Read by QxMD icon Read

Bacterial adaptive immunity

Yohann Nédélec, Joaquín Sanz, Golshid Baharian, Zachary A Szpiech, Alain Pacis, Anne Dumaine, Jean-Christophe Grenier, Andrew Freiman, Aaron J Sams, Steven Hebert, Ariane Pagé Sabourin, Francesca Luca, Ran Blekhman, Ryan D Hernandez, Roger Pique-Regi, Jenny Tung, Vania Yotova, Luis B Barreiro
Individuals from different populations vary considerably in their susceptibility to immune-related diseases. To understand how genetic variation and natural selection contribute to these differences, we tested for the effects of African versus European ancestry on the transcriptional response of primary macrophages to live bacterial pathogens. A total of 9.3% of macrophage-expressed genes show ancestry-associated differences in the gene regulatory response to infection, and African ancestry specifically predicts a stronger inflammatory response and reduced intracellular bacterial growth...
October 20, 2016: Cell
Hélène Quach, Maxime Rotival, Julien Pothlichet, Yong-Hwee Eddie Loh, Michael Dannemann, Nora Zidane, Guillaume Laval, Etienne Patin, Christine Harmant, Marie Lopez, Matthieu Deschamps, Nadia Naffakh, Darragh Duffy, Anja Coen, Geert Leroux-Roels, Frederic Clément, Anne Boland, Jean-François Deleuze, Janet Kelso, Matthew L Albert, Lluis Quintana-Murci
Humans differ in the outcome that follows exposure to life-threatening pathogens, yet the extent of population differences in immune responses and their genetic and evolutionary determinants remain undefined. Here, we characterized, using RNA sequencing, the transcriptional response of primary monocytes from Africans and Europeans to bacterial and viral stimuli-ligands activating Toll-like receptor pathways (TLR1/2, TLR4, and TLR7/8) and influenza virus-and mapped expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs)...
October 20, 2016: Cell
Amy R Mackos, Ross Maltz, Michael T Bailey
Over the past decade, it has become increasingly evident that there are extensive bidirectional interactions between the body and its microbiota. These interactions are evident during stressful periods, where it is recognized that commensal microbiota community structure is significantly changed. Many different stressors, ranging from early life stressors to stressors administered during adulthood, lead to significant, community-wide differences in the microbiota. The mechanisms through which this occurs are not yet known, but it is known that commensal microbes can recognize, and respond to, mammalian hormones and neurotransmitters, including those that are involved with the physiological response to stressful stimuli...
October 16, 2016: Hormones and Behavior
Erica L Heipertz, Jourdan Harper, Wendy E Walker
IFN regulatory factor (IRF)3 plays a detrimental role in the cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) mouse model of sepsis. However, it is unclear which pathway activates IRF3 in this context. In this report we investigate two pathways that activate IRF3: the Stimulator of Interferon Genes (STING) pathway (which senses cytosolic DNA) and the TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF) pathway (which sense dsRNA and LPS via Toll-like receptor (TLR) 3 and 4). Initially, we examine the impact of these pathways using a severe CLP model (∼90% mortality)...
October 17, 2016: Shock
Miguel Pinto, Vítor Borges, Minia Antelo, Miguel Pinheiro, Alexandra Nunes, Jacinta Azevedo, Maria José Borrego, Joana Mendonça, Dina Carpinteiro, Luís Vieira, João Paulo Gomes
Insights into the genomic adaptive traits of Treponema pallidum, the causative bacterium of syphilis, have long been hampered due to the absence of in vitro culture models and the constraints associated with its propagation in rabbits. Here, we have bypassed the culture bottleneck by means of a targeted strategy never applied to uncultivable bacterial human pathogens to directly capture whole-genome T. pallidum data in the context of human infection. This strategy has unveiled a scenario of discreet T. pallidum interstrain single-nucleotide-polymorphism-based microevolution, contrasting with a rampant within-patient genetic heterogeneity mainly targeting multiple phase-variable loci and a major antigen-coding gene (tprK)...
October 17, 2016: Nature Microbiology
Ye Cao, Kai Guan, Xiang He, Congwen Wei, Zirui Zheng, Yanhong Zhang, Shengli Ma, Hui Zhong, Wei Shi
The Yersinia outer protein J (YopJ) plays a pivotal role in evading the host immune response and establishes a persistent infection in host cells after bacterial infection. YopJ is a cysteine protease and can act as a deubiquitinating enzyme that deubiquitinates several targets in multiple signaling pathways. Stimulator of interferon genes (STING) is a critical adapter for the induction of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) phosphorylation and subsequent production of the cytokines in response to nucleic acids in the cytoplasm...
