials, and techniques for implantation and care have been developed with the goal of overcoming frequent complications...
February 2018: Transfusion
Jill Adamski
Extracorporeal photopheresis is an immunomodulatory therapy indicated for patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, graft-versus-host disease, and heart or lung allograft rejection. Whole blood from the patient is drawn into the photopheresis instrument where it is separated into its components. Plasma, red blood cells, and the treated buffy coat are subsequently returned to the patient. Consistent, adequate blood flow is necessary to successfully complete the procedure. Vascular access options for photopheresis include peripheral vein cannulation, tunneled central venous catheters, and subcutaneous ports...
February 2018: Transfusion
Jose M Marcial, Seth J Worley
Subclavian obstruction is common after lead implantation and the need to add or replace a lead is increasing. Subclavian venoplasty (SV) is a safe and effective option for venous occlusion. Peripheral venography overestimates the severity of the obstruction. A wire can usually be advanced into the central circulation for SV. Compared with dilators, SV improves the quality of venous access, providing unrestricted catheter manipulation for His bundle pacing and left ventricular lead implantation. SV preserves venous access and reduces lead burden...
March 2018: Cardiac Electrophysiology Clinics
Rukhmi Bhat, Riten Kumar, Soyang Kwon, Karna Murthy, Robert I Liem
OBJECTIVE: To identify risk factors associated with venous and arterial thrombosis in sick neonates admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit. STUDY DESIGN: A case-control study was conducted at 2 centers between January 2010 and March 2014 using the Children's Hospital Neonatal Database dataset. Cases were neonates diagnosed with either arterial or venous thrombosis during their neonatal intensive care unit stay; controls were matched in a 1:4 ratio by gestational age and presence or absence of central access devices...
February 2, 2018: Journal of Pediatrics
Leo Kobayashi, Xiao Chi Zhang, Scott A Collins, Naz Karim, Derek L Merck
Introduction: Augmented reality (AR), mixed reality (MR), and virtual reality devices are enabling technologies that may facilitate effective communication in healthcare between those with information and knowledge (clinician/specialist; expert; educator) and those seeking understanding and insight (patient/family; non-expert; learner). Investigators initiated an exploratory program to enable the study of AR/MR use-cases in acute care clinical and instructional settings. Methods: Academic clinician educators, computer scientists, and diagnostic imaging specialists conducted a proof-of-concept project to 1) implement a core holoimaging pipeline infrastructure and open-access repository at the study institution, and 2) use novel AR/MR techniques on off-the-shelf devices with holoimages generated by the infrastructure to demonstrate their potential role in the instructive communication of complex medical information...
January 2018: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
David Paje, Anna Conlon, Scott Kaatz, Lakshmi Swaminathan, Tanya Boldenow, Steven J Bernstein, Scott A Flanders, Vineet Chopra
BACKGROUND: The guidelines for peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) recommend avoiding insertion if the anticipated duration of use is =5 days. However, short-term PICC use is common in hospitals. We sought to identify patient, provider, and device characteristics and the clinical outcomes associated with short-term PICCs. METHODS: Between January 2014 and June 2016, trained abstractors at 52 Michigan Hospital Medicine Safety (HMS) Consortium sites collected data from medical records of adults that received PICCs during hospitalization...
February 2018: Journal of Hospital Medicine: An Official Publication of the Society of Hospital Medicine
Mick Kumwenda, Lisa Dougherty, Helen Spooner, Victoria Jackson, Sandip Mitra, Nicholas Inston
Tunnelled central venous access devices (CVADs) are defined as any intravenous multipurpose catheters placed within the central veins for use in haemodialysis and administration of blood products or chemotherapy in oncology and haematological conditions. Frequent complications include thrombosis and catheter-related infection, which may lead to significant adverse patient outcomes. Once thrombosis is suspected correction should be attempted empirically with thrombolytic agents. Commonly available thrombolytic agents in the UK include urokinase (Syner-Kinase) and alteplase (Cathflo)...
