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Nicoletta Bobola, Samir Merabet
Homeodomain proteins are evolutionary conserved proteins present in the entire eukaryote kingdom. They execute functions that are essential for life, both in developing and adult organisms. Most homeodomain proteins act as transcription factors and bind DNA to control the activity of other genes. In contrast to their similar DNA binding specificity, homeodomain proteins execute highly diverse and context-dependent functions. Several factors, including genome accessibility, DNA shape, combinatorial binding and the ability to interact with many transcriptional partners, diversify the activity of homeodomain proteins and culminate in the activation of highly dynamic, context-specific transcriptional programs...
October 18, 2016: Current Opinion in Genetics & Development
Soichi Kojima, Takao Hiraki, Hideo Gobara, Toshihiro Iguchi, Hiroyasu Fujiwara, Yusuke Matsui, Toshiharu Mitsuhashi, Susumu Kanazawa
PURPOSE: To evaluate retrospectively the fracture risk of totally implanted venous access devices connected to Groshong silicone (SC) versus polyurethane (PU) catheters, inserted via the internal jugular vein. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study population comprised 384 SC and 221 PU central venous catheters implanted via the internal jugular vein. The presence of catheter fracture was evaluated. Variables possibly related to catheter fracture were evaluated. First, in order to determine the factors associated with fracture, fracture rates were compared with the log-rank test between the two groups divided by each of the variables...
October 21, 2016: Journal of Vascular Access
Cristina Longo, Vasiliki Rahimzadeh, Kieran O'Doherty, Gillian Bartlett
AIM: Primary care physicians will play a central role in the successful implementation of pharmacogenomics (PGx); however, important challenges remain. We explored the perspectives of stakeholders on key challenges of the PGx translation process in primary care using deliberative consultations. METHODS: Primary care physicians, patients and policy-makers attended deliberations, where they discussed four ethical questions raised by PGx research and implementation in the primary care context...
October 21, 2016: Pharmacogenomics
Rafael Vilhena de Carvalho Fürst, Afonso César Polimanti, Sidnei José Galego, Maria Claudia Bicudo, Erik Montagna, João Antônio Corrêa
OBJECTIVE: To present a simple and affordable model able to properly simulate an ultrasound-guided venous access. DESIGN: The simulation was made using a latex balloon tube filled with water and dye solution implanted in a thawed chicken breast with bones. RESULTS: The presented model allows the simulation of all implant stages of a central catheter. The obtained echogenicity is similar to that observed in human tissue, and the ultrasound identification of the tissues, balloon, needle, wire guide and catheter is feasible and reproducible...
October 20, 2016: World Journal of Surgery
Vanessa Di Cataldo, Alain Géloën, Jean-Baptiste Langlois, Fabien Chauveau, Benoît Thézé, Violaine Hubert, Marlène Wiart, Erica N Chirico, Jennifer Rieusset, Hubert Vidal, Vincent Pialoux, Emmanuelle Canet-Soulas
Aim: Advanced atherosclerosis increases inflammation and stroke risk in the cerebral vasculature. Exercise is known to improve cardio-metabolic profiles when associated with a caloric restriction, but it remains debated whether it is still beneficial without the dietary control. The aim of this study was to determine both the peripheral and central effects of exercise training combined with a cholesterol-rich diet given ad libitum in old ApoE(-/-) mice. Methods: Forty-five-weeks old obese ApoE(-/-) mice fed with a high cholesterol diet ad libitum were divided into Exercise-trained (EX; running wheel free access) and Sedentary (SED) groups...
2016: Frontiers in Physiology
Yoshihiro Ohara, Hitoshi Ohto, Tetsunori Tasaki, Hideki Sano, Kazuhiro Mochizuki, Mitsuko Akaihata, Shogo Kobayashi, Tomoko Waragai, Masaki Ito, Mitsuaki Hosoya, Kenneth E Nollet, Kazuhiko Ikeda, Chitose Ogawa, Takahiro Kanno, Yayoi Shikama, Atsushi Kikuta
BACKGROUND: Pediatric apheresis for peripheral blood stem cell transplantation should be carried out with due concern for low corporeal blood volume and vulnerability to hypocalcemia-related complications, hypovolemic shock, and hypervolemic cardiac overload. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: We retrospectively investigated a total of 267 apheresis procedures from 1990 to 2013 on 93 children between 0 and 10 years old, including 89 patients and 4 healthy donors, with body weights of 6...