October 11, 2016: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta
B Dréno, E Araviiskaia, E Berardesca, G Gontijo, M Sanchez Viera, L F Xiang, R Martin, T Bieber
The skin is a complex barrier organ made of a symbiotic relationship between microbial communities and host tissue via complex signals provided by the innate and the adaptive immune systems. It is constantly exposed to various endogenous and exogenous factors which impact this balanced system potentially leading to inflammatory skin conditions comprising infections, allergies or autoimmune diseases. Unlike the gut and stool microbiome which has been studied and described for many years, investigations on the skin or scalp microbiome only started recently...
October 13, 2016: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology: JEADV
Reinhild Feuerstein, Julia Kolter, Philipp Henneke
The dermis, a major reservoir of immune cells in immediate vicinity to the colonizing skin microflora, serves as an important site of host-pathogen interactions. Macrophages (Mϕ) are the most frequent resident immune cell type in the dermis. They protect the host from invasive infections by highly adapted bacteria, such as staphylococci via pattern recognition of bacterial effectors, phagocytosis, and recruitment of other myeloid cells from the blood. Already under homeostatic conditions, the dermal Mϕ population receives a dynamic input of monocytes invading from the bloodstream...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Leukocyte Biology
Masamitsu Kono, M Ammar Zafar, Marisol Zuniga, Aoife M Roche, Shigeto Hamaguchi, Jeffrey N Weiser
Herein, we studied a virulent isolate of the leading bacterial pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae in an infant mouse model of colonization, disease and transmission, both with and without influenza A (IAV) co-infection. To identify vulnerable points in the multiple steps involved in pneumococcal pathogenesis, this model was utilized for a comprehensive analysis of population bottlenecks. Our findings reveal that in the setting of IAV co-infection the organism must pass through single cell bottlenecks during bloodstream invasion from the nasopharynx within the host and in transmission between hosts...
October 2016: PLoS Pathogens
E Peel, Y Cheng, J T Djordjevic, S Fox, T C Sorrell, K Belov
Tasmanian devil joeys, like other marsupials, are born at a very early stage of development, prior to the development of their adaptive immune system, yet survive in a pathogen-laden pouch and burrow. Antimicrobial peptides, called cathelicidins, which provide innate immune protection during early life, are expressed in the pouch lining, skin and milk of devil dams. These peptides are active against pathogens identified in the pouch microbiome. Of the six characterised cathelicidins, Saha-CATH5 and 6 have broad-spectrum antibacterial activity and are capable of killing problematic human pathogens including methicillin-resistant S...
October 11, 2016: Scientific Reports
Karen L Maxwell, Bianca Garcia, Joseph Bondy-Denomy, Diane Bona, Yurima Hidalgo-Reyes, Alan R Davidson
Bacterial CRISPR-Cas adaptive immune systems use small guide RNAs to protect against phage infection and invasion by foreign genetic elements. We previously demonstrated that a group of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phages encode anti-CRISPR proteins that inactivate the type I-F and I-E CRISPR-Cas systems using distinct mechanisms. Here, we present the three-dimensional structure of an anti-CRISPR protein and map a functional surface that is critical for its potent inhibitory activity. The interaction of the anti-CRISPR protein with the CRISPR-Cas complex through this functional surface is proposed to prevent the binding of target DNA...
October 11, 2016: Nature Communications
Yujing Bi
As a pathogen of plague, Yersinia pestis caused three massive pandemics in history that killed hundreds of millions of people. Yersinia pestis is highly invasive, causing severe septicemia which, if untreated, is usually fatal to its host. To survive in the host and maintain a persistent infection, Yersinia pestis uses several stratagems to evade the innate and the adaptive immune responses. For example, infections with this organism are biphasic, involving an initial "noninflammatory" phase where bacterial replication occurs initially with little inflammation and following by extensive phagocyte influx, inflammatory cytokine production, and considerable tissue destruction, which is called "proinflammatory" phase...
2016: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Punsiri M Colonne, Caylin G Winchell, Daniel E Voth
Intracellular bacterial pathogens replicate within eukaryotic cells and display unique adaptations that support key infection events including invasion, replication, immune evasion, and dissemination. From invasion to dissemination, all stages of the intracellular bacterial life cycle share the same three-dimensional cytosolic space containing the host cytoskeleton. For successful infection and replication, many pathogens hijack the cytoskeleton using effector proteins introduced into the host cytosol by specialized secretion systems...