January 25, 2018: British Journal of Nursing: BJN
Yuki Imaoka, Fumito Kuranishi, Yoshiteru Ogawa
BACKGROUND/AIMS: The need for totally implantable central venous access devices (TICVADs) has increased with increased opportunities in the use of chemotherapy and parenteral nutrition. This study aimed to determine the outcomes of TICVAD implantation and use in patients aged ≥85 years. METHODS: Between January 2010 and August 2016, 117 patients underwent TICVAD implantation and their records were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS: Participants were divided into 2 groups (plus-85 and sub-85 groups)...
January 19, 2018: Annals of Nutrition & Metabolism
Brooke T Lawson, Ian A Zealley
PURPOSE: Central venous access in children, in particular small children and infants, is challenging. We have developed a technique employing adult peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) as tunnelled central venous catheters (TCVCs) in children. The principal advantage of this novel technique is that the removal technique is less complex than that of conventional cuffed TCVCs. The catheter can be removed simply by being pulled out and does not require general anaesthesia...
January 17, 2018: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology
Elizabeth Spiwak, Chad Wiesenauer, Arun Panigrahi, Ashok Raj
Central vein thrombosis as a cause of chylothorax is uncommon, and in a few cases in the literature was related to thrombotic complications of central venous access devices (CVAD). Superior vena cava (SVC) occlusion-induced chylothorax has been described in adult sickle cell disease (SCD) in a setting of chronic indwelling CVAD. There are limited reports on chylothorax induced by central venous thrombosis secondary to chronic CVAD in children with SCD. We describe an 8-year-old male patient, with a history of SCD, maintained on long term erythrocytapheresis for primary prevention of stroke, and whose clinical course was complicated by chylothorax which was successfully treated with a pleuroperitoneal shunt...
January 2, 2018: Children
Melissa I Naiman, Maria Gray, Joseph Haymore, Ahmed F Hegazy, Andrej Markota, Neeraj Badjatia, Erik B Kulstad
Controlling patient temperature is important for a wide variety of clinical conditions. Cooling to normal or below normal body temperature is often performed for neuroprotection after ischemic insult (e.g. hemorrhagic stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage, cardiac arrest, or other hypoxic injury). Cooling from febrile states treats fever and reduces the negative effects of hyperthermia on injured neurons. Patients are warmed in the operating room to prevent inadvertent perioperative hypothermia, which is known to cause increased blood loss, wound infections, and myocardial injury, while also prolonging recovery time...
November 21, 2017: Journal of Visualized Experiments: JoVE
Mohit Bajaj, Jon Wells, Anuja Liyanage, Stephen Evans, James Hamill
Permanent central venous access is essential for the management of many pediatric patients. Knowing the amount of ionizing radiation used during the insertion of these devices is important. Our aim was to identify the radiation used in percutaneous insertion of central venous access devices, and to correlate radiation exposure to patient weight. METHODS: Data was prospectively collected during a 12-month period from August 2015 to August 2016 on all ultrasound-guided percutaneous central venous access device insertions...
October 26, 2017: Journal of Pediatric Surgery
Lynn M Malec, James Cooper, Jeffrey Rudolph, Marian G Michaels, Margaret V Ragni
BACKGROUND: Central venous access devices (CVADs) are essential for total parenteral nutrition administration in patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS). However, they are fraught with complications including infection and venous thromboembolism (VTE), which increases associated morbidity and mortality in this population. There is evidence linking the development of CVAD-associated thrombosis and line-related infection. Thus, it has been postulated that prevention of catheter-related clot formation could minimize the risk of infection originating from the catheter...
November 10, 2017: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition
Gracia Mendoza, Anna Regiel-Futyra, Alejandra Tamayo, Marta Monzon, Silvia Irusta, Miguel Angel de Gregorio, Agnieszka Kyzioł, Manuel Arruebo
Central venous access devices play an important role in patients with prolonged intravenous administration requirements. In the last years, the coating of these devices with bactericidal compounds has emerged as a potential tool to prevent bacterial colonization. Our study describes the modification of 3D-printed reservoirs and silicone-based catheters, mimicking central venous access devices, through different approaches including their coating with the well known biocompatible and bactericidal polymer chitosan, with the anionic polysaccharide alginate; also, plasma treated surfaces were included in the study to promote polymer adhesion...
January 1, 2017: Journal of Biomaterials Applications
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