September 30, 2016: Transfusion and Apheresis Science
Sunil Sirohi, Arriel Van Cleef, Jon F Davis
Binge eating and binge alcohol intake are behavioral manifestations of pathological feeding and alcohol use disorder (AUD), respectively. Binge-feeding and AUD have high comorbidity with other psychiatric disorders such as depression, which could have important implications for the management of these conditions. Importantly, these behaviors share many common features suggesting a singular etiology. However, the nature by which binge-feeding affects the development or maintenance of AUD is unclear. The present study examined the impact of a binge-feeding from a nutritionally complete high-fat diet (HFD) on initiation and maintenance of alcohol intake, anxiolytic behavior and central genetic changes in brain regions that control alcohol-reinforced behaviors...
October 17, 2016: Physiology & Behavior
Matthias Jacob, Daniel Chappell, Bernhard F Becker
Oxygen delivery to cells is the basic prerequisite of life. Within the human body, an ingenious oxygen delivery system, comprising steps of convection and diffusion from the upper airways via the lungs and the cardiovascular system to the microvascular area, bridges the gap between oxygen in the outside airspace and the interstitial space around the cells. However, the complexity of this evolutionary development makes us prone to pathophysiological problems. While those problems related to respiration and macrohemodynamics have already been successfully addressed by modern medicine, the pathophysiology of the microcirculation is still often a closed book in daily practice...
October 21, 2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
Morahem Ashengroph
The present study has been conducted towards isolation of moderately halophilic bacteria capable of transforming caffeine into theobromine. A total of 45 caffeine-degrading moderate halophiles were enriched from hypersaline lakes and examined for the biotransformation of caffeine to theobromine by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and high-performance liquid chromatography analyses. Strain GL6, giving the highest yield of theobromine, was isolated from the Hoz Soltan Lake, 20 % w/v salinity, central Iran, and identified as Salinivibrio costicola based on morphological and biochemical features as well as its 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis (GeneBank Accession No...
October 19, 2016: Current Microbiology
Peter Giovannini, Melanie-Jayne R Howes, Sarah E Edwards
The data described in this article is related to the review article "Medicinal plants used in the traditional management of diabetes and its sequelae in Central America: a review" (Giovannini et al., 2016) [1]. We searched publications on the useful plants of Central America in databases and journals by using selected relevant keywords. We then extracted reported uses of medicinal plants within the disease categories: diabetes mellitus, kidney disease, urinary problems, skin diseases and infections, cardiovascular disease, sexual dysfunction, vision loss, and nerve damage...
June 2016: Data in Brief
Ashutosh Kumar Verma, Sunita Singh Dhawan, Seema Singh, Kumar Avinash Bharati, Jyotsana
BACKGROUND: Gymnema sylvestre, a vulnerable plant species, is mentioned in Indian Pharmacopeia as an antidiabetic drug. OBJECTIVE: Study of genetic and chemical diversity and its implications in accessions of G. sylvestre. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fourteen accessions of G. sylvestre collected from Central India and assessment of their genetic and chemical diversity were carried out using ISSR (inter simple sequence repeat) and HPLC (high performance liquid chromatography) fingerprinting methods...
July 2016: Pharmacognosy Magazine
Sheena Mary McCormack, Veronica Noseda, Jean-Michel Molina
INTRODUCTION: In contrast to the global trend showing a decline in new HIV infections, the number reported in the World Health Organization (WHO) region of Europe is increasing. Health systems are disparate, but even countries with free access to screening and treatment observe continuing high rates of new infections in key populations, notably men who have sex with men (MSM). Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is only available in France. This commentary describes the European epidemics and healthcare settings where PrEP could be delivered, how need might be estimated for MSM and the residual barriers to access...
2016: Journal of the International AIDS Society
Mark R Cronan, Rebecca W Beerman, Allison F Rosenberg, Joseph W Saelens, Matthew G Johnson, Stefan H Oehlers, Dana M Sisk, Kristen L Jurcic Smith, Neil A Medvitz, Sara E Miller, Le A Trinh, Scott E Fraser, John F Madden, Joanne Turner, Jason E Stout, Sunhee Lee, David M Tobin
Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in humans triggers formation of granulomas, which are tightly organized immune cell aggregates that are the central structure of tuberculosis. Infected and uninfected macrophages interdigitate, assuming an altered, flattened appearance. Although pathologists have described these changes for over a century, the molecular and cellular programs underlying this transition are unclear. Here, using the zebrafish-Mycobacterium marinum model, we found that mycobacterial granuloma formation is accompanied by macrophage induction of canonical epithelial molecules and structures...
October 18, 2016: Immunity
Umit Kervan, Sinan Sabit Kocabeyoglu, Dogan Emre Sert, Emre Aygün, Kemal Kavasoglu, Mehmet Karahan, Ertekin Utku Unal, Mustafa Pac
OBJECTIVES: The common femoral artery is the standard site for immediate vascular access when initiating adult venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. However, this approach is fraught with problems such as femoral artery occlusion, distal limb ischemia, reperfusion injury resulting in compartment syndrome, retroperitoneal hemorrhage, thrombosis, embolization, and most importantly, pulmonary edema. Here, we show our preference of using the subclavian artery with a side graft as a different cannulation technique for outflow of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, which can avoid complications associated with different access techniques...
October 14, 2016: Experimental and Clinical Transplantation
Banafsheh Bakhshoude, Hassan Ravari, Gholam Hosein Kazemzadeh, Masoud Pezeshki Rad
INTRODUCTION: Currently, venography is the standard diagnostic method to examine veins before implementing access, which is invasive in nature. Computerized tomography venography (CTV) can simultaneously indicate deep and superficial venous systems in the upper extremity and their relation to the surrounding anatomical structures; however, its diagnostic value in the detection of central venous disease has yet to be defined. The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of CT venography compared to venography in the diagnosis of stenosis and the occlusion of subclavian veins and the superior vena in renal failure patients...
August 2016: Electronic Physician
Shou-Wu Lee, Han-Chung Lien, Chi-Sen Chang, Teng-Yu Lee, Yen-Chun Peng, Hong-Zen Yeh
BACKGROUND: Metabolic syndrome has been highlighted as a risk factor for several gastrointestinal diseases, including gastroesophageal reflux disease and Barrett's esophagus (BE). The aim of this study was to investigate the association of metabolic syndrome with erosive esophagitis (EE) and BE. METHODS: Data were retrospectively collected from patients who visited the Medical Screening Center at Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan from January 2006 to December 2009...
October 15, 2016: Journal of the Chinese Medical Association: JCMA
Zaheed Damani, Gail MacKean, Eric Bohm, Brie DeMone, Brock Wright, Tom Noseworthy, Jayna Holroyd-Leduc, Deborah A Marshall
BACKGROUND: Policy dialogues are critical for developing responsive, effective, sustainable, evidence-informed policy. Our multidisciplinary team, including researchers, physicians and senior decision-makers, comprehensively evaluated The Winnipeg Central Intake Service, a single-entry model in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to improve patient access to hip/knee replacement surgery. We used the evaluation findings to develop five evidence-informed policy directions to help improve access to scheduled clinical services across Manitoba...
October 18, 2016: Health Research Policy and Systems
Omar Ali Juma, Zachary Obinna Enumah, Hannah Wheatley, Mohamed Yunus Rafiq, Seif Shekalaghe, Ali Ali, Shishira Mgonia, Salim Abdulla
BACKGROUND: Malnutrition has long been associated with poverty, poor diet and inadequate access to health care, and it remains a key global health issue that both stems from and contributes to ill-health, with 50 % of childhood deaths due to underlying undernutrition. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of malnutrition among children under-five seen at Bagamoyo District Hospital (BDH) and three rural health facilities ranging between 25 and 55 km from Bagamoyo: Kiwangwa, Fukayosi, and Yombo...
October 19, 2016: BMC Public Health
Venetia Bigley, Dawn Barge, Matthew Collin
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Dendritic cells are specialized antigen-presenting cells which link innate and adaptive immunity, through recognition and presentation of antigen to T cells. Although the importance of dendritic cells has been demonstrated in many animal models, their contribution to human immunity remains relatively unexplored in vivo.Given their central role in infection, autoimmunity, and malignancy, dendritic cell deficiency or dysfunction would be expected to have clinical consequences...
October 17, 2016: Current Opinion in Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Heather Bailey, Anna Turkova, Claire Thorne
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA) has experienced large-scale epidemics of syphilis, hepatitis C virus (HCV) and HIV over the past few decades. Here, we review recent evidence on the epidemiology of and the response to these intersecting epidemics. RECENT FINDINGS: The HIV epidemic in EECA continues to expand, with new infections increasing by more than 50% between 2010 and 2015. HCV is now in the top 10 causes of death in EECA, with Russia accounting for more than half of the global burden of HCV infections, but access to direct-acting antivirals remains a major obstacle for control of the epidemic...
October 15, 2016: Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases
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