2016: Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology
Amrita Singh, Debojyoti Chakraborty, Souvik Maiti
The CRISPR-Cas9 system has revolutionized the process of making changes to the DNA sequence of organisms. Relying on a simplistic model of RNA guided DNA binding and cleavage, this molecular toolbox has found application in nearly every branch of biological sciences. The story of CRISPR-Cas9 is one of discovery and development where a component of bacterial adaptive immunity has been harnessed to address important biological questions using significant inputs from physicochemical structure-function studies...
September 14, 2016: Chemical Society Reviews
Farzana Ferdous, Christopher Saski, William Bridges, Matthew Burns, Heather Dunn, Kathryn Elliott, Thomas R Scott
Thrombocytes are nucleated platelets involved in immune functions such as pathogen recognition and release of pro-inflammatory bioactive compounds when exposed to bacterial and viral molecules. However, the complete role of these cells in innate and adaptive immune responses is not understood, and little is known about their biology at the molecular-genetic level. Highly sensitive RNA-sequencing technologies were used to analyze the complete transcriptome of thrombocytes for the first time with analytical resolution focused on cell-based components of the immune system/response...
2016: PloS One
René H M Raeven, Jolanda Brummelman, Larissa van der Maas, Wichard Tilstra, Jeroen L A Pennings, Wanda G H Han, Cécile A C M van Els, Elly van Riet, Gideon F A Kersten, Bernard Metz
Effective immunity against Bordetella pertussis is currently under discussion following the stacking evidence of pertussis resurgence in the vaccinated population. Natural immunity is more effective than vaccine-induced immunity indicating that knowledge on infection-induced responses may contribute to improve vaccination strategies. We applied a systems biology approach comprising microarray, flow cytometry and multiplex immunoassays to unravel the molecular and cellular signatures in unprotected mice and protected mice with infection-induced immunity, around a B...
2016: PloS One
Magdalena Hryhorowicz, Daniel Lipiński, Joanna Zeyland, Ryszard Słomski
CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated) adaptive immune systems constitute a bacterial defence against invading nucleic acids derived from bacteriophages or plasmids. This prokaryotic system was adapted in molecular biology and became one of the most powerful and versatile platforms for genome engineering. CRISPR/Cas9 is a simple and rapid tool which enables the efficient modification of endogenous genes in various species and cell types. Moreover, a modified version of the CRISPR/Cas9 system with transcriptional repressors or activators allows robust transcription repression or activation of target genes...
October 3, 2016: Archivum Immunologiae et Therapiae Experimentalis
Qiao-Qing Zhong, Xiang Wang, Yun-Feng Li, Li-Jun Peng, Zhi-Sheng Jiang
Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), a serine protease inhibitor, which was most commonly examined in mucosal fluids such as saliva, is a versatile molecule and plays non-redundant roles. In addition to its anti-protease activity, SLPI has been shown to express anti-bacterial, anti-viral, anti-fungal, and anti-inflammatory properties as well as participating in innate and adaptive immune responses, most of which has been well documented. Recently, it is reported that SLPI is expressed in adipocytes and adipose tissue where it could play an important feedback role in the resolution of inflammation...
October 3, 2016: Experimental Biology and Medicine
Wei Luo, Xin Wang, Hongyue Qu, Geng Qin, Huixian Zhang, Qiang Lin
The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes are crucial in the adaptive immune system, and the gene duplication of MHC in animals can generally result in immune flexibility. In this study, we found that the lined seahorse (Hippocampus erectus) has only one gene copy number (GCN) of MHC IIα and IIβ, which is different from that in other teleosts. Together with the lack of spleen and gut-associated lymphatic tissue (GALT), the seahorse may be referred to as having a partial but natural "immunodeficiency"...
September 30, 2016: Fish & Shellfish Immunology
Maria Fernanda Pascutti, Martje N Erkelens, Martijn A Nolte
The ability of the bone marrow (BM) to generate copious amounts of blood cells required on a daily basis depends on a highly orchestrated process of proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). This process can be rapidly adapted under stress conditions, such as infections, to meet the specific cellular needs of the immune response and the ensuing physiological changes. This requires a tight regulation in order to prevent either hematopoietic failure or transformation...
2016: Frontiers in Immunology
